Google Wants To Use Your E-Mail Address To Provide Targeted Advertising

Google Wants To Use Your E-Mail Address To Provide Targeted Advertising

If you’re a Gmail user, or one of the millions of workers whose employer now uses Gmail as their email platform, you could soon be seeing new ads targeted directly at you in your Google search results. [More]

(Revlon)

Florida Movie Theater Apologizes For Playing “Suggestive” Ad Before Family Flick

A Florida movie theater has apologized and pulled a makeup ad that ran before a PG-rated movie after a mother complained and said that the scenes of people putting on lipstick and kissing each other are images better suited to a screening of 50 Shades of Grey. [More]

Coca-Cola Tripling Number Of Names For Next “Share A Coke” Campaign

Coca-Cola Tripling Number Of Names For Next “Share A Coke” Campaign

Last summer, Coca-Cola briefly reversed a decade of sagging sales by slapping a bunch of peoples’ first names on Coke bottles and telling folks to share on social media. And because all follow-ups to successful campaigns must be bigger than the original, the beverage giant is tripling the number of names that will be slapped on bottles when the sequel arrives this summer. [More]

YouTube Kids App Accused Of Deceptive, Excessive Advertising

YouTube Kids App Accused Of Deceptive, Excessive Advertising

It’s only been a few weeks since Google launched its YouTube Kids app targeted at the youngest Internet users, and it’s already taking heat from consumer advocates who are asking federal regulators to investigate whether the service’s advertising practices run afoul of the law. [More]

(Depend)

Depend Attempts To Get Sexy With New Ad Pitch Aimed At The Younger Set

Lest you think wearing Depend undergarments is something the older folks do, the company has set out on a mission to spread what it calls “Underwareness” with a new ad campaign showing younger people, especially women, wearing the the protective skivvies. [More]

Coca-Cola Makes Splash At Final Four With “Drinkable” Coke Zero Billboard

Coca-Cola Makes Splash At Final Four With “Drinkable” Coke Zero Billboard

The whole point of food advertising is to make you crave the product and buy as much of it as you can right then and there. But for this weekend’s Final Four of the NCAA Men’s Basketball tournament, Coca-Cola is showing off a billboard that actually satisfies that craving by dispensing the beverage on the spot. [More]

(pjseeger)

Utah Restaurant Owner Removes Over-Sized Genitalia From Bull Sign After Uproar

The owner of a steakhouse who added an extra-large genital enhancement to the bull on the restaurant’s sign says he’s removing the nether bits that caused a slew of complaints from residents, but he’s not doing it because of the controversy. [More]

(Meneer Dijk)

Study: Alcohol Advertising Grew 400% In 40 Years — But Americans Aren’t Drinking More

Since 1971, advertisers have churned out more and more content dedicated to pushing alcohol in its various forms. But just because we might see a galloping horse promoting beer in slow motion or a fun gang carrying a cooler of malt beverages on a beach every time we turn on the TV, computer or sit staring at a subway ad, that doesn’t mean Americans are drinking more booze than we did 40 years ago, according to a new study. [More]

These Ads Use Infomercial Tropes To Sell Shelter Pets

These Ads Use Infomercial Tropes To Sell Shelter Pets

Pet owners know that domestic animals have many uses around the home. Thousands of years ago, that’s why we welcomed them into our dwellings in the first place, and we’ve come to appreciate them for their other skills as well. Cats were originally welcomed inside to catch vermin, and now they are also alarm clocks and are fur-covered laptop cozies. Dogs now guard our houses and clean up crumbs on the floor. [More]

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

As dominant as it is and has been for decades, TV advertising is something of a crapshoot. Neilsen ratings are still the gold standard for every network out there, especially since they now finally track time-shifted viewing. But Neilsen still uses their own proprietary tech, and works on a sampling basis. In an age when every set-top box and most of the TVs they’re plugged into are themselves net-connected computers, there’s a more granular and accurate way to measure viewers and to advertise to them — and Google’s taking it. [More]

