Thanks Lenovo! Without your sponsorship the world might not have this story on the "rise of the social supermodel."

Why Do Websites Refuse To Label Sponsored Content As “Advertising”?

Looking back at our breakdowns of so-called “native advertising,” the ad-world terminology for an advertisement made to look like a news story, you may have noticed that these execrable, nauseating (but profitable) ads were labeled things like “Sponsored by…,” or “Promoted,” or the blatantly vague “From our partners,” but none of them simply said “advertisement.” And the people who make money off this insidious nonsense say there’s a good reason. [More]

(donbuciak)

San Francisco Officials Considering A Health Warning On Ads For Sodas, Sugary Drinks

Although a proposed tax on sodas and sugary drinks didn’t fly in San Francisco, officials are now mulling the idea of slapping a health warning on advertisements appearing within the city limits for sugary beverages. [More]

Amazon Now Selling Ad Space On Shipping Boxes

Amazon Now Selling Ad Space On Shipping Boxes

Amazon has been using its boxes to advertise its own products and services for years, but now the e-commerce giant is realizing that there might be some money to be made by shipping customers’ packages in cartons branded by paying advertisers. [More]

Roofing Company Sends Me A Postcard Of My Own House

Roofing Company Sends Me A Postcard Of My Own House

Rebekah received an advertising flyer in the mail recently from a local roofing company. It was addressed to “Current Resident,” and she glanced at it before throwing it away. Wait…that house printed on the postcard looked familiar. It was her house. Unnerved, she sent the postcard over to us, asking, “Is this common?” [More]

Advertisers Can Now Add Action Buttons Like “Shop Now” To Instagram Ads

Advertisers Can Now Add Action Buttons Like “Shop Now” To Instagram Ads

The days of an ad-free Instagram are long gone, lost in the pre-Facebook ownership days, so it might be no surprise that the photo-and-video-sharing social media app will now feature ads that let viewers take action beyond liking or commenting on them. [More]

(cookedphotos)

Netflix Testing Teasers For Its Original Shows, No Plans To Introduce Third-Party Ads

After some Netflix subscribers started seeing teaser ads playing either before or after the company’s original programming, the streaming video service has confirmed that yes, it’s testing teasers — only featuring its own shows, before or after its own shows — but no, it won’t be introducing any third-party ads. [More]

John Oliver Pledges To Eat McDonald’s, Drink Budweiser If They Use Sponsorship Power To Change FIFA

John Oliver Pledges To Eat McDonald’s, Drink Budweiser If They Use Sponsorship Power To Change FIFA

Last week, the soccer world was rocked when numerous current and former FIFA officials were arrested and charged with accepting illegal kickbacks and bribes. Only days later, FIFA President Sepp Blatter, under whose oversight these alleged crimes have occurred for nearly two decades, was reelected. That’s why John Oliver has called on FIFA’s high-profile sponsors to use their financial leverage to effect some change in the most powerful soccer organization in the world. [More]

Soon ads like this one that play before YouTube videos will allow viewers to easily buy the promoted product.

Soon You’ll Be Able To Easily Buy The Stuff Showcased In Ads Played Before YouTube Videos

Have you ever sat through an advertisement before being able to watch that super cool, totally in-the-moment viral video on YouTube, and thought “Man, I really need that [insert random item you probably don’t need]?” No? Okay, but in case that ever is you, Google wants to ensure it’s as easy as possible for you to make a purchase right then and there. [More]

The groups contend that the YouTube Kids app search function shows inappropriate material for children.

YouTube Kids Accused Of Running Beer Ads, Crotch-Grabbing Lessons, Wine-Tasting Tips

Since Google launched the YouTube Kids app in February, the service has come under fire from consumer advocates for its advertising practices. Now, instead of focusing on the commercials shown through the service, several of those same groups are raising concerns with federal regulators over what they call disturbing and potentially harmful content for young children to view. [More]

This image from the Mad Men finale has nothing to do with Coca-Cola. We just love Stan's style.

Coca-Cola Says It Didn’t Pay For Placement In Mad Men Finale

If you haven’t watched the series finale of Mad Men, then you really shouldn’t be reading a story about the series finale of Mad Men. And if you continue reading this story about the series finale of Mad Men, don’t get angry at us for giving away what happens in the final moments of the series finale of Mad Men. [More]

That Was Then, This Is Now: How 72 Brands From ‘Mad Men’ Have Changed Since Don Draper Was In Charge

AMC

Because nothing gold can stay, AMC’s popular Mad Men has reached the final episode of its final, seventh season. Over the course of the show, we’ve seen pitches for a multitude of companies, brands, sports, groups and even cities. While some of those brands were created for the show, the large majority were very real — and some continue to exist today. In the spirit of nostalgia, we thought now might be the right time to check in on those products and companies pitched by Sterling Cooper (and its various rebirths), to see which have been lost to the mists of time, and which still remain. [More]

Verizon/AOL Merger: Good For Their Business, Bad For Your Privacy

Verizon/AOL Merger: Good For Their Business, Bad For Your Privacy

Every day, the great amorphous mass of consumers creates millions upon millions of trackable, quantifiable pieces of data. Every purchase at every store. Every click on every website, every bit of geotagged data, every installed or opened app and every interaction on social media. All of it adds up together into one giant Mount Everest of data to be sliced, diced, bought, sold, and traded. [More]

Verizon Buys AOL For $4.4 Billion To Create Video Content, Ad-Sharing Mega-Company

Verizon Buys AOL For $4.4 Billion To Create Video Content, Ad-Sharing Mega-Company

Old tech and new tech are coming together in a massive $4.4 billion deal, with mobile service powerhouse Verizon Communications buying the brand of the ’90s AOL — a deal that gives the country’s largest mobile phone operator a stronger foothold in the race to create ad-content that targets customers as they move from desktops to mobile devices. [More]

Uber Discouraging Drivers From Using In-Car Advertising Services

Uber Discouraging Drivers From Using In-Car Advertising Services

While some taxi services are using every available square inch of their cars to advertise to passengers and the public, Uber cars have remained ad-free thus far. Some Uber drivers had hoped to make some extra cash through in-car marketing, but the ride-sharing service is saying no.
[More]

Exec Behind Nationwide’s “Dead Boy” Super Bowl Ad Steps Down

Exec Behind Nationwide’s “Dead Boy” Super Bowl Ad Steps Down

Not too many ads from the most recent Super Bowl will be remembered years from now, perhaps with the exception of the Nationwide insurance commercial that was instantly dubbed the “dead boy” ad by the Internet, because… well, the star of the spot is an adorable moppet who also happens to be dead. Now the Nationwide exec who signed off the infamous commercial has stepped down from his top-level job at the insurance giant. [More]

These Google search results may look normal at first glance, but if you look closely, you'll see that these ads are being "injected" into the page by a third party.

“Injected Ads” Are An Annoying Security Risk Affecting Millions Of Internet Users

Legitimate advertising is an annoyance that most of us tolerate and do our best to ignore. But there are more pernicious forms of advertising that aren’t just a nuisance but actually pose a potential security risk, like the “injected ads” that find your way into your web browser through software and extensions. [More]

Philip Morris International Uses Copyright Claims To Quiet Marlboro Critics

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Earlier this year, John Oliver thrust Philip Morris International — the New York-based cigarette giant that markets Marlboro and other brands in hundreds of countries outside the U.S. — into the spotlight for its questionable legal efforts to delay and block tobacco regulation around the globe. And this morning, the company used copyright claims to have videos posted by critics of Marlboro removed from the Internet. [More]

Google Wants To Use Your E-Mail Address To Provide Targeted Advertising

Google Wants To Use Your E-Mail Address To Provide Targeted Advertising

If you’re a Gmail user, or one of the millions of workers whose employer now uses Gmail as their email platform, you could soon be seeing new ads targeted directly at you in your Google search results. [More]