Court Allows Utah To Ban Price-Fixing Of Contact Lenses

Court Allows Utah To Ban Price-Fixing Of Contact Lenses

Contact lens companies have been working together to create price floors for their products, prohibiting retailers from offering competitive discounts and removing consumers’ ability to shop around for savings. Legislators in Utah recently passed a bill that would outlaw this practice but in May a federal appeals court temporarily blocked it from being enacted. But on Friday, the court vacated that injunction, allowing the new law to move forward. [More]

1-800-Contacts Comes Through For Your Eyes In An Emergency

1-800-Contacts Comes Through For Your Eyes In An Emergency

1-800-Contacts is the rare company where an actual human picks up the phone when you call–no maze of phone menus. Peter tells Consumerist that he had a fantastic experience where a customer service rep went above and beyond in the service of the health of his eyes. [More]

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Above and Beyond: 1-800 CONTACTS Restores Vision, Faith in Customer Service

1-800 CONTACTS restored Kim’s vision, and her faith in customer service. Kim ordered four boxes of contacts, but received the wrong lenses, a fact she discovered when she tried them on and the world went fuzzy. “Way fuzzy. Like more more fuzzy than with no contacts at all.”

So I started comparing my old boxes to my new boxes and discovered that while the power of the lenses was correct, there was a plus sign (+) on the new boxes and a minus sign (-) on my old boxes. The order form had a plus on it so whoever fulfilled the order (probably a machine since the boxes are bar coded and we use a similar boxing system at my company) did their job properly. I came to the awful realization that I had filled the order form out wrong. It was all my fault and a fairly expensive $200 mistake.

Ouch. Kim made the mistake, so Kim should pay for new lenses, right?