(Eric Arnold)

VW Buyback Plan Seems More Likely As Company Struggles To Find Fix For Emission-Cheating Vehicles

Since Volkswagen admitted last year to using “defeat devices” in certain cars to cheat on emissions tests, some owners and consumer advocates have pushed for the carmaker to buy back affected vehicles from customers. VW had resisted this idea, but without any other resolution in the offing, a mass buyback offer is beginning to look possible.
[More]

Takata Airbag Recall Increases By 5 Million, Ninth U.S. Death Reported

Takata Airbag Recall Increases By 5 Million, Ninth U.S. Death Reported

The December death of a Georgia man prompted federal regulators to increase by five million the number of vehicles recalled because of defective Takata airbags that can shoot shrapnel at drivers and passengers upon deployment.  [More]

VW Expands “Goodwill Package” To Include 3-Liter Vehicles That Evade Emissions Standards

VW Expands “Goodwill Package” To Include 3-Liter Vehicles That Evade Emissions Standards

Back in November, Volkswagen announced a “goodwill package” of cash and credit intended to placate some owners of supposed “clean diesel” cars that were rigged to cheat emissions tests. Now the company is expanding this offer to include owners of 3-liter diesel cars from VW, Audi, and Porsche. [More]

(Eric Arnold)

Volkswagen CEO: We Are Not Crooks

While Volkswagen is currently the target of numerous civil lawsuits — including one filed last week by the federal government  — there is still the possibility VW could face criminal charges. But the company’s CEO contends that no real crime was actually committed. [More]

VW Reportedly Considering Buying Back More Than 50,000 Emissions-Cheating Cars In The U.S.

VW Reportedly Considering Buying Back More Than 50,000 Emissions-Cheating Cars In The U.S.

Volkswagen may buy back tens of thousands of vehicles in the United States if the company can’t find an easy way to remove “defeat devices” that allow the cars to evade emissions standards.  [More]

(Chauncer)

VW Emissions Scandal The Result Of “Chain Of Mistakes” That Started In 2005

The emissions scandal affecting more than 11 million Volkswagen, Audi and Porsche vehicles around the world likely started in 2005 when engineers initiated a “chain of mistakes” while trying to meet nitrogen-oxide emissions standards in their new line of diesel vehicles, executives for the company said on Thursday.  [More]

Emissions-Cheating “Defeat Devices” Found In Additional VW, Audi, Porsche Vehicles

Emissions-Cheating “Defeat Devices” Found In Additional VW, Audi, Porsche Vehicles

The emission-scandal plot continues to thicken for Volkswagen and U.S. regulators. Nearly a month after the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board accused the carmaker of including “defeat devices” in an additional 10,000 previously unreported vehicles, investigators for the agency say the number of cars is significantly higher.  [More]

Lawmakers Call For VW To Buy Back Emission-Cheating Cars At Pre-Scandal Value

Lawmakers Call For VW To Buy Back Emission-Cheating Cars At Pre-Scandal Value

Despite nearly a quarter of the 482,000 owners of Volkswagen vehicles equipped with “defeat devices” accepting a “goodwill package” of $1,000 in cash and credits for their troubles, lawmakers said on Thursday that the carmaker needs to do more – namely buy back the automobiles that violate federal air pollution emission standards.  [More]

The 2016 3.0 liter diesel-powered Audi A6 is included in VW latest stop-sale order.