(Drriss & Marrionn)

TV Viewership Down 10%; Industry Blames Streaming Video

Even though many of us have hundreds of channels to choose from on cable or satellite, we’re choosing to watch less live TV. But it’s not just because we’ve all decided to go outside and take up steeplechase; it has a little something to do with the availability of subscription streaming services. [More]

Coca-Cola Pulls Fanta Ad Suggesting Nazi Germany Was “Good Old Times”

Coca-Cola Pulls Fanta Ad Suggesting Nazi Germany Was “Good Old Times”

In a recent video recounting the birth of Fanta soft drinks, Coca-Cola explains that its German operation had trouble getting cola-making ingredients to the country’s bottling plants 75 years ago, leading the bottlers to dream up a beverage they could make without Coca-Cola syrup. Perhaps Coke was hoping people wouldn’t do the math and realize that the reason for the syrup scarcity had a little something to do with the Nazis. [More]

(Abercrombie & Fitch)

The Only Abs You’ll See From Abercrombie & Fitch Now Are On A Cologne Bottle

Gone are the days of college dorm rooms papered entirely in panels from Abercrombie & Fitch bags, with abs, golden, undulating abs as far as the eye could see. After announcing last year that the company would be phasing out the ubiquitous stomach muscles in its ads, now the only six-packs you’ll see are on a bottle of the brand’s cologne. [More]

(Andrew*)

Lawsuit Against Jim Beam Challenges Bourbon’s “Handcrafted” Claim

When it comes to making a name for a brand, the words companies use to describe their products are chosen very carefully for maximum appeal. But the thing is, those words have to be true. Jim Beam is the latest liquor maker to face challenges over its claims that its bourbon is actually “handcrafted.” [More]

(Eric Spiegal)

Cable Channels Speed Up TV Shows To Cram In More Ads

Anyone who’s watched a syndicated TV show on basic cable is already familiar with some methods of trimming the fat off of shows — shorter opening credits, sped-up closing credits that may overlap on-screen ads or the next show — but what you may not have noticed is that some cable networks are actually speeding up shows and movies to squeeze in more commercials. [More]

McDonald’s “Pay With Lovin'” Campaign Doesn’t Result In Any Actual Love For Company

McDonald’s “Pay With Lovin'” Campaign Doesn’t Result In Any Actual Love For Company

Nearly four months ago, when we first got hints that McDonald’s was going to be making a Super Bowl-centered campaign about how “lovin’ is better than hatin'” and other folksiness, we predicted it wouldn’t exactly be well received by consumers. And when it finally rolled out the “Pay with lovin'” campaign, our opinion didn’t really change. Now that this brief, G-droppin’ period has passed, it doesn’t look like people have anymore love for McDonald’s than they did a few months ago. [More]

If you can take your eyes away from the dreamy visage of Shervin Pishevar for a second, you'll notice that little black box on the right hand side touting content paid for by Fidelity without disclosing that it's actually an ad.

Forbes Now Including Advertiser-Created Content On Front Cover Of Magazine

If you thought the demon who goes by many names — native advertising, advertorials, sponsored stories, promoted content, utter bullsh*t — was something that was relegated to the Internet, then go check out the new issue of Forbes, which not only comes complete with some of this bought-and-paid-for crap, but which actually lists it on the front cover of the magazine like it’s just another story. [More]

Ad Execs Pick Their Favorite Fake ‘Saturday Night Live’ Ads From Last 40 Years

“After five or ten fish, it gets to be quite a rush,” is a slogan more ads should employ.

This weekend, NBC’s Saturday Night Live will celebrate turning 40, which is incredibly depressing for some of us who have fuzzy childhood memories of sneaking downstairs to watch Chevy Chase, Gilda Radner, John Belushi and others do things that we knew were hilarious even if we were too young to understand. So what better way to end the week than to look back at some of the best fake ads ever aired on SNL. [More]