Tell Trader Joe's you'd rather have your meat sans antibiotics.

Trader Joe’s Fans Ask Store To Stop Selling Drugged-Up Meat

Trader Joe’s has a lot of fans who evangelize on behalf of the food and service at the grocery store chain, but some of those same superfans are asking their favorite food fix to please stop selling meat full of antibiotics. [More]

Why 'Antibiotic-Free' Meat Doesn't Mean What You Think It Does

Why 'Antibiotic-Free' Meat Doesn't Mean What You Think It Does

Antibiotic-resistant infections are a serious and scary threat to public health. One reason why devious bacteria are evolving to resist antibiotics is the widespread overuse of them in both humans and in animals. A Center for Science in the Public Interest analysis of Food and Drug Administration data shows that 80% of all antibiotics administered are to animals, and not to help them get better when they’re ill. Meat and dairy producers give low doses to the critters in their care in order to prevent illness, and sometimes to promote faster growth. [More]

Study Links Popular Antibiotic Zithromax To Rare But Deadly Heart Risk

Study Links Popular Antibiotic Zithromax To Rare But Deadly Heart Risk

Many people use the antibiotic Zithromax, or azithromycin, to treat bronchitis and other common infections. Some surprising results of a 14-year study might turn some off the antibiotic, as it found the risk of sudden deadly heart problems increased with use of Zithromax. [More]

Court Orders FDA To Investigate Use Of Antibiotics In Animal Feed

Court Orders FDA To Investigate Use Of Antibiotics In Animal Feed

Back in 1977, the FDA proposed a ban on putting penicillin and other antibiotics in animal feed solely for the purpose of promoting growth. Amazingly, that proposal has been gathering dust long enough to begin losing its hair and regretting its life choices. That is until yesterday, when a federal court ordered the FDA to finish what it started 35 years ago. [More]

FDA Bans "Extra-Label" Uses Of Popular Class Of Antibiotics On Farm Animals

FDA Bans "Extra-Label" Uses Of Popular Class Of Antibiotics On Farm Animals

For those of you who are concerned about the amount of antibiotics being given to the cows, chickens, pigs and turkeys that provide (or end up as) the food on your plate, here’s some good news. The Food and Drug Administration has announced a new regulation that prohibits “extra-label” uses of a popular class of antibiotics. [More]

FDA To Farmers: Enough Already With All The Antibiotics

FDA To Farmers: Enough Already With All The Antibiotics

After coming to the conclusion that farmers have gone a little hog-wild with their use of antimicrobials — not to cure animals of disease, but to spur animal growth — the FDA has kindly asked them to cut it out because it’s just going to make the rest of us sicker. [More]

Tyson Chicken Settles Class-Action Suit, Will Pay $4.4 Million To Consumers

Tyson Chicken Settles Class-Action Suit, Will Pay $4.4 Million To Consumers

If you bought Tyson chicken from 2007 to 2009, you may want to start keeping tabs on the new settlement being considered by Tyson to settle the class-action suit against it. The agreement was filed earlier this week, and a review is scheduled for tomorrow. If approved, approximately $4.4 million will supposedly be available to disburse to consumers. [More]

Who's Watching Our Nation's Honey Imports? Pretty Much No One

Who's Watching Our Nation's Honey Imports? Pretty Much No One

The Seattle P.I. reports that “two-thirds of the honey Americans consume is imported and almost half of that, regardless of what’s on the label, comes from China.” The first problem with that is some Chinese honey is “tainted with banned antibiotics” such as ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. The second problem, according to U.S. honey producers who are upset about the lack of oversight, is that whenever contaminated honey is discovered, many companies just sent it back to the importer and never tell the FDA—which means it can be resold elsewhere, including to other U.S. packers.

11 Cheap Generic Drug Programs That Will Save You Money

11 Cheap Generic Drug Programs That Will Save You Money

Here at the Consumerist we’d like you to save money. That’s why we’ve put together a handy list of those $4 generic drug programs that you’ve been hearing about. We hope this list will make it easier for you to locate the store that has the best deal on all your medications. If your local grocery store is doing a similar program and we missed it, please add a link to the comments. If you need help researching the medicines, we recommend Consumer Reports’ excellent site Best Buy Drugs. Enjoy!

Court: Tyson Can No Longer Claim Chickens Are "Raised Without Antibiotics"

Tyson Foods has 14 days to stop claiming that their chickens are “raised without antibiotics.” The deceptive nationwide campaign was brought to an end after rivals Sanderson Farms and Purdue filed suit claiming that all three poultry processors use antibiotics, and that Tyson was trying to steal an undeserved appearance of health.

Teenager Discovers Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria In Chicken

Teenager Discovers Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria In Chicken

A 17-year-old student in New Zealand has discovered antibiotic resistant bacteria that could be difficult to treat in humans… in a bunch of grocery store chickens.

Publix Offers 7 Types Of Antibiotics For Free

Publix Offers 7 Types Of Antibiotics For Free

Fourteen-day supplies of the seven drugs, among the most commonly prescribed, will be available at all 684 of the chain’s pharmacies in five states. Publix said it is not limiting the number of prescriptions that customers may fill for free.

Health Care Plans to Kill You

In less than five paragraphs, Stay Free Magazine’s “How Hip Health Plan Breeds Superbugs” chillingly describes the nightmare plutopia in which we currently live—a world where not only are you chipperly reamed for twice the cost of your sinus medication, but are also softened up like veal for the slurping protuberances of a hyper-immune race of super bacteria.

No, the reason HIP covers less than a full supply is because it wants two co-payments out of me. At $30 each, that makes the drug $60. This not only makes the drug unduly expensive, but it encourages patients not to take their full course of antibiotics…. which, if you know anything about antibiotics, is dangerous from a public health perspective, because it can lead to drug-resistant bacteria.

Which, of course, is HIP’s entire insidious plot. A pallid, gel-like population of wheezing mouth breathers ridden through the streets by antibiotic junky bacteria jonesin’ for a fix. And who are these superbugs? As any reader who is familiar with the direct-to-video oeuvre of Brian Yuzna in the early 90′s will be quick to realize, these are the board of directors of HIP Healthcare itself.