(Mark.JPEG)

Steve Jobs Called The Competition With Google’s Android System A “Holy War”

How devoted was the late Steve Jobs to the company he co-founded? Devoted enough for him to liken Apple’s competition with Google’s Android operating system to a “holy war,” according to emails unearthed by Samsung’s lawyers as part of the Korean company’s legal fight against Apple. [More]

(steakpinball)

Apple And Samsung Back In Court For Round Eleventy Billion Of Their Legal Fight

What’s happened once has happened before, and will happen again. Whether or not you ascribe to that kind of Battlestar Galactica/Rust Cohle on True Detective life view, it certainly feels like seeing Apple and Samsung in the legal ring again was inevitable. We’re on about round eleventy billion, give or take an eleventy, as the two head back to court today in a dustup over patents. Again. [More]

(The NExt Web)

Most Apps Mobile Users Purchase Are Free

This piece of news will surprise absolutely no one: most smartphone and tablet applications that consumers purchase are free to download. Not free to use, necessarily, thanks to in-app purchases and upgrades, but free to download. Analysis by Statista for the Wall Street Journal shows that the consumers who spend the most on apps are iPad users, who shell out an average of fifty cents each for apps.

[More]

Google Sued Over Kids’ In-App Currency Purchases

Google Sued Over Kids’ In-App Currency Purchases

While the folks at Apple have already settled civil and regulatory complaints about in-app purchase policies that allowed children to run up huge bills on their parents’ accounts, the Google Play store has only recently come under scrutiny for its allegedly lax controls. Now, a mom in New York has filed a potential class action against the Internet giant, claiming its policies encourage kids to waste their parents’ money. [More]

(CNN)

Too Much Of A Good Thing? ‘Flappy Bird’ Developer Pulls Game After Surge Of Success

Anyone who’s ever eaten an entire cake in one sitting knows that yes, it is possible for there to be too much of a good thing. And that goes for inedible things as well: The sudden success of mobile game Flappy Bird appears to have been too overwhelming for its developer, who pulled the mega popular game from app stores yesterday say he just “cannot take this anymore.” [More]

EA Doesn’t Really Want People Sharing Negative Game Reviews Where Someone Might Read Them

EA Doesn’t Really Want People Sharing Negative Game Reviews Where Someone Might Read Them

It’s almost time to start thinking about this year’s Worst Company In America tournament, which can mean only one thing — two-time reigning WCIA champ Electronic Arts is once again making a final push to be hated by its own customers. This time, the video game giant has been caught apparently trying to game the Google Play review and ratings system. [More]

(Mike Matney)

What’s The NSA Using To Spy On You Now? Angry Birds.

The revelations about just how embedded into every facet of modern, technological life the NSA is just keep coming. The spy agency isn’t just collecting calling records and tracking electronics; they’re in your iPhone games, too. [More]

South Korea Has Outlawed Bloatware On Smartphones

South Korea Has Outlawed Bloatware On Smartphones

While Apple has long prevented wireless companies from force-placing cruddy, memory- and battery-sucking apps on its iPhones, most Android users have phones loaded with apps from their wireless providers and phone manufacturers that will probably never be used but which can’t be removed. Realizing that this is a mammoth annoyance to consumers, regulators in South Korea have banned the practice. [More]

Maker Of Wildly Popular Flashlight App Failed To Tell Users It Was Sharing Their Location Info

Maker Of Wildly Popular Flashlight App Failed To Tell Users It Was Sharing Their Location Info

Most of us have had the bright idea to use our smartphones as flashlights when searching underneath the couch or in the backseat of a dark car. And many millions of people have downloaded flashlight apps that maximize the light coming out of their devices. Most of those people probably never even considered that a flashlight app would be doing anything other than turning on the phone’s lights, and certainly not transmitting location data to third parties. [More]

Drones, Shmones: Google Is Building An Army Of Androids That Don’t Fall When You Kick’em

Drones, Shmones: Google Is Building An Army Of Androids That Don’t Fall When You Kick’em

While we’ve all got our eyes in the sky waiting for the robot revolution to start with Amazon (and burrito) drones, we must not be distracted by the threat on the ground. By threat I mean intelligent, walking, talking robots. Or more fittingly for Google, which quietly snapped up seven technology companies, androids. [More]

FCC Android App Lets You Test Wireless Broadband Speeds

FCC Android App Lets You Test Wireless Broadband Speeds

In an effort to include more wireless data in its periodic reports on the state of broadband in America, the Federal Communications Commission has released an Android app that lets consumers test the speed and quality of their wireless provider (and of course shares that data with the FCC). [More]

How The Heck Do I Decide Whether The New iPads Are What I Want?

How The Heck Do I Decide Whether The New iPads Are What I Want?

While the smartphone market has become much more diverse in recent years, Apple’s iPad still dominates the tablet business in the U.S. Today, the company announced the latest iteration of the full-sized iPad — the iPad Air — along with an improved iPad Mini, hoping to continue this dominance. But many consumers aren’t fully informed of how these devices compare to already available Android and Windows tablets. [More]

Microsoft Finally Takes Head Out Of Sand, Opens Up Xbox Music To Android, iOS

Nearly a year after replacing its failed Zune music store with Xbox Music, Microsoft has finally come around to the realization that the service, which only worked on computers and wireless devices running Windows operating systems, wasn’t going to convince people to drop their Galaxy S4s, iPhones, iPads, or Kindle Fires. The company announced today that Xbox Music is now available for use on iOS and Android devices, and that web-based streaming is no longer relegated to computers running Windows 8 or RT. [via PCmag.com]

(Skakerman)

Software Update Turns Nexus 4 Into Expensive, Slippery Paperweight

There was nothing earth-shattering or all that new about the newest update to the Android mobile operating system, Jelly Bean 4.3. However, some owners of the device that Google itself designed and sells directly, the Nexus 4 smartphone, report that the update turned their phones into glossy paperweights, and it’s not clear why. [More]

Google Says No (For Now) To Facial Recognition Apps For Glass

Google Says No (For Now) To Facial Recognition Apps For Glass

As consumers test Google’s Glass device on the streets and subways of America, many people have raised privacy concerns about the possibility of developers creating facial recognition apps for the wearable computers. But Google is trying to calm those fears by saying it won’t allow such apps… for the time-being. [More]

Google Thinking About How To Let Users Cherry-Pick App Permissions

Google Thinking About How To Let Users Cherry-Pick App Permissions

When you download an app from the Google Play store — or when an update to an already downloaded app includes a change in permissions — users are required to accept those permissions before downloading. But there is no way to say no to any single permission, so users are either begrudgingly downloading apps with permissions they don’t want or not downloading otherwise acceptable apps because they are concerned about these permissions. But one Google engineer says there may be some hope. [More]

If you want to Hangout on your AT&T Android phone, you will probably need a wifi connection.

AT&T Customers Will Probably Have To Wait Before Using Google Hangouts Over Cellular

If you’ve got an Android phone, you might have noticed that your pre-loaded Google Talk app has recently been updated and is now “Hangouts,” the name of Google’s video chat service. But if you’re an AT&T customer, you might have to wait a while before you’re allowed to use that app over the carrier’s wireless network. [More]

Facebook Home Earning Oodles Of Negative Feedback From Google Play Reviewers

Facebook Home Earning Oodles Of Negative Feedback From Google Play Reviewers

Earlier this month, Facebook announced Facebook Home, the massive upgrade of its Android smartphone app that basically puts the social networking site front-and-center on your device. The app began rolling out to customers late last week, and some of the responses may have you waiting to press “update.” [More]