(Buzzfeed)

Are the highlights in your hair sunkissed and subtle with complementary shading? Then maybe you can work for Abercrombie & Fitch. But those of you with “chunks of contrasting color” can go work at a store that doesn’t think plus-size consumers are the “not-so-cool kids.” [via Buzzfeed, which has many other details from the Abercrombie employee handbook]

Abercrombie CEO Mike Jeffries looks more like Gary Busey than one of his models.

Abercrombie CEO Sorry That People Didn’t Like When He Said Plus-Size People Don’t Belong In His Clothes

A couple weeks back, the Internet found more reasons to hate Abercrombie & Fitch after people resurrected a 2006 interview in which CEO Mike Jeffries said his company deliberately avoids selling to the “not-so-cool kids,” which was his way of referring to people who aren’t skinny. Now Jeffries is apologizing, not for what he said, but really just because people are upset about it. [More]

If Your Clothes Shrink After Washing, That's Not Hollister's Problem

If Your Clothes Shrink After Washing, That's Not Hollister's Problem

Roger would like the readers of Consumerist to know that clothing retailer Hollister, part of Abercrombie & Fitch, doesn’t stand behind its products at all. He writes that he ordered a pair of shorts online, which shrank significantly after the first time they went through the laundry. (Yes, he followed the care instructions.) The company refused to remedy the problem or issue Roger a refund, because the shorts weren’t returned in their original, untouched, tags-on condition. Wait, isn’t that the point? [More]

Abercrombie & Fitch CEO's Perks Include Money For Not Getting Perks

Abercrombie & Fitch CEO's Perks Include Money For Not Getting Perks

It makes sense to reward those who perform well at their jobs, and withhold perks from those who don’t — but it seems Abercrombie & Fitch is a little bit confused on that last point. The company, mired in its “aspirational” $90 prices for cargo pants and its ads featuring gamboling half-dressed models, netted only $254,000 last year. So what’d they do? Take away the CEOs exorbitant travel budget. And then pay him more money to not spend money. [More]

Muslim Hollister Employee Fired Because Of Headscarf

Muslim Hollister Employee Fired Because Of Headscarf

Update: This is the new discrimination incident that this post was about. Sorry for the link mixup. There are evidently a lot of things that violate the “look policy” of Abercrombie & Fitch and Hollister stores. For example, having a prosthetic arm. Or wearing an Islamic head scarf. According to the complaint a California woman filed with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, a Hollister store hired her, then fired after a visit from a district manager who found the scarf inappropriate work attire. [More]

Abercrombie & Fitch Fined For Discriminating Against Autistic Shopper

Abercrombie & Fitch Fined For Discriminating Against Autistic Shopper

The PR geniuses at Abercrombie & Fitch are in the news again for refusing to let a 14-year old autistic shopper have help trying on clothes. The Minnesota Department of Human Rights has fined the company $115,264 for discriminating against a person with a disability.

One-Armed Abercrombie & Fitch Worker Wins Wrongful Dismissal Case

One-Armed Abercrombie & Fitch Worker Wins Wrongful Dismissal Case

A former UK Abercrombie & Fitch employee whose prosthetic arm didn’t comport with the store’s “look policy” has won a case against the clothier for wrongful dismissal and emotional trauma.

Sorry, Your Prosthetic Arm Doesn't Fit With Abercrombie & Fitch's "Look Policy"

Sorry, Your Prosthetic Arm Doesn't Fit With Abercrombie & Fitch's "Look Policy"

UPDATE: One-Armed Abercrombie & Fitch Worker Wins Wrongful Dismissal Case

Virginia Beach Seizes "Obscene" Abercrombie Posters

Virginia Beach Seizes "Obscene" Abercrombie Posters

This weekend, Virginia Beach police commandeered giant photographs in a local Abercrombie & Fitch clothing store. City Code Section 22.31, makes it a crime to display “obscene materials in a business that is open to juveniles.” One of the pictures shows several bare-chested boys running through a field wearing jeans. The one in the font’s jeans are at half-mast, exposing a substantial portion of his dime slot. The store had been asked to take the photographs down several times before but didn’t comply. Is showing a kid’s butt crack in a larger-than-life-sized picture a bit strange? Yes. Obscene? We’re not sure, but Virginia Beach, the city that tried to ban public cursing, is.