Have You Quit Mint.com?

Have You Quit Mint.com?

Mint.com started as a darling of free online personal finance management tools but the love affair has soured for some users since the site was acquired by Intuit back in 2009. At first it was complaints about the ads for Quicken and other Intuit products and some of the fun language and tone getting lost. But in late 2010 Mint switched their backend system from Yodlee to Quicken’s in-house one, leading a number of customers’ accounts screwed up and prompting some to abandon Mint entirely. [More]

Mint Makes Saving More Fun With New "Goals" Dashboard

Mint Makes Saving More Fun With New "Goals" Dashboard

Mint was the cool kid on the financial website block until it cut its hair and went corporate, but the Intuit-owned service can still roll out some nifty features now and then. The latest is a “goals” dashboard, which takes advantage of our natural tendency to try harder if there’s some way to see immediate feedback. Under your account there’s now a goals tab, where you can activate any of the default choices (“get out of debt,” “take a trip,” “buy a home”) or create your own (“laser hair removal,” “pvc bodysuit”). Then you can link your accounts to that goal, and have a quick visual metric you can use to stay focused. [More]

Perfume Packaging Defeats Pen, Can Opener And Knives

Perfume Packaging Defeats Pen, Can Opener And Knives

Film critic Jen Johans can tear movies apart, but even her sharpest barbs were no match for impenetrable DKNY perfume packaging. [More]

Mint Upselling To "Free"CreditReport.com

Mint Upselling To "Free"CreditReport.com

It didn’t take long for Intuit to start ruining a great product. They’ve begun upselling Mint.com customers to two “free” credit report sites that are anything but. UPDATE: Turns out Mint was already doing this pre-Intuit. Bully for them.

Quicken Online To Be Shut Down Next Year, Accounts Merged With Mint

Quicken Online To Be Shut Down Next Year, Accounts Merged With Mint

When news broke back in September that Intuit, the company behind Quicken, was buying personal finance website Mint, everyone wondered how the two services would co-exist. The worst case scenario was that Mint would be absorbed somehow into Intuit’s in-house competitor, Quicken Online. Thankfully, it looks like the opposite will happen.

What's The Over/Under On Mint Starting To Suck Now That Intuit Bought Them?

What's The Over/Under On Mint Starting To Suck Now That Intuit Bought Them?

I blanched when I saw the subject line, “Mint.com to be acquired by Intuit, maker of Quicken.” More like “Mint.com to be acquired by Intuit, makers of crap,” I thought. Judging by your comments, I don’t blanch alone.

Intuit Will Buy Mint.com For $170 Million

Intuit Will Buy Mint.com For $170 Million

No longer wishing to compete with Mint.com, Quicken-maker Intuit has decided to buy it. The AP says that the company plans to keep its current offering, Quicken Online, but that it will be aimed at customers who also use its Quicken desktop software. Mint.com will become the company’s primary personal finance website.

What's The Best Personal Finance Software?

What's The Best Personal Finance Software?

Slate tested a slew of personal-finance tools recently, and Mint and Quicken Online were the top two winners, with Mint only a point behind. Besides the advertising disguised as “ways to save,” one area where Mint lost points was not being able to create custom categories. Three days later, Mint announced that they were enabling custom categories. So, in a do-over, Mint would probably win. Plus it’s free. UPDATE: Quicken Online just launched a basic tier of service for free. The dance continues!