(Flint Creek Wildlife Rehabilitation)

Man Doesn’t Notice Coyote Lodged In Front Grill Of Car

When a train conductor in Wisconsin pulled in to work last week in his car, he had an unexpected decoration on his grill. A coyote was somehow wedged in, and it was alive but injured. The local animal control officer took Vern, as he was named, to a wildlife rehabilitator, and he is expected to recover. Only how did he get wedged in the front of a car to begin with? [More]

(John Abella)

California Governor Vetoes Weak-Kneed Antibiotics Bill

Considering that 80% of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. are used on farm animals, and that most of those drugs are used primarily for growth promotion, you’d think we’d be happy to see a state like California introduce legislation that appears to ban the use of antibiotics to get fatter cows, pigs, and chickens. But it’s what that bill doesn’t do that has us concerned, and why California Governor Jerry Brown has vetoed it. [More]

(frankieleon)

Media Companies Afraid To Show FCC Their Comcast Contracts Because Rivals Might Learn Their Secrets

It’s no secret that media companies are pretty worried about the repercussions of letting Comcast and Time Warner Cable merge. But what is a big secret are the agreements that those companies have with Comcast and TWC right now. They’re so secret, in fact, that networks are refusing to share any data with the FCC because they’re afraid their rivals might benefit from it. And that’s a problem, because without that data, the FCC is missing one of the key tools it should have in its toolbox as it evaluates the merger. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

AT&T, Where “Congestion” & Data Caps Only Apply To Existing Users

Ever since AT&T and Verizon got rid of unlimited wireless plans, both companies have used the questionable excuse of “congestion,” claiming that throttling data after remaining unlimited users pass an arbitrary threshold was necessary to keep data flowing. But in plans announced over the weekend, AT&T is effectively once again offering unlimited data (for a limited time) to new customers, which makes one wonder — what happened to all that congestion? [More]

PODS Awarded $62M In Trademark Infringement Suit Against U-Haul

PODS Awarded $62M In Trademark Infringement Suit Against U-Haul

What’s in a name? Well, if that name happens to be PODS about $62 million. That’s how much the storage and moving company was awarded in damages from a trademark infringement lawsuit against U-Haul. [More]

Comcast Promises This Guy Is Coming To Fix Your Cable

"Meine dispatcher says there is something wrong with deine kable?"

Comcast has an image problem… mostly because its customer service is consistently ranked among the worst — not just of cable companies, but of all customer-facing businesses in the U.S. So maybe that’s not so much an image problem as it is a systemic rot that has been allowed to fester because the company has virtually no competition. So how to deal with this problem? Promote someone and claim that he’s going the answer to all your problems. [More]

(frankieleon)

USPS Wants To Leave Groceries, Other Stuff On Your Doorstep At 4 A.M.

Earlier this month it was announced that the U.S. Postal Service was testing out how badly it could screw up the delivery of Amazon Fresh grocery shipments in the San Francisco area. But a recent regulatory filing shows that USPS has hopes of bringing its laid-back, carefree delivery approach to groceries and other items all around the country. [More]

You Are Now Watching 93 Minutes Of Netflix A Day, You Lazy Bum

You Are Now Watching 93 Minutes Of Netflix A Day, You Lazy Bum

Cable companies hate Netflix. They pretend it’s because the streaming video service puts up a fuss about having to pay a toll just to be carried that last mile of the Internet to customers’ homes. But really, as new data shows, it’s because people are now spending an awful lot of time watching Netflix instead of watching TV. [More]

DirecTV Shareholders Sign Off On AT&T Merger

DirecTV Shareholders Sign Off On AT&T Merger

While the rest of the world waits for regulators in D.C. to decide if AT&T and DirecTV should be allowed to live together in wedded bliss, one group of people has already given their blessing to the deal. [More]

AT&T and Verizon: Data Caps On Home Internet Service Are Great For Everyone (Especially Us)

AT&T and Verizon: Data Caps On Home Internet Service Are Great For Everyone (Especially Us)

Verizon and AT&T are big players (and getting bigger) in broadband landline service, but they seem to take a mobile phone mindset with them everywhere they go. Not only do they think that home broadband doesn’t need to be faster than your phone, but also now they’re saying that data caps on your home internet use are perfectly reasonable, too. [More]