Dealers Stop Sale Of New, Pre-Owned VW, Audi & Porsche Vehicles Covered In Latest Emissions Violations

Just a day after Volkswagen executives said the car company would not stop the sale of vehicles included in the Environmental Protection Agency’s newest notice of violation for emission standards, the manufacturer backtracked, and now says it will tell dealers not to sell certain VW, Audi and Porsche models.  [More]

VW Denies Latest Emissions Violations, Won’t Halt Sales On Affected Vehicles

VW Denies Latest Emissions Violations, Won’t Halt Sales On Affected Vehicles

Just hours after federal and state regulators accused Volkswagen of using so-called “defeat devices” on newer model cars in order to ensure they passed emissions tests, the carmaker said the allegations aren’t true and that it will continue to allow sales of the recently identified automobiles.  [More]

Regulators Find More “Defeat Devices” In 10,000 VW, Porsche And Audi Vehicles

Regulators Find More “Defeat Devices” In 10,000 VW, Porsche And Audi Vehicles

A month and a half after the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board found “defeat devices” designed to cheat emission tests in nearly 500,000 Volkswagen and Audi vehicles, the agencies’ ongoing investigation found additional Clean Air Act violations in the carmaker’s newer model Porsche, Audi and VW cars.  [More]

Federal Trade Commission Opens Probe Into Volkswagen’s “Clean Diesel” Advertising

Federal Trade Commission Opens Probe Into Volkswagen’s “Clean Diesel” Advertising

The list of state and federal agencies probing Volkswagen’s recent emissions scandal grew by one Wednesday: The Federal Trade Commission announced it has opened an investigation into the company’s advertisements that touted “clean diesel” vehicles, despite the fact the cars contained “defeat devices,” which are designed to cheat emissions tests. [More]

Report: Volkswagen Knew Of “Defeat Devices” Eight Years Before EPA Action

Report: Volkswagen Knew Of “Defeat Devices” Eight Years Before EPA Action

An internal review spurred by the emissions scandal that has engulfed Volkswagen over the past week found that the carmaker knew that so-called “defeat devices,” used to trick emissions tests, were used in more than 11 million VW and 2.1 million Audi diesel vehicles for several years before the Environmental Protection Agency issued a violation notice to the manufacturer ordering it to recall some 500,000 sedans[More]

Audi Confirms 2.1 Million Vehicles Affected By Volkswagen Emissions Scandal

Audi Confirms 2.1 Million Vehicles Affected By Volkswagen Emissions Scandal

For more than a week, Volkswagen has been the center of an emissions scandal in which it admitted that nearly 11 million diesel engine vehicles worldwide come equipped with software that tricked emissions tests. While an order of violation from the Environmental Protection Agency included several Audi sedans, VW had yet to announce just how many of those vehicles were affected worldwide. Now we know: 2.1 million. [More]

(Eric Arnold)

EPA Overhauling Emissions Tests To Catch “Defeat Device” Cheaters

A week after ordering Volkswagen to recall 500,000 vehicles that contain “defeat devices” designed to cheat emissions tests, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it would overhaul its compliance processes to ensure vehicles meet standards not only in controlled environments but in real-world driving conditions. [More]

VW Previously Recalled Some Vehicles Over Emissions Standards

VW Previously Recalled Some Vehicles Over Emissions Standards

Five months before Volkswagen was ordered by federal regulators to recall nearly 500,000 sedans that equipped with software that tricked emissions tests, the company sent notices to some owners that their cars were in need of an “emissions service action.” [More]

VW Announces 11M Cars Affected Worldwide By Software That Evades Emissions Standards

VW Announces 11M Cars Affected Worldwide By Software That Evades Emissions Standards

While the Environmental Protection Agency ordered Volkswagen to recall nearly 500,000 sedans equipped with software that tricked emissions tests, the carmaker announced on Tuesday that more than 11 million vehicles actually include the so-called defeat device. [More]

Yes, Owners Of Recalled Volkswagens Can File Deceptive Marketing Complaints With The FTC

Yes, Owners Of Recalled Volkswagens Can File Deceptive Marketing Complaints With The FTC

While Volkswagen and the EPA say the recently recalled VW and Audi diesel cars are safe to drive while waiting for the problem to be fixed, a number of car owners feel like they were tricked by the company’s “clean diesel” branding and slogans like “this ain’t your daddy’s diesel.” So what can these consumers do? One option is to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. [More]