Azureus: Other ISPs May Also Be Throttling BitTorrent

Azureus: Other ISPs May Also Be Throttling BitTorrent

A few months ago Azureus petitioned the FCC, which led to a FCC hearing in February. One of the complaints from the commission was that there is little data available on the scope of BitTorrent throttling, a gap Azureus now tries to fill by collecting data on the prevalence of TCP-resets among ISPs worldwide.

AT&T Promises Nationwide Naked DSL By The End Of The Year

AT&T Promises Nationwide Naked DSL By The End Of The Year

Naked DSL, (DSL without the requirement to have a landline), will be available nationwide by the end of the year, according to statement made by AT&T to the Wall Street Journal.

AT&T Swears $10 DSL Is Available, But Only If You Don't Follow Their Directions

AT&T Swears $10 DSL Is Available, But Only If You Don't Follow Their Directions

AT&T gave St. Louis Post-Dispatch columnist Michael Sorkin step-by-step directions for signing up for their $10 DSL offer that did not work. Sorkin had joined in us reprimanding AT&T for hiding the $10 DSL package that will surely usher in the apocalypse if ever found by customers. AT&T told Sorkin the whole hiding the ultra-cheap internet service thing was just a big misunderstanding:

AT&T spokesman Kerry Hibbs says the company hears you and “We’ve changed our website to make our $10 DSL offer more prominent and easier to find.” [More]

AT&T CEO: $10 DSL "Not A Product That Our Customers Have Clamored For"

AT&T CEO: $10 DSL "Not A Product That Our Customers Have Clamored For"

AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson told the Atlanta Journal Constitution that his customer just aren’t interested in ultra-cheap internet service. AT&T is required to offer $10 DSL throughout 22 states, a concession made to the FTC as part of a deal to acquire BellSouth. AT&T has been accused of hiding the $10 DSL option, which, apparently, they did for the sake of their customers. From the Atlanta Journal Constitution:

AT&T Giving Consumers The Runaround Over Secret $10 DSL

AT&T Giving Consumers The Runaround Over Secret $10 DSL

AT&T is required to offer a $10 DSL option to those consumers who are in AT&T’s 22 state coverage area and who have not previously subscribed to AT&T DSL. This requirement is part of concessions made to the FTC so that AT&T could merge with BellSouth and take over Cingular.

BellSouth’s Site Tracks Your IP And Then They Telemarket You

Is a company allowed to call you up after you go to their website, even if you haven’t even given them your phone number?

Stephen Colbert Explains the Cingular/AT&T/BellSouth Merger

[via Gizmodo]

Verizon & BellSouth Back Away Nervously From Mystery DSL Fee

Verizon & BellSouth Back Away Nervously From Mystery DSL Fee

Last year, the federal government finally eliminated a charge to DSL consumers that subsidized phone service in underdeveloped rural areas. Good. It was a silly, antiquated fee that has long since been irrelevant.

Verizon Drops Baseless DSL Fee After FCC Pressure

Verizon Drops Baseless DSL Fee After FCC Pressure

Nine days after installing a new “supplier surcharge” fee to essentially replace one government regulators dropped, Verizon DSL decided to stop levying the fee. Verizon came under heat from customers and received a letter from the FCC asking it to explain its actions. BellSouth, which also received a FCC letter, announced it would drop a similar charge.

The News: Now, 100% Dolphin Safe!

The News: Now, 100% Dolphin Safe!

• Consumer Reports says that due to high levels of mercury, pregnant women should not eat tuna. Plus, those dolphin bits can get stuck in the baby’s umbilical cord. [CT]

Qwest CEO Nacchio to NSA: “Go Screw.”

Qwest CEO Nacchio to NSA: “Go Screw.”

Although doubtlessly guilty of insider trading, former Qwest CEO Joe Nacchio has one moral feather tucked beneath the diamond-encrusted ribbon of his Mr. Moneybags-style top hat: when the NSA approached Nacchio and demanded Qwest phone records to stave off the terrorist threat, Nacchio told them to go fuck themselves. This is while executives at companies like Verizon, AT&T and Bell South gleefully capitulated to what amounts to an illegal and unconstitutional request.

‘Broadband Scandal': How the Phone Companies Screwed Us All

A new book called The $200 Billion Broadband Scandal claims to detail the variety of tax breaks and compensations offered to the Bell-spawned phone companies to build out our nation’s fiber-optic network—a network designed to bring 45-megabit per second connections into every home. We don’t know about you, but we are sending this text via a rickety old copper line, using the best 1-megabitish DSL connection Verizon has to offer.