(kreezzalee)

White House Acknowledges Health Risk Of Antibiotics Overuse; Critics Say It Fails To Fully Address Problem

In a new White House report on antibiotic resistance, the Obama administration acknowledges the serious public health risk posed by the over-prescription and overuse of antibiotics, and details multi-agency plans to combat the problem. However, many critics of the report say that these plans fail to close a loophole that will allow farmers to continue using medically unnecessary antibiotics on farm animals (who consume 80% of all antibiotics sold in the U.S.) primarily for the purpose of growth promotion. [More]

Restaurant Uses Surveillance Footage To Disprove 1-Star Yelp Review

Restaurant Uses Surveillance Footage To Disprove 1-Star Yelp Review

Being unable to get a seat at a busy restaurant where you don’t have a reservation is probably not a justifiable reason to give the place a one-star writeup on Yelp. But if you are going to put that negative stamp on a restaurant, at least tell the truth. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Frontier Airlines Strands Passengers At The Gate For 18 Hours

Passengers awaiting a flight from St. Louis to Denver over the weekend could have driven to their destination in less time than it took for their Frontier Airlines flight to actually board. [More]

(BAMCAT)

Petition Wants To Make Ohio The Fifth State To Legalize Marijuana

A group in Ohio wants the state to join Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska in the legal recreational marijuana club, with a new petition to amend the state’s constitution. [More]

(Sean Winters)

Watch Out For Fake Magazine Renewal Invoices

When you subscribe to a magazine and a subscription renewal form arrives in the mail, you pay the invoice and keep the magazines coming, right? No, not quite: at least, not if your address and subscription information have fallen into the hands of a company called Subscription Billing Service, which customers say collects money without bothering to mention that they have no relationship to the magazine publisher. [More]

News Sites Consider Moving Their Content Inside Facebook (Because That Worked So Well In The AOL Era)

News Sites Consider Moving Their Content Inside Facebook (Because That Worked So Well In The AOL Era)

There’s news in the world of news today, as some major sites are on the cusp of a new publishing deal with Facebook. The deal would actively keep their content inside of Facebook, rather than having links on everyone’s love-to-hate-it social network lead back out to other companies’ respective websites. But there is one specific lesson this deal highlights: even on the internet, you can’t escape the cycles of history. Somehow, everything old will be new again. [More]

(FOX 2 News)

Southwest Airlines Kicks Passenger Off Flight For “Broad F****ing City” T-Shirt

For those unfamiliar with the Comedy Central show Broad City, the two main characters are a pair of unapologetically potty-mouthed friends with a penchant for using colorful language to describe any and all situations. But in showing his fandom with a T-shirt bearing the word “F***ing” between “Broad” and “City,” a Southwest Airlines passenger was reportedly kicked off his flight after refusing to cover up during an unscheduled stopover. [More]

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

Google To Start Doing Its Mega-Personalized Ad-Serving Thing On TV, Too

As dominant as it is and has been for decades, TV advertising is something of a crapshoot. Neilsen ratings are still the gold standard for every network out there, especially since they now finally track time-shifted viewing. But Neilsen still uses their own proprietary tech, and works on a sampling basis. In an age when every set-top box and most of the TVs they’re plugged into are themselves net-connected computers, there’s a more granular and accurate way to measure viewers and to advertise to them — and Google’s taking it. [More]

(Flyinace2000)

How To Make Pizza At Home That Won’t Be Horrible

You’ve got all your favorite toppings assembled, the cheese is waiting to be melted and the dough is ready to go. But no matter what you do, making pizza at home can be disappointing when compared to the pies served up at restaurants. It seems so simple — so why do homemade efforts often fall so short of expectations? [More]

How McDonald’s Markets To Kids Through Moms & Teachers

How McDonald’s Markets To Kids Through Moms & Teachers

McDonald’s has long been a target of critics of toy-filled Happy Meals who believe that these menu offerings are used to entice kids to eat fast food. The same goes with people who call for the retirement of Ronald McDonald (though one could argue that having a terrifying perma-grin clown as the face of your company isn’t exactly kid-friendly). But McDonald’s kid-targeted marketing doesn’t rely on Happy Meals; it extends into their schools and maybe even to their homes. [More]

(Effie.Y.)

