(Brad Clinesmith)

Class-Action Lawsuit Claims 10 Automakers Hid Keyless Ignition Carbon Monoxide Dangers That Led To 13 Deaths

At least 13 people have died because 10 major automakers concealed the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning in more than five million vehicles equipped with keyless ignitions, a new class-action lawsuit claims. [More]

CarMax Plays “Used Car Recall Roulette” By Selling Potentially Dangerous Vehicles

CarMax Plays “Used Car Recall Roulette” By Selling Potentially Dangerous Vehicles

During the height of recallopalooza 2014, a coalition of consumer advocacy groups raised concerns about CarMax, alleging that the nation’s largest used vehicle seller was misleading customers with claims of “Quality Certified” cars and “125+ point” inspections while not revealing that some cars had been recalled for safety issues that had not yet been repaired.  More than a year later, a new report shows that CarMax is continuing this practice, which one legislator has dubbed “used car recall roulette.” [More]

Why The Stolen Ashley Madison Data Is (Legally) Fair Game For The Internet

Why The Stolen Ashley Madison Data Is (Legally) Fair Game For The Internet


If your credit card information gets stolen in a data breach, there are certain rules in place that limit your liability and protect you from fraud. But if a hack makes personal, potentially very embarrassing, information public — as in, say, the Ashley Madison hack — there’s not much anyone can do to stop others from seeing or writing about it. [More]

9-Out-Of-10 GM Ignition Switch Compensation Claims Denied

9-Out-Of-10 GM Ignition Switch Compensation Claims Denied

The fund set up by General Motors to compensate victims of the carmaker’s long-ignored ignition switch defect ultimately acknowledged that GM was responsible for 124 deaths and 257 injuries, but these confirmed instances only represent a small portion of the thousands of claims rejected by the fund. [More]

Tests Find Drug-Resistant Bacteria In 18% Of Conventionally Raised Ground Beef

(jpmarth)

Bacteria is everywhere, so it’s no surprise that you’ll find at least some ugly little pathogens in any meat products you buy. Most of these bugs won’t survive the cooking process, especially if you get that meat up to 160 degrees before serving. But since so many people like their burgers on the rarer side, it’s smart to know the potential risks. [More]

Consumer Reports

How Safe Is Your Ground Beef?

This story was first published by our sister publication Consumer Reports. [More]

NHTSA Denies Second Petition To Open Investigation Into Unintended Acceleration Of Toyota Vehicles

NHTSA Denies Second Petition To Open Investigation Into Unintended Acceleration Of Toyota Vehicles

For the second time this year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced it would not open a probe into millions of Toyota vehicles regarding possible unintended acceleration. [More]

Toyota Reportedly Set To Buy 13 Million Airbag Inflators From Takata’s Rival

Toyota Reportedly Set To Buy 13 Million Airbag Inflators From Takata’s Rival

Automakers have struggled in recent months to get their hands on enough new parts to replace millions of defective Takata airbags. To make matters worse, the Japanese auto parts maker at the center of the massive safety issue has re-recalled hundreds of thousands of replacement parts in recent months because the devices could still harm drivers and their passengers upon deployment. To reduce these risks, Toyota is reportedly looking to purchase millions of new airbag inflators from a rival of Takata.  [More]

Senators Call For Recall Of All Vehicles With Takata Airbags

Senators Call For Recall Of All Vehicles With Takata Airbags

Because it could take some time for federal investigators to determine the cause of a ruptured Takata airbag in a Volkswagen — a carmaker that hadn’t been part of any earlier exploding, shrapnel-shooting airbag recalls — some lawmakers are calling for a recall of all vehicles equipped with airbags made by Takata. [More]

Why Don’t Huge Privacy Flaws Result In Recalled Smartphones?

吉姆 Jim Hofman

When a car has a major flaw, like a potentially lethal airbag, it gets recalled. Same for a coffeemaker, or a surfboard, or a prescription drug. But when that major flaw is in a product’s software — like a huge exploit that puts literally a billion consumers’ privacy and personal data at risk — there’s no universal process out there for remedying the situation. Do we need one? And if so, how can we get one? [More]

(frankieleon)

Patients At NYC Hospitals Will No Longer Become Accidental Reality TV Stars

We don’t know about you, but the last thing we want when we go to the hospital is for anyone — not even our loved ones — to shoot video of us. We certainly wouldn’t want to find out that we’re being filmed without our permission by a crew for some cruddy reality TV show. And after one such show actually broadcast the secretly recorded death of a patient in a New York City hospital, it looks like patients in NYC may not have to worry about being caught on camera at your worst. [More]

Bumble Bee Foods Will Pay $6M For Worker Who Was Killed In Pressure Cooker

Bumble Bee Foods Will Pay $6M For Worker Who Was Killed In Pressure Cooker

Almost three years after a Bumble Bee Foods worker was killed when he was accidentally locked inside a pressure cooker he was repairing, his employer will have to pay $6 million for “willfully violating worker safety rules” as part of a settlement agreement announced by the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s office. [More]

Senate Report Rips Airlines For Failing To Clearly Disclose Fees

Senate Report Rips Airlines For Failing To Clearly Disclose Fees

Barring a law outlawing them — or severely limiting them — fees for everything from checked bags, to food, to in-flight entertainment, to preferred seating, to early boarding (and possibly early deplaning) are hear to stay. But a new report from staffers on the Senate Commerce Committee claims that airlines may be going too far in trying to hide some of these add-on costs. [More]

Jeep Cherokee Owners File Lawsuit Against Fiat Chrysler, Harman After Hackers Wirelessly Hijack Vehicle

Jeep Cherokee Owners File Lawsuit Against Fiat Chrysler, Harman After Hackers Wirelessly Hijack Vehicle

It was inevitable: A few weeks after hackers showed that a Jeep Cherokee could be hijacked remotely, three car owners have filed a lawsuit seeking class-action status against Fiat Chrylser Automobiles and Harman International, the maker of the Uconnect onboard infotainment system. [More]

At Least 124 People Died Because Of General Motors Ignition Defect

At Least 124 People Died Because Of General Motors Ignition Defect

One year after General Motors’ victim compensation fund began accepting death and injury claims related to its massive ignition switch issue and six months after the submission deadline, the carmaker announced it had completed its review. Now, instead of acknowledging just 13 deaths tied to the deadly defect, the car manufacture is admitting that 124 deaths – nearly 10 times the original tally – resulted from its failure to address the problematic switches in more than 2.59 millions of vehicles. [More]

United, American Airlines Also Announce Bans On Shipping Exotic Animal Trophies

United, American Airlines Also Announce Bans On Shipping Exotic Animal Trophies

Following Delta Air Lines’ announcement yesterday that it wouldn’t allow lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros and buffalo trophies as freight on its planes, both United Airlines and American Airlines have joined in to say they’re also banning big game trophies. [More]

July Recall Roundup: Of Course Kids Are Going To Chew On Their Strollers

July Recall Roundup: Of Course Kids Are Going To Chew On Their Strollers

In this month’s recall roundup, a stroller wasn’t designed to be chewed on, a fish tank heater might cook your fish instead of keeping them comfortable, and a lawn mower may fling grass clippings at the person operating the vehicle. It’s a dangerous world out there, apparently. [More]

Fiat Chrysler Loses Bid For New Trial In Wrongful Death Case Involving Jeep Fire

Fiat Chrysler Loses Bid For New Trial In Wrongful Death Case Involving Jeep Fire

Fiat Chrysler’s woes related to millions of Jeeps that could catch fire after being rear-ended continued today as a judge rejected the company’s request for a new a trial in the wrongful death case of a four-year-old boy. [More]