Lumber Liquidators Sued Over Formaldehyde Allegations

Lumber Liquidators Sued Over Formaldehyde Allegations

Only days after a 60 Minutes report on the allegedly high formaldehyde levels in wood products sold by Lumber Liquidators, consumers have filed a potential class action against the company in federal court. [More]

The marketer of products such as Snuggies and Magic Mesh door covers must pay $8 million to settle charges of deceiving consumers.

Marketer Of Snuggies, Perfect Brownie Pans, Others Must Pay $8M For Allegedly Deceiving Consumers

The marketer of popular “as-seen-on-TV” products such as Snuggies, Magic Mesh door covers and Perfect Brownie Pans must pay $8 million to resolve federal and state charges it deceived consumers with promises of buy-one-get-one-free promotions and then charged exorbitant fees for processing and handling, nearly doubling the cost of the products. [More]

Comcast Not Afraid Of Streaming Services; Won’t Commit To Playing Nice With Them

Comcast Not Afraid Of Streaming Services; Won’t Commit To Playing Nice With Them

Earlier this week, a Dish executive claimed that Comcast was afraid of so-called over-the-top streaming services like Dish’s Sling TV and that the cable giant could use its size and influence to prevent broadcasters from signing onto Sling and others. Now Comcast is saying it has nothing to fear from these new services, but won’t commit to avoiding deals that make it difficult for them to compete. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Science Says You Shop Differently If You’re Looking Up At Products

Just about everyone knows that the vital shelf space on a supermarket shelf is right below eye level, where your eyes are naturally drawn to products and you don’t have to crouch or crane your neck to see. A new study claims that vertical positioning on a shelf doesn’t just impact whether or not we see a product, but what kinds of purchasing decisions we make. [More]

Though Netflix is giving Beasts of No Nation a simultaneous release in theaters and on its subscription service, the film will have limited early theatrical screenings to qualify for awards consideration.

Alamo Drafthouse Won’t Join Theater Chain Boycott Of Netflix Movie

Yesterday, Netflix announced that it would be releasing a new movie, Beasts of No Nation, later this year simultaneously on its streaming service and in theaters, leading the nation’s biggest exhibitors to cry boycott and say they will refuse to show the film. But not Alamo Drafthouse, which doesn’t seem fazed by having to compete for consumers who can just stay home and see the movie. [More]

(Morton Fox)

McDonald’s To Use Chickens Raised Without Controversial Antibiotics

Last week we expressed hope that new McDonald’s CEO Steve Easterbrook would do more than pay lip service to concerns about over-use of medically important antibiotics in farm animals, and today there appears to be some not-bad news coming out of the Golden Arches. The fast food mega-chain says it will only source chickens raised without the use of antibiotics that are important to humans and will offer milk that doesn’t contain artificial growth hormone. [More]

Sling Users Get More Streaming TV Today With Addition Of AMC, IFC

Sling Users Get More Streaming TV Today With Addition Of AMC, IFC

One of the most common knocks against Dish’s Sling TV streaming service is that it just doesn’t offer you enough channels for the $20/month subscription, but today Sling will get more attractive to some as AMC and IFC are added to the base package of channels at no additional cost, while users also have the option of a $5 premium bundle from Epix. [More]

Dish: Comcast Could Still Use Its Size To Block Streaming Content

Dish: Comcast Could Still Use Its Size To Block Streaming Content

The FCC’s recently approved net neutrality rules will prohibit all Internet service providers from blocking any legal content from being sent or received by their users. But when an ISP also controls the nation’s largest pay-TV audience, perhaps it could use that leverage to prevent certain content from ever going online in the first place. [More]

4 Things We Still Don’t Know About Net Neutrality

4 Things We Still Don’t Know About Net Neutrality

The FCC voted yesterday to reclassify broadband and protect the open internet. In other words, at long last, we have a net neutrality rule. And that’s great! But there is still a lot we don’t know, and there are a lot of questions left unanswered. Here are the major things we don’t know, and parts we’re waiting to better understand. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Privacy Advocates Call For Investigation Into Samsung Smart TVs

Samsung’s Smart TVs have come under scrutiny recently after people learned the company’s privacy policy hinted that things we say within earshot of our televisions may be recorded and uploaded to third-party transcription services. While executives for the company have worked to calm people’s fears, a privacy group is now asked federal regulators to take a look into the matter. [More]

(Steve)

FCC Officially Votes To Protect Net Neutrality, Reclassify Broadband

In a landmark decision today, the FCC voted 3-2 to create enforceable, bright-line rules protecting the open internet using their Title II authority to reclassify broadband internet as a telecommunications service. [More]

FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler speaking at the FCC's Open Meeting on February 26, 2015.

FCC Votes To Allow Cities To Expand Broadband Networks

As expected, the FCC today has confirmed an order permitting two cities to expand their existing municipal fiber broadband networks despite state-level laws that block them from doing so. [More]

(Twitter: @jlump_PGA)

Prank Or Honest