The Numbers Show Startups Can’t Get Enough Of Calling Themselves The “Uber” For This, The “Airbnb” Of That

If you’ve been hearing startup companies throw around phrases like, “We’re the Uber of [insert industry that is not ride-hailing]!” or “Our service functions just like the Airbnb of [another industry that is not renting out rooms to strangers]!” you’re not alone. A recent analysis of language used by startups to describe their businesses show that a lot of them are hitching their apple carts to those brands’ rising stars. [More]

Report: New Streaming TV Services Trying To Sidestep Net Neutrality Rule

Report: New Streaming TV Services Trying To Sidestep Net Neutrality Rule

A segment of consumers has for many years been begging for an unbundled, à la carte option for programming. That future is now taking its first shambling steps into our homes — only, it’s happening through the magic of the internet, and not in pay-TV subscriptions. But right now, we are in a particularly turbulent time for sorting out the rules of what is and isn’t allowed when it comes to giving preferential treatment to certain services. While the virtual ink is still drying on the brand-new, not-yet-implemented open internet rule, new players in the field of over-the-top internet TV are already trying to see just how far that rule bends. [More]

Whatever Happened To GeoCities, Lycos, Netscape & Other Giants Of Web 1.0?

(Ben)

Long before Facebook and Twitter, well before even Friendster and MySpace, before the first dotcom bubble burst, in the eons before Google was a glint in anyone’s eye, there was the first web. In comparison to everything that’s come after it, you could call it Web 1.0 or perhaps even just “the dark ages.” But for anyone born before, say, 1990, this was the dawn of our now-ubiquitous digital world. But as the digital giants of yesteryear have been replaced by the now-ubiquitous Facebook and Google, how many are still in play now? [More]

(Chris Sobczak)

Amsterdam Uber Driver: Mysterious Masked Men Threatened Me

From the point of view of Uber, a service that summons cars and drivers over the Internet, maybe the fines imposed on the company by governments are a relatively cheap marketing expense instead of a nuisance. Yesterday, we shared that Germany has banned the company yet again. Authorities in the Netherlands have imposed a fine of $107,000 on the company for violating the laws that regulate taxis. [More]

Cheesesteak Pizza Briefly Available At Papa John’s Again

Last year, chain pizzeria Papa John’s introduced a cheesesteak-themed pizza for some reason. If you missed the cheesesteak pizza party at the end of 2014 and this seems like a good idea to you, Papa John’s is offering the pizza again until April 26. You can get a large pizza for for $12. A review in the blog Brand Eating described the pizza as “good but not great.” [Brand Eating]

Why Is LEGO Offering Beauty Tips To Little Girls?

Why Is LEGO Offering Beauty Tips To Little Girls?

Two years ago, a LEGO Friends salon playset took one of the top dishonors in the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood’s annual “worst products” list. The organization called the set “so jam-packed with condescending stereotypes it would even make Barbie blush.” That spirit lives on in a LEGO Friends magazine spread that made parents angry and–if we’re to believe company representatives–is making LEGO rethink their marketing of the Friends sets. Sort of. [More]

(me and the sysop)

Big Data Is Here To Stay. So Can We Use It To Make Recalls Actually Work?

Sometimes products are unsafe. From bacteria-filled food to shrapnel-shooting airbags, on occasion even the most conscientious company will find itself needing to recall a product if it turns out to be harmful to consumers. But recalls are a big pain in the butt all around. One of the biggest issues? Actually letting consumers know that the stuff in their hands or on their shelves has, in fact, actually been recalled. [More]

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

This Talking Barbie Doll Can Listen To You… And Share What You Say With Third Parties

Since some imaginative cave child made the first doll out of a dead marmot, kids have been talking to their make-believe pals. And for more than a century, some of these dolls have been talking back. But the newest generation of Mattel Barbie dolls may take things to the next level by not only listening to what you have to say, but by sharing your conversations with complete strangers. [More]