(<a href="Neff Conner">Neff Conner)

Airport Parking Company Really Sorry About Tasteless E-mail Mocking Parking Lot Death

Earlier this month, a man in his fifties from the suburbs of Chicago was reported missing, then found dead in a parking lot at O’Hare International Airport. An autopsy was inconclusive, but authorities found no evidence that there was any foul play. AirportParkingReservations.com knows why he died, though. He died because finding a parking space at the airport totally sucks. [More]

Comcast Keeps Claiming Competition Abounds, Despite Mountains Of Evidence From Planet Reality

Comcast Keeps Claiming Competition Abounds, Despite Mountains Of Evidence From Planet Reality

In August, as part of the merger oversight process, the FCC asked Comcast and Time Warner Cable for more information about their operations and their plans. In answer, Comcast has submitted 735 pages of documentation. That’s a lot of information, but Comcast’s responses have one key theme: the Comcast/TWC merger will not harm competition, because broadband competition is plentiful… no matter what the rest of us, including the FCC, seem to think. [More]

Netflix Customers Waiting A Very Long Time For Baffling Array Of DVDs

Netflix Customers Waiting A Very Long Time For Baffling Array Of DVDs

Our readers have confirmed: they are, indeed, waiting for-freaking-ever to get some discs from Netflix. These include classic films, animated movies, television series, and new DVD releases. Is there some kind of nationwide DVD shortage, or is Netflix trying to strangle its DVD business? [More]

Netflix CEO Asks: Why Aren’t Cable Companies Paying Us?

Netflix CEO Asks: Why Aren’t Cable Companies Paying Us?

For years, as cable companies and other Internet Service Providers have tried to round up support for their desire to charge a toll to bandwidth-heavy content providers like Netflix, they have repeatedly said that they deserve to be paid for carrying all that data to subscribers… even though they are already being paid by their own customers, and even though they are only carrying that content for a small fraction of its journey. Now the CEO of Netflix wants to know why that argument doesn’t swing both ways? [More]

Newspapers Want To Charge Subscribers Extra To Receive Black Friday Ads

Newspapers Want To Charge Subscribers Extra To Receive Black Friday Ads

If your household still receives a daily or Sunday newspaper, take pity on your neighborhood’s paper carrier. It’s hard work to haul the ad-stuffed Thanksgiving editions of the paper to subscribers’ doorsteps. Still, that probably isn’t what papers like the Chicago Tribune and Detroit Free Press had in mind when they announced that they’ll be charging subscribers an extra dollar or two for the privilege of receiving a bunch of ads. [More]

FTC: No, You Probably Can’t Lose 20 Pounds By Using An Ab Glider For Three Minutes A Day

FTC: No, You Probably Can’t Lose 20 Pounds By Using An Ab Glider For Three Minutes A Day

No matter how old a Federal Trade Commission consent order is, if you break it you’re bound to pay a pretty stiff penalty. Just ask the folks over at ICON Health & Fitness Inc. who agreed to pay millions of dollars in penalties for continuing to make deceptive weight loss claims in fitness equipment advertisements. [More]

White House Acknowledges Over-Use Of Antibiotics In Farm Animals, Shrugs

(Patrick Dockens)

Last year, the FDA released voluntary guidance for the pharmaceutical industry, which sells 80% of all antibiotics in the U.S. to farmers, primarily because they promote growth in animals. That guidance asked drug companies to please stop selling antibiotics for that purpose, but allows them to keep selling just as many drugs for “disease prevention,” even though it’s been proven that continuous, low-dose use of antibiotics renders their medical use less effective and contributes to the development of drug-resistant pathogens. Today, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology issued a report that some had hoped would recommend the FDA take a harder line on this issue. Those people are probably a bit disappointed. [More]

Still Want Marty McFly’s Back To The Future II Sneakers? You’re In Luck

Still Want Marty McFly’s Back To The Future II Sneakers? You’re In Luck

If you have an insatiable desire to dress up how people imagined future fashions would look in the not-so-distant past, then we have some good news for you. Someone is selling replicas of Marty McFly’s velcro high tops from 2015 (as envisioned in 1989), complete with built-in lights and velcro, but sadly sans hoverboard. [More]