Why Are My Pepsi Bottles Suddenly Impossible To Open?

Why Are My Pepsi Bottles Suddenly Impossible To Open?

It’s Soda Bottle Complaint Week here at The Consumerist. Today’s complaint is against Pepsi two-liter bottles and Mott’s apple juice bottles, which Anthony thinks are far too difficult to open. He has to use pliers. Is he the only one? [More]

SIGG Asks For Gift Certificate Code, Charges Debit Card Anyway

SIGG Asks For Gift Certificate Code, Charges Debit Card Anyway

Four months in, customers are still experiencing problems with SIGG USA’s metal bottle replacement program. Amy writes that her purchase required her to input billing information, even though she had gift certificate code, her debit card was charged, and she has been unable to reach SIGG to obtain a refund. [More]

Never Embarrass Yourself Trying To Unscrew A Wine Bottle Again

Never Embarrass Yourself Trying To Unscrew A Wine Bottle Again

The horrible thing about screw-cap bottles of wine, says the website butterflywineopener.com, is that they suck all the romance out of bottle opening. But lucky you! “The Butterflyâ„¢ solves that by flawlessly and expediently opening any screw cap bottle while retaining the elegance of traditional wine service.” [More]

Carry Liquids On A Plane In 2-Liter Bottles

Carry Liquids On A Plane In 2-Liter Bottles

“Baby Soda Bottles” are 2-liter bottles before they’ve been heated and formed into their soda bottle shape. In this pre-bottle stage, they make waterproof, hard-to-crush containers for small objects, and they hold approximately 2 ounces of liquid which makes them useful for air travel. Oh also, you can use regular 2-liter bottle caps on them.

Water Bottles Marketed To BPA-Fearing Parents Contained BPA All Along

Water Bottles Marketed To BPA-Fearing Parents Contained BPA All Along

I may as well attach my Nalgene bottles to myself with steel cables, but it seems like everyone is switching over to metal bottles because of the public’s new-found fear of plastic additive bisphenol-A (BPA.) One of the major manufacturers of aluminum bottles, Sigg, recently admitted that the plastic liners of their metal bottles kind of, um, contained BPA. Cue uproar.

Chicago Bans BPA In Baby Bottles

Chicago Bans BPA In Baby Bottles

The Chicago City Council has voted to ban the controversial chemical BPA in baby bottles, says the Associated Press.

Minnesota Becomes First State To Ban BPA

Minnesota Becomes First State To Ban BPA

Minnesota has enacted the “Toxic Free Kids Act,” which will ban bisphenol-A (BPA) in sippy cups and baby bottles. Minnesota joins Suffolk County, New York, which banned BPA earlier this year. Other states and counties, as well as the federal government, are considering bans on the potentially dangerous chemical, which has been linked to all sorts of adverse health effects. The Minnesota ban goes into effect in 2011. (Photo: tiffanywashko)

Glass Baby Bottles Hit The Market To Answer Concerned Parents' Fears Of Plastic

Glass Baby Bottles Hit The Market To Answer Concerned Parents' Fears Of Plastic

Earlier this month, several consumer groups announced that heated plastic baby bottles leach bisphenol A “in amounts that were within the range shown to cause harm in animal studies.” Now a reader writes in to tell us that companies are already starting to respond to the issue with announcements that they’ll be releasing glass bottles in addition to plastic versions.

Cancer Fears Prompt Retailer To Pull Nalgene Bottles

Cancer Fears Prompt Retailer To Pull Nalgene Bottles

Canada’s premier sporting goods store has pulled Nalgene bottles from their shelves over concerns that bottles are made with a cancer-causing chemical. The Vancouver-based Mountain Equipment Co-op is waiting for the outcome of a study from Health Canada on the health effects of bisphenol-a (B.P.A.) before returning the ubiquitous bottles to shelves.

Aquafina Changes Label, Admits It's Tap Water

Aquafina Changes Label, Admits It's Tap Water

Aquafina, PepsiCo’s best-selling bottled water, is changing its label to clarify its true source: city water supplies. The labels have never claimed to be spring water, but the price, packaging, and placement in stores apparently made enough of the world believe it was.