(David Transier)

American Airlines Refused To Refund Ticket After Fourth-Grader’s Death

Following the death of their young daughter, an Illinois family couldn’t bear the thought of following through with a long-planned spring break trip, so they asked American Airlines to refund the ticket purchased in their daughter’s name. While airlines have varying policies regarding refunds and deaths, the family says they were shocked when the airline refused the refund. [More]

(Carbon Arc)

Father Of Teen Poisoned By Caffeine Powder Files Lawsuit Blaming His Death On Supplement Makers, Amazon

The father of an Ohio teen who died in 2014 after ingesting a powdered caffeine marketed as a dietary supplement has filed a lawsuit against Amazon.com and the product’s distributors, claiming that they failed to provide proper warnings about the dangers of using the substance. [More]

(World of Oddy)

Report: Injuries Related To Bounce Houses, Other Inflatable Attractions, On The Rise

Is it every kid’s dream to go flying through the air, light as a bird, only to land safely on a soft surface? Perhaps. But that doesn’t mean that all of those inflatable bounce houses, castles, slides and other amusements are necessarily safe for children, and a federal agency is pointing to a rise in injuries on such attractions to make sure parents are aware of the risks. [More]

FDA Warns: If Your “Low T” Is Just From Getting Older, Don’t Use Prescription Testosterone

FDA Warns: If Your “Low T” Is Just From Getting Older, Don’t Use Prescription Testosterone

In recent years, makers of prescription testosterone treatments like AndroGel began throwing around the term “Low T” in TV ads, blaming low levels of the hormone for various problems — sex drive, flagging energy, moodiness — that have long been associated with simply growing older. But the FDA is now acknowledging that these drugs pose “a possible increased risk of heart attack and stroke” and are warning against their use for the treatment of anything other than very specific medical conditions. [More]

Fab.com Brand Sold For Maybe $15 Million-ish, Spinoff Still Sells Furniture

Fab.com Brand Sold For Maybe $15 Million-ish, Spinoff Still Sells Furniture

You may remember Fab.com from when people were posting affiliate links from them to your Facebook feed almost constantly. The company was massively successful as part of the recession-era flash-sale boom, combining discounts with well-curated products. That model led the company to have hundreds of employees and a $1 billion valuation. Then that business collapsed. Now the Fab.com brand has been sold for…well, the companies involved aren’t disclosing how much the final sale price is. [More]

Takata To Double Airbag Replacement Production To 900,000 Kits By September

Takata To Double Airbag Replacement Production To 900,000 Kits By September

After facing increased scrutiny by federal regulators in recent weeks regarding an investigation into the massive airbag recall and lack of new safety devices, Japanese auto parts maker Takata announced it will double production of replacement airbags in the next six months. [More]

(Gail Dixon)

RECALL Act Would Require Consumers Fix Vehicle Safety Issues Before Registration Renewal

During 2014’s recallapoalooza federal regulators revealed that the average completion rate for a vehicle recall was just 75%. While some consumers might not be aware their car has a safety issue, others simply put off the needed repairs. A new bill introduced in the Senate Monday aims to make sure potentially dangerous vehicles aren’t on the road, by requiring fixes be completed before registration renewals are granted.  [More]

NHTSA Increases Intensity Of Takata Airbag Investigation, Orders Company To Preserve Safety Devices

NHTSA Increases Intensity Of Takata Airbag Investigation, Orders Company To Preserve Safety Devices

Federal regulators continue to put pressure on Takata Corporation to cooperate with a defective airbag investigation started last year. A week after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration began fining the company $14,000 per day for failing to turn over documents and answer questions, the agency upgraded the investigation and ordered the company to preserve evidence. [More]

Two senators called on the FDA to investigate allegations that Purina's Beneful brand dog food includes toxins.

