AT&T, Verizon Responses To Campaign To End Robocalls Unsurprisingly Empty And Noncommittal

AT&T, Verizon Responses To Campaign To End Robocalls Unsurprisingly Empty And Noncommittal

If there’s one thing consumers can agree on… well, it’s probably that they don’t like Comcast. But if there are two things that consumers can agree on, it’s that and also that robocalls suck. The tech to block robocalls is out there, but phone companies don’t use it. And their excuses for not doing so aren’t getting any better. [More]

Taco Bell’s Founder Originally Intended To Start A Burger Empire

Taco Bell’s Founder Originally Intended To Start A Burger Empire

If you drive to Downey, CA, you can find the oldest existing McDonald’s eatery and the currently vacant building that housed the first Taco Bell. And the tie between the two famous fast food names goes deeper than that. It was in the parking lot of the very first McDonald’s that the man who would eventually create the Taco Bell empire dreamt of a fast food empire stretching from coast to coast. [More]

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter has been a vocal supporter of Comcast and of its efforts to acquire Time Warner Cable, in spite of the company's low customer satisfaction scores and high prices in its home city.

Philadelphia Finally Releases Results Of Comcast Customer Service Survey; It’s Not Pretty

Earlier this week we told you how the city leadership here in Comcast’s hometown of Philadelphia appeared to be dragging their feet in getting around to releasing the results of 15-month-old survey of city residents about Comcast service, even though the cable company had already been shown the report. Today, the city finally got around to sharing this info with the public and it’s about as unpleasant as you’d expect. [More]

(Jeremy P)

Credit Card Issuers Increase Limits For Subprime Borrowers; Raise Concerns About Risks

As the economy continues to improve, credit card issuers have begun to loosen their vice grip on lending standards in order to raise borrowing limits for consumers. But the move to provide extend credit to those with blemished histories has raised concerns with consumer groups. [More]

In Atlanta? You Can Soon Sign Up For Internet Twice As Fast As Google Fiber. The Downside: It’s From Comcast

In Atlanta? You Can Soon Sign Up For Internet Twice As Fast As Google Fiber. The Downside: It’s From Comcast

Atlanta residents are now well-poised to join inhabitants of metro Raleigh and Kansas City as citizens of one of the nation’s few crucibles of fiber competition. Comcast is setting its sights squarely on Google Fiber today with the announcement of a new fiber to the home offering at twice Google’s speed, and Atlanta is the lucky city getting first dibs. [More]

(Brian Brodeur)

Airline’s Pilots Warn Passengers Of Safety Concerns

In an open letter to their passengers, the pilots of Nevada-based budget carrier Allegiant Air have gone public with their concerns about what they see as sagging service and safety standards for the airlines. [More]

Ticketmaster Says It Stands For “True Fan-Friendly Competition”

Ticketmaster Says It Stands For “True Fan-Friendly Competition”

Over the weekend, StubHub filed a lawsuit against Ticketmaster and the NBA’s Golden State Warriors, alleging that the team and the ticket company are forcing Warriors season-ticket subscribers to use Ticketmaster if they want to resell their seats to anyone. Ticketmaster is now defending itself and says that it is the one that’s on the side of sports fans. [More]

(bluwmongoose)

FTC’s Auto Industry Crackdown Includes Deceptive Advertising, Fraudulent Add-Ons & Improper Loan Modifications

A two-country crackdown on auto dealers’ deceptive, fraudulent practices culminated in six enforcement actions brought by the Federal Trade Commission resulting in more than $2.6 million in judgements and consumer refunds. [More]

Whatever Happened To GeoCities, Lycos, Netscape & Other Giants Of Web 1.0?

(Ben)

Long before Facebook and Twitter, well before even Friendster and MySpace, before the first dotcom bubble burst, in the eons before Google was a glint in anyone’s eye, there was the first web. In comparison to everything that’s come after it, you could call it Web 1.0 or perhaps even just “the dark ages.” But for anyone born before, say, 1990, this was the dawn of our now-ubiquitous digital world. But as the digital giants of yesteryear have been replaced by the now-ubiquitous Facebook and Google, how many are still in play now? [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Panera Bread Wants To Tape Its Employees While They Make Your Food

Over the years video footage of fast food kitchens has surfaced showing employees doing some not-so-pleasant things. But Panera Bread is hoping its own foray into behind-the-scenes footage translates into more accurately prepared meals. [More]

(Taro the Shiba Inu)

Sony Unveils Pricing For PlayStation Vue Streaming Service, Confirming It’s Not Very Cheap

For months now Sony has left the pricing details of its PlayStation Vue streaming television service up to our wandering imaginations. Now the company has all but confirmed previous reports that the service would cost a pretty penny, while announcing its availability in certain areas of the country starting today. [More]

(Images Money)

American Express Partners With Macy’s, Exxon Mobil & Others For Coalition Loyalty Program

Forget about Costco, American Express seems to have moved on from being dumped by the warehouse club, announcing its partnership with a plethora of retailers and companies for a new venture: a coalition loyalty program. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Big Data Is Here To Stay. So Can We Use It To Make Recalls Actually Work?

Sometimes products are unsafe. From bacteria-filled food to shrapnel-shooting airbags, on occasion even the most conscientious company will find itself needing to recall a product if it turns out to be harmful to consumers. But recalls are a big pain in the butt all around. One of the biggest issues? Actually letting consumers know that the stuff in their hands or on their shelves has, in fact, actually been recalled. [More]

(André-Pierre du Plessis)

Fraud Victim’s Impossible Choice: Eat $1,500 In Charges Or Be Banned From PayPal Forever

When a customer’s chargeback scheme left one PayPal customer down $1,500 and without the pricey headphones that they had sold, the person who sold the headphones was understandably upset. It’s wrong to rip anyone off, but they’re an individual seller rather than a faceless corporation. PayPal reduced the amount that this person owed to $700, but that was still $700 more than they really owed anyone. What’s a consumer to do? In this case, post to Reddit. [More]

Her friend posted this letter, said to be written by a USPS worker. (Facebook)

USPS Apologizes To Deaf Woman After She Says Worker Refused To Communicate With Her By Writing

The United States Postal Service is apologizing to a deaf woman in Florida after she said workers at her local post office refused to accommodate her by providing service through writing, instead allegedly mocking her and making her feel humiliated. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Report: Stolen Credit Card Information Used By Fraudsters To Make Purchases With Apple Pay

A rash in data breaches at national retailers may have led fraudsters to use Apple Pay to make big-ticket purchases with credit card information stolen during national data breaches. [More]

Comcast Not Afraid Of Streaming Services; Won’t Commit To Playing Nice With Them

Comcast Not Afraid Of Streaming Services; Won’t Commit To Playing Nice With Them

Earlier this week, a Dish executive claimed that Comcast was afraid of so-called over-the-top streaming services like Dish’s Sling TV and that the cable giant could use its size and influence to prevent broadcasters from signing onto Sling and others. Now Comcast is saying it has nothing to fear from these new services, but won’t commit to avoiding deals that make it difficult for them to compete. [More]

(Misfit Photographer)

New Visa Feature Uses Smartphone Location Tracker To Prevent Fraud By Knowing Where You Are At All Times

Forgetting to tell your bank that you’ll be traveling far outside of your normal spending zone can often lead to frustrations like having transactions rejected out of concern that your card is being used fraudulently. In an attempt to make the lives of frequent travelers easier – and prevent fraud – Visa plans to launch a new service this spring that automatically informs banks where you are. [More]