(me and the sysop)

FTC Accuses Company Of Cramming Millions Of Dollars Of Bogus Charges On Wireless Bills

In the first case of its kind for the wireless industry, the Federal Trade Commission has accused a company and its owners of raking in millions of dollars by charging wireless customers for text services they never signed up for. [More]

FTC: Wireless Customers Should Be Able To Block All Third-Party Charges To Phone Bill

FTC: Wireless Customers Should Be Able To Block All Third-Party Charges To Phone Bill

While the FCC has recently enacted rule changes that make it more difficult for predatory third-party businesses to cram unwanted and unauthorized charges on consumers’ landline phone bills, it is still in the process of considering what to do about bill-cramming for wireless customers. For what it’s worth, the folks at the Federal Trade Commission have chimed in with their suggestion: Wireless providers should be required to give customers the option to block all third-party charges from their bills. [More]

FTC Goes After Nation's Largest 3rd-Party Billing Company For Profiting Off Bill-Cramming

FTC Goes After Nation's Largest 3rd-Party Billing Company For Profiting Off Bill-Cramming

The federal crackdown on the practice of landline bill-cramming — the slathering on of charges for often unauthorized third-party services onto consumers’ phone bills — continues, with the Federal Trade Commission accusing the country’s largest third-party billing business of attempting to cram $70 million worth of bogus charges down consumers’ throats. [More]

FCC Approves Anti-Cramming Rules For Landlines, But Nothing Yet On Wireless

FCC Approves Anti-Cramming Rules For Landlines, But Nothing Yet On Wireless

It’s been almost a year since the FCC finally got around to considering rule changes to keep landline phone service providers from padding customers’ bills with charges for third-party services that range from long-distance service to yoga classes. Today, the commission announced some new regulations — but they only goes so far in protecting consumers. [More]