Lawsuit Claims Thousands Of Dogs Became Ill Or Died After Eating Purina’s Beneful Kibble

A recently filed lawsuit claims that instead of containing nutrient-rich, high-quality ingredients, Nestle Purina PetCare Company’s most popular brand of dog food includes toxins that have led to serious illness or death for thousands of dogs. [More]

(Allan)

GM Ignition Switch Death Toll Increases To 57 Nearly A Month After Claims Deadline

Nearly a month after the deadline to file death and injury compensation claims related to General Motors’ ignition recall, the number of fatalities tied to the long-ignored defect continues to increase.

[More]

Death Toll From GM Ignition Defect Reaches 56

Death Toll From GM Ignition Defect Reaches 56

A year after General Motors first announced the long-delayed recall of the Chevy Cobalt, Saturn Ion and several other vehicles for an ignition problem that both the carmaker and regulators had ignored, the fund responsible for vetting death and injury claims related to the recall is now acknowledging at least 56 fatalities. [More]

Meet The New Marlboro Spokesman: Jeff, The Diseased Lung In A Cowboy Hat

Meet The New Marlboro Spokesman: Jeff, The Diseased Lung In A Cowboy Hat

On Sunday’s episode of Last Week Tonight, host John Oliver took an in-depth look at how the tobacco industry uses expensive lawsuits and byzantine international trade agreements to keep countries from pushing for stronger regulation on cigarettes. But rather than just call Big Tobacco out for its bad behavior, Oliver also offered a helpful solution that might make all sides happy. [More]

(gumby liberation organization)

New NHTSA Chief Wants To Create Team Focused On Spotting Defects

Just a month into his new gig as the head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Mark Rosekind unveiled his vision for the future of the agency, including increasing staff and creating two new divisions to help step up efforts to identify defects and alert motorists about issues and recalls. [More]

Facebook Adds Features To Let Users Control What Happens To Accounts After Death

Facebook Adds Features To Let Users Control What Happens To Accounts After Death

In a reversal from its past stance that all it would do is freeze a user’s account upon death and “memorialize it,” Facebook says it will now allow users to designate a “legacy contact” to have some control over their pages, or otherwise designate what they’d like to happen to their accounts after they’ve passed. Or, you can tell Facebook just to shut the account down for good. [More]

The Jan. 2012 crash of the Costa Concordia took the lives of 32 people. Today, the ship's captain was found guilty of multiple counts of manslaughter.

Costa Concordia Cruise Ship Captain Guilty Of Manslaughter

More than three years after Carnival’s Costa Concordia cruise ship crashed near the Tuscan island of Giglio, ultimately resulting in the deaths of 32 people, the captain of that ship has been found guilty of manslaughter by an Italian court. [More]

(Adam Ondi)

Family Of Two Toddlers Crushed By Fallen Dresser Sues Babies R Us Store, Furniture Maker

The family of two toddler sisters who died after a dresser fell on them is now suing the Babies R Us store where the dresser was purchased in Pennsylvania, as well as a New Jersey furniture maker. [More]

Red Bull Tries To Block Brewer From Trademarking “Old Ox” Because They Are Both Bovines

We know it's hard to tell the two apart, but the one on the left is probably for Red Bull... we think.

Whether it’s the pizzeria logo that resembles the Garden State Parkway sign, two beers battling over the use of the same three letters, or a bunch of marijuana edibles with humorous takes on famous chocolate brands, even the silliest trademark disputes are usually based in the argument that maybe someone out there might possibly confuse the products. But the folks at Red Bull have a problem with a Virginia brewer who wants to trademark the name “Old Ox” simply because the two brands are bovine in nature. [More]

FCC Not Scared Of AT&T’s Plan To Sue Over New Neutrality Rules

FCC Not Scared Of AT&T’s Plan To Sue Over New Neutrality Rules

Earlier this week, FCC Chair Tom Wheeler confirmed his intention to ask his fellow commissioners to reclassify broadband as a telecommunications service, which would give the FCC more authority to regulate it and prohibit anti-consumer practices like throttling and blocking of data. AT&T is already gearing up for a suit to stop this change, but the FCC is apparently not terribly worried. [More]