FDA Tests Confirm Presence Of Arsenic In Rice Products

FDA Tests Confirm Presence Of Arsenic In Rice Products

Almost exactly one year after our cohorts at Consumer Reports found arsenic in a wide range of rice products — from instant rice to baby food to rice milk to cereal — the Food and Drug Administration has released the results of its own research on the topic, effectively confirming CR’s findings and suggestion that consumers vary the types of grains they eat. [More]

(smohundro)

Arsenic Found In Hundreds Of Beer Samples But Hey, That’s What Makes It So Sparkly!

When it comes to beer, there’s plenty of appeal — “It tastes good!” “It makes me feel warm inside!*” “I don’t feel so bad about whatsisface dumping me anymore!” and so on and so forth. And then there’s that clear, sparkling liquid, unsullied by nary a speck of cloudiness. But the filtration process that gives beer that clarity could be the reason researchers are finding arsenic in hundreds of samples of the stuff. [More]

So There's Arsenic In My Rice… What Can I Do About It?

So There's Arsenic In My Rice… What Can I Do About It?

Earlier today, we told you about the Consumer Reports study that found varying levels of inorganic arsenic — a known carcinogen — in a wide variety of rice products. Since so many of us chow down on rice in some form on a regular basis, should we be worried? [More]

Consumer Reports Investigation Finds Arsenic In Variety Of Rice Products

Consumer Reports Investigation Finds Arsenic In Variety Of Rice Products

Rice is one flexible little grain. It’s found in cereal (hot and cold), baby food, rice cakes, crackers, pasta, vinegar, syrup, flour and beverages. But a new Consumer Reports study of 60 rice products found varying levels of no one’s favorite ingredient: Arsenic. [More]

Lawmakers Announce Legislation To Set Limits On Arsenic & Lead In Fruit Juice

In the wake of a recent Consumer Reports investigation that found high levels of arsenic and lead in a number of fruit juices, Congressman Frank Pallone of New Jersey and Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro today announced the “Arsenic Prevention and Protection from Lead Exposure in Juice (APPLE Juice) Act of 2012,” which would require the Food and Drug Administration to set standards for arsenic and lead in fruit juices. [More]

EPA Announces New Standards To Reduce Mercury Contamination From Power Plant Emissions

EPA Announces New Standards To Reduce Mercury Contamination From Power Plant Emissions

This morning, the Environmental Protection Agency announced its new Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, a set of national regulations aimed at reducing power plant emissions of mercury and toxic air pollution like arsenic, acid gas, nickel, selenium, and cyanide. [More]

High Arsenic & Lead Levels In Juice: What Parents Should Do About It

High Arsenic & Lead Levels In Juice: What Parents Should Do About It

After our wise older siblings at Consumer Reports published an investigation into apple and grape juice, finding high levels of arsenic and lead levels in a concerning percentage of samples, parents should know what actions to take to keep their children healthy. [More]

Consumer Reports Study Finds High Levels Of Arsenic & Lead In Some Fruit Juice

Consumer Reports Study Finds High Levels Of Arsenic & Lead In Some Fruit Juice

While federal standards set limits for the amount of arsenic and lead in tap and bottled water, but no such hard line exists for fruit juices, even though such drinks are dietary staples of children. Thus, our cousins-in-arms at Consumer Reports set to testing some juices, only to turn up results that should cause concern among parents and lawmakers. [More]

There's Arsenic In The Apple Juice

There's Arsenic In The Apple Juice

With all the things on your mind, the last thing you need to worry about is whether the apple juice you finally convinced your kid to drink has arsenic in it. But an independent lab test of several different brands of apple juice, sponsored by Food & Water Watch and Empire State Consumer Project found a sample of Mott’s Apple Juice contained 55 parts per billion of arsenic, exceeding the EPA tolerance level of 10 parts per billion. The FDA does not have a set tolerance level for juice. [More]