Dish Customers Get Cartoon Network, CNN Back After Month-Long Blackout

Dish Customers Get Cartoon Network, CNN Back After Month-Long Blackout

Just hours after averting (for now) a blackout of CBS-owned stations in 14 markets, Dish Network has made nice with another of its foes in the broadcasting world, ending the month-long blackout of Turner channels like CNN, HLN, and the Cartoon Network. [More]

Dish customers in 14 markets will only be able to see the 326 Big Bang Theory reruns that air every night in syndication if no deal is reached with CBS.

CBS Blackout Still Looms For Dish Customers

UPDATE: A blackout has been averted for the time-being, with CBS and Dish agreeing at the 11th hour to continue negotiating. So football fans with Dish will at least get through this weekend without having to worry about missing games on CBS. [More]

(Flyinace2000)

When it comes to the work week, Friday pretty much has Favorite Day locked down. But according to sources inside Consumerist, that happy day could get even better with one simple step: Signing up for the weekly Consumerist newsletter, delivered fresh to your email inbox every Friday. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

Apple Reportedly Pushing Beats Music App To Everyone’s iPhone, iPad With Next iOS Update

Apple’s first big move after purchasing Beats earlier this year – aside from firing people and removing competing products from its stores – reportedly involves pushing the subscription music service to all iPhones and iPads during an iOS update early next year. [More]

Nielsen To Finally Peel Back Curtain On What’s Actually Popular On Netflix, Amazon

Nielsen To Finally Peel Back Curtain On What’s Actually Popular On Netflix, Amazon

Sure, there’s a “Popular On Netflix” category on the streaming service, but are those actually the most-watched Netflix videos? For years, only Netflix has known how many of its users were watching which videos — and the company has not been eager to share that information. But the folks at Nielsen reportedly are going to start collecting ratings data for Netflix and Amazon videos, pulling back that curtain of secrecy. [More]

Copies Of ‘E.T.’ From The Atari Graveyard Sold For Up To $1,500

Copies Of ‘E.T.’ From The Atari Graveyard Sold For Up To $1,500

Last week, we shared the exciting news that a local historical society would auction a bunch of trash on eBay. Well, okay, that “trash” was really some of the millions of unsold Atari cartridges that were crushed, covered with cement, and left in the desert for three decades. They were left in the desert because nobody wanted them in 1983, but cartridges sold for as much as $1,537 on eBay, with auctions concluding this week. [More]

Verizon Has Made It More Expensive To Get Out Of Your Wireless Plan Early

Verizon Has Made It More Expensive To Get Out Of Your Wireless Plan Early

Verizon Wireless has updated its Customer Agreement to change how it handles early termination fees for people who cancel their service while still under contract. But rather than simply jacking up the total amount you would have to pay, Verizon now has an 8-month delay before the total begins to decrease. [More]

(Mark Amsterdam)

Broadcasters Get Court To Stop Consumers From Seeing How Much Cable Companies Pay For Content

The FCC is currently mulling over whether to give its stamp of approval to two huge mergers — Comcast/Time Warner Cable and AT&T/DirecTV — and is intending to make information available to third parties about the deals that that these pay-TV giants make with broadcasters. But even though you and every other cable subscriber wants to know exactly how much Comcast pays for access to channels like ESPN, MTV, and the major networks, the broadcasters want that info kept under lock and key — and they’ve asked the court to stop it from possibly going public. [More]

Why You Shouldn’t Get A Reverse Mortgage Just Because Fred Thompson Tells You To

Why You Shouldn’t Get A Reverse Mortgage Just Because Fred Thompson Tells You To

Turn on the TV and you’re just about guaranteed to come face-to-face with a celebrity or public figure selling a product or service. While those spokespeople may carry an air of respect and trust with consumers, what happens when the product they so happily lent their voice to turns out to have devastating affects on the consumer? Not much really, but it might be time for that to change. [More]

(vxla jojoling)

Starbucks Runs BOGO Holiday Drink Promo, Forgets To Specify ‘Holiday’ Drinks On Flyer

Reader Dave says that he’s a regular at his local Starbucks, and last week when he stopped by, the employees handed him a flyer. It promoted some special events this week surrounding the release of the chain’s holiday gift items and themed beverage items. Part of that is a buy one, get one free deal for holiday beverages every afternoon for the rest of this week. That was what the press release and e-mails to customers said. Dave’s flyer said something different. [More]

Barbie Girl Scout, Cartoon Network App, Mini Mall Lead This Year’s List Of Worst Toys

Just one of the several available stores for building your child's Mini Mall.

Like it or not, holiday shopping season is upon us. That means it’s time for sales, decorations, crowds, stress, and the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood’s annual list of the year’s worst toys. [More]

Comcast Introduces Talking TV Guide For Visually Impaired

Comcast Introduces Talking TV Guide For Visually Impaired

Fifteen months ago, we told you that Comcast was developing a talking version of its TV listings for use by visually impaired subscribers. Today, the company announced that it will be introducing the feature to users on its X1 platform. [More]

(Chris Rief)

Amazon Prime Won’t Charge Extra For Streaming Ultra HD Video

With prices dropping — and some sets available for around $1,000 — Ultra HD or 4K TV is gradually grabbing a foothold in consumers’ homes. Yet there is still little native content available for these sets. That may change soon with Amazon confirming it will begin offering 4K video to Amazon Prime customers before the year is out, and it won’t charge extra. [More]

(Great Beyond)

Calling BS On ISPs’ Claims That Reclassifying Broadband Will Hurt Investment

Yesterday, President Obama came out in favor of reclassifying broadband as a telecommunications infrastructure, meaning that the FCC could regulate it in the same ways it regulates landline telephone service. Immediately, cable companies began shouting that such regulation would cripple investment in broadband. Alas, this is just pure nonsense intended to instill fear and raise the hackles of those who bristle at any form of government regulation. [More]

The Google barge in San Francisco Bay in 2013. It's since been towed to Stockton, CA, where it sits idle.

What Happened To Those Google Barges?

Remember a year ago, when Google-constructed barges popped up in the waters off San Francisco and Portland (the one in Maine)? They were supposed to be floating showrooms, but they never opened and have since been towed away or sold. But what exactly caused Google to scuttle its seafaring plans? [More]

With Standalone Showtime Service, Will 2015 Be The Year Of The Cord-Cutter?

With Standalone Showtime Service, Will 2015 Be The Year Of The Cord-Cutter?

If you recently read the announcement that HBO and Starz would each soon be launching their own standalone streaming services and thought, “Well, I still can’t dump cable because then I wouldn’t be able to watch Showtime,” here’s some good news — the network is planning to launch its own online-only service at some point in 2015, which may remove the final barricade to cord-cutting for some consumers. [More]

Comcast Apologizes For Week’s Second Large-Scale Outage

Comcast Apologizes For Week’s Second Large-Scale Outage

In the wake of its second high-profile TV service outage this week, Comcast is apologizing to affected customers, many of whom had to find out through social media that there was a widespread problem because they couldn’t get through to Kabletown over the phone or online. [More]

Microsoft Decides To Stop Charging For Mobile Office Apps

Microsoft Decides To Stop Charging For Mobile Office Apps

Realizing that it can’t make money if no one uses its products anymore, Microsoft has decided to allow iOS and Android users to access most of the functions in its mobile Office suite of apps — Word, Excel, PowerPoint — without having to pay a hefty annual subscription fee. [More]