Want Wired.com Without Ads? That’ll Be $3.99/Month

Want Wired.com Without Ads? That’ll Be $3.99/Month

With billions and billions of ad dollars going unearned by websites each year because of the increase use of ad-blocking technology, it’s no wonder that some publishers are fighting back. Last year, magazine giant Conde Nast started erecting virtual walls to prevent ad-block users from visiting some of its sites, and now the company is going to try to give these anti-ad readers the option of a monthly access model for Wired.com. [More]

Wendy’s Ditching “Now That’s Better” Motto For Something “Deliciously Different”

Wendy’s Ditching “Now That’s Better” Motto For Something “Deliciously Different”

While McDonald’s and Burger King have dominated the fast food slogan wars over the years with memorable phrases like “You deserve a break today,” and “Have it your way,” Wendy’s hasn’t really had a hit since the “Where’s the beef?” mania of the 1980s. But that hasn’t stopped the company from trying, as it ditches “Now that’s better” for the new “Deliciously different.”
[More]

NBC To Get In On That Thursday Night Football Lovin’

NBC To Get In On That Thursday Night Football Lovin’

For the last couple of seasons, CBS has been — with the exception of Thanksgiving night — the NFL’s sole dance partner on Thursday nights. But starting next season, CBS will have to get used to the idea of the league spending time romancing another “friend” — NBC. [More]

(Ann Fisher)

1/3 Of American Adults Use Online Ad-Blockers, Few Publishers Try To Stop Them

If you’re one of the approximately 1/3 of American Internet users who employ an ad-blocker in your web browser, we don’t mind, because Consumerist doesn’t accept advertising. Other websites that do depend on ads for their income definitely do mind that customers are using ad-blockers, but they don’t really do anything to stop users. Why is that? [More]

San Francisco Wants High-Rise Verizon And Visa Ads To Come Down Before Super Bowl

San Francisco Wants High-Rise Verizon And Visa Ads To Come Down Before Super Bowl

With visitors coming to town for a high-profile sporting event next week, two high-rise buildings in San Francisco sold exterior ad space to Verizon and to Visa. There’s a problem, though: the ads, which are 15 and seven stories high respectively, are illegal, and the city wants them to come down before the Super Bowl. [More]

(Louis Abate)

Nearly 90% Of Millennials Can’t Stop Looking At Their Phones When Watching TV

When you watch TV, is your phone always within reach? More importantly, are you just listening to the TV while you fiddle around on your phone, tablet, laptop, smartwatch, web-connected crockpot? If so, then you’re like the 88% of millennials who are regularly using “second screens” while watching video. [More]

Clooney on the left, Not-Clooney on the right.

Nespresso Suing Coffee Competitor For Using George Clooney Doppelgänger In Ads

There is only one actor named George Clooney shilling for an espresso company, and Nespresso wants to make sure consumers know he’s only working for them: the company’s Israel arm is suing a rival for using an actor who looks somewhat like the salt-and-pepper Clooney in ads, claiming it’ll confuse customers. [More]

“Buy Here, Pay Here” Dealer To Return $700K To Consumers Over Deceptive Lending Practices

“Buy Here, Pay Here” Dealer To Return $700K To Consumers Over Deceptive Lending Practices

Federal regulators continued their crackdown on not-so-upfront “buy-here, pay-here” auto dealers today, ordering a Colorado-based dealer to pay nearly $1 million in restitution and fines for operating an abusive financing scheme.  [More]

Taco Bell Will Reportedly Use Super Bowl To Announce Year-Old “Quesalupa” Idea

Taco Bell Will Reportedly Use Super Bowl To Announce Year-Old “Quesalupa” Idea

It’s been a year since we first got wind of the Taco Bell “Quesalupa” — or as Conan O’Brien put it, the “case of lupus” — and 11 months since the company began testing the vaguely taco-like object (complete with a soft, cheese-stuffed shell) in Dayton, Ohio. Now it looks like the Bell is set to unleash this menu item nationwide. [More]

Tiffany Reminds Consumers (And Costco) That Their Brand Isn’t Just A Setting Name

Tiffany Reminds Consumers (And Costco) That Their Brand Isn’t Just A Setting Name

A few months ago, a federal judge found in favor of Tiffany in a years-long dispute between the jeweler and warehouse club Costco. At issue was the name “Tiffany,” which the warehouse club was using as a generic term to describe a style of ring, and the jeweler claims as its brand identity. Now a new ad campaign from Tiffany is nominally aimed at brides, but might as well be mailed straight to Costco’s lawyers. [More]

Twitter Reportedly Working On Platform That Turns Users’ Tweets Into Ads

Twitter Reportedly Working On Platform That Turns Users’ Tweets Into Ads

Take a quick look at Twitter at any given time and you’re sure to see a slew of brands, or celebrities and other influencers, shilling products and services with short 140-character messages. While promotional Tweets might be easy to spot now, they could be more difficult in the future, as the social media platform is reportedly working on a new product that would turn everyday users’ Tweets into ads for brands.  [More]

Wells Fargo Mocks Minnesota Vikings’ “Photo Bomb” Lawsuit

Wells Fargo Mocks Minnesota Vikings’ “Photo Bomb” Lawsuit

A few weeks back, the Minnesota Vikings sued Wells Fargo, accusing the bank of trying “photo bomb” the team’s new stadium. Wells has since fired back, calling the whole thing “far-fetched.” [More]

As e-cigarette makers increase their ad spending, more teens have started using the devices.

Report Finds That As E-Cigarette Ad Spending Increases So Does Teens’ Use Of The Devices

About 2.4 million teens smoked e-cigarettes last year, and that number is poised to rise, thanks in part to the tens of millions of dollars device manufactures have poured into advertisements for the products, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  [More]

Schefter's Tweet should have been flagged as an ad for Domino's, but someone goofed and failed to mention this sponsorship.

ESPN Admits: Tweets By Adam Schefter & Chris Mortensen Were Unmarked Ads For Domino’s

Plenty of famous people post Tweets, Facebook updates, and Instagram photos where they mention a product or company name that they truly enjoy. But if those celebs are getting paid to slap their name on these messages, they need to be transparent about it. A pair of sportscasters at ESPN apparently missed that memo when they recently name-dropped Domino’s Pizza on Twitter. [More]

GQ Website Gives Ultimatum To Readers: Disable Ad-Blockers Or Pay Up

GQ Website Gives Ultimatum To Readers: Disable Ad-Blockers Or Pay Up

With ad-blocking apps and plugins preventing U.S. content companies from earning some $22 billion a year off your eyeballs, some sites are throwing down the gauntlet and demanding that readers pay up if they want to avoid ads. [More]

Minnesota Vikings Sue Wells Fargo For Attempting To “Photo Bomb” New Stadium

Minnesota Vikings Sue Wells Fargo For Attempting To “Photo Bomb” New Stadium


When you build a new multibillion-dollar stadium for an NFL franchise, you probably want to make sure that advertisers are paying for their name on or in the building, not just near it. And you probably want to ensure that those advertisers who do pay for their name on the building aren’t being overshadowed by the neighbors. Which is why the Minnesota Vikings are suing Wells Fargo. [More]

Full Disclosure: Neither Butterfinger nor Simon & Garfunkel paid to be advertised in this story. (photo: Renee Rendler-Kaplan)

Feds Clarify When & How Advertisers Need To Reveal They Paid For Sponsored Stories

If you’re reading a website about business travel and you read an interesting news story about saving money on hotels, does it matter to you if that “article” was paid for by an advertiser? If so, how should that sponsorship be communicated to the reader? [More]

(quinn.anya)

Dairy Crisis Averted: Advertising Group Weighs In On String Cheese War

When there’s a cheese war raging, who’re you gonna call to settle things? If it’s a fight over whether or not a product is being incorrectly advertised, The National Advertising Division (an offshoot of the Council of Better Business Bureaus) often weighs in. This time, it’s addressing a string cheese dispute between two different companies, in the hopes that we can all just relax and enjoy some cheese. [More]