8 Things Companies Have Said That Sounded Like April Fool’s Jokes But Sadly Weren’t

8 Things Companies Have Said That Sounded Like April Fool’s Jokes But Sadly Weren’t

For the calendar-challenged, we’ll point out that today is April 1, meaning the Internet is full of phony products, fake stories, doctored photos… so, you know, it’s like most days on the Internet. Rather than serve up a “United Charges Upgrade Fee For Merely Being Jealous Of First-Class Passengers” headline, or a post about Comcast CEO Brian Roberts giving up his job to play Gretl Von Trapp in a regional theater production of The Sound of Music, we’re looking back at some stories that would have been appropriate for April Fool’s. [More]

Studies Link Plastic Food Packaging To Diabetes, Obesity Risks In Kids

Studies Link Plastic Food Packaging To Diabetes, Obesity Risks In Kids

Because there are apparently not enough studies to convince the Food and Drug Administration that controversial chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) should not be used in just about every form of food packaging, yet another study has been published linking BPA to childhood obesity. Meanwhile, a separate study released today showed a possible connection between a widely used plasticizer and diabetes. [More]

(moxythecat)

FDA Bans BPA From Infant Formula Packaging (Because Manufacturers Have Already Stopped Using It)

Fresh off patting itself on the back for only approving two new cigarette products (because they’re basically the same as the cigarettes already on the market), the Food and Drug Administration is continuing to show its willingness to take a timid stance on a controversial topic, by banning the use of the chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) in the packaging of infant formula… because packagers have all stopped using it anyway. [More]

(Eric Spiegel)

Study Links BPA In Food Packaging To Higher Rates Of Obesity In Girls

There are already so many things for parents to worry about when it comes to helping kids grow up healthy. And apparently, in addition to fast food and couch potato syndrome, there could be another factor contributing to the obesity epidemic in America and abroad. A new study says girls between ages 9 and 12 with high BPA (Bisphenol-A) levels had double the risk of being obese than girls with low levels of the chemical. [More]

(Eric Spiegel)

Congress To Once Again Consider Legislation That Would Ban BPA From Food Packaging

Bisphenol-A (better known as BPA) is a chemical used in all manner of food packaging, in spite of numerous studies linking BPA to everything from increased risks of certain cancers to diabetes, reproductive abnormalities, heart disease, and maybe even childhood obesity. Since the FDA has decided there still wasn’t enough science to ban BPA from food packaging (though it later hedged on this ruling and banned BPA from baby bottles), lawmakers in Congress are having another go at a legislative effort to limit the use of BPA. [More]

As If We Need Another Reason To Hate BPAs, Study Links Them To Higher Childhood Obesity Rates

As If We Need Another Reason To Hate BPAs, Study Links Them To Higher Childhood Obesity Rates

Chemical bisphenol-A, otherwise known as widely-reviled and controversial BPA, now has another bit of mud to wipe off its face. A new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association has linked it to higher levels of obesity in kids who have more of it coursing through their bodies. While the research doesn’t conclusively say that BPA actually causes obesity, it does add to a growing heap of evidence that the stuff isn’t good for us. [More]

FDA Finally Decides That BPA Doesn’t Belong In Baby Bottles

FDA Finally Decides That BPA Doesn’t Belong In Baby Bottles

Nearly four months after deciding not to listen to science or common sense and ban the use of controversial chemical bisphenol-A (you may call it BPA around your household) in food packaging, the Food and Drug Administration has decided that we should at least keep BPA out of the mouths of babies. [More]

The BPA! It's On Your Receipts! Get It Off Aaaa!

The BPA! It's On Your Receipts! Get It Off Aaaa!

The Environmental Working Group has a theory to explain why bisphenol-A, the controversial chemical that’s sometimes found in plastic bottles and can linings, shows up in the urine of over 90% of the population: it’s on paper receipts. The group found BPA on 40% of receipts collected from the sorts of businesses you visit every week, with the concentration topping 1000 times that of a can lining in some cases. [More]

SIGG CEO Contacts Customer, Restores Faith In Bottle Exchange

SIGG CEO Contacts Customer, Restores Faith In Bottle Exchange

A few months ago, SIGG USA announced that the plastic liners of their metal water bottles actually contain the dread plastic additive bisphenol-A (BPA.) Since avoiding BPA is the reason for the popularity of metal water bottles in the first place, SIGG offered to exchange the thousands of the offending bottles for shiny new ones. Many Consumerist readers have written in to share their tales of mixups, confusion, and mysterious $50,000 gift certificates in dealing with the replacement program, but Matt actually had a pleasant experience, and he shared it with Consumerist. [More]

SIGG, Where Are My Replacement Water Bottles?

SIGG, Where Are My Replacement Water Bottles?

Back in August, SIGG USA announced that metal, plastic-lined water bottles it had sold as “BPA-free” did, in fact, have plastic liners containing BPA. While the company insisted that the chemical didn’t leach into water. Reader Cassi owned eight bottles, and decided to participate in Sigg’s exchange program. Too bad the “exchange” part of the transaction isn’t going very smoothly.

SIGG Will Replace BPA-Containing Bottles For Free

SIGG Will Replace BPA-Containing Bottles For Free

Last week, Swiss company SIGG splashed a bunch of ice water in the faces of consumers who go out of their way to avoid products containing bisphenol-A (BPA). The company announced that the linings formerly used in their aluminum bottles did, in fact, contain the controversial substance.

Water Bottles Marketed To BPA-Fearing Parents Contained BPA All Along

Water Bottles Marketed To BPA-Fearing Parents Contained BPA All Along

I may as well attach my Nalgene bottles to myself with steel cables, but it seems like everyone is switching over to metal bottles because of the public’s new-found fear of plastic additive bisphenol-A (BPA.) One of the major manufacturers of aluminum bottles, Sigg, recently admitted that the plastic liners of their metal bottles kind of, um, contained BPA. Cue uproar.

Consumer Advocate/Plastics Industry Showdown In California

Consumer Advocate/Plastics Industry Showdown In California

Ten years ago, Consumers Union (publisher of Consumer Reports and owner of Consumerist) warned us all about the potential danger from bisphenol A (BPA) leeching from plastic containers into our food. It’s only in recent years that municipalities got around to banning the chemical—at least in containers designed for use by infants and small children.

Comprehensive Food Safety Reform Moves Forward In Congress

Comprehensive Food Safety Reform Moves Forward In Congress

The House Energy and Commerce Committee just approved comprehensive food safety reform, setting it up for consideration on the House floor in the coming months. The Food Safety Enhancement Act was approved by voice vote, indicating bipartisan support and suggesting a relatively smooth passage through the entire House.

Industry Brainstorms How To Convince Consumers BPA Isn't The Devil

Industry Brainstorms How To Convince Consumers BPA Isn't The Devil

As studies continue to link bisphenol-A (BPA) with all sorts of health problems, states and cities are banning the chemical from baby bottles and sippy cups and Congress is considering a ban in all food containers. This worries industry groups, who last week held a private meeting to devise strategy to protect the use of BPA. Someone sent the notes to the Washington Post.

Minnesota Becomes First State To Ban BPA

Minnesota Becomes First State To Ban BPA

Minnesota has enacted the “Toxic Free Kids Act,” which will ban bisphenol-A (BPA) in sippy cups and baby bottles. Minnesota joins Suffolk County, New York, which banned BPA earlier this year. Other states and counties, as well as the federal government, are considering bans on the potentially dangerous chemical, which has been linked to all sorts of adverse health effects. The Minnesota ban goes into effect in 2011. (Photo: tiffanywashko)

http://consumerist.com/2009/04/02/suffolk-county-executive-steve-levy/

Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy has signed the nation’s first BPA ban into law. The law bans BPA from empty children’s containers like sippy cups and bottles, and will go into effect in 90 days. The infants of Long Island just got a little safer.

No More BPA Baby Bottles In US?

No More BPA Baby Bottles In US?

Philips Avent, the nation’s largest seller of baby bottles, announced today that it will voluntarily stop selling bottles containing the controversial chemical bisphenol A (BPA). Attorneys general from Connecticut and New Jersey had written a letter to several bottle makers asking them to stop, and the Washington Post says the six largest baby bottle manufacturers in the country have voluntarily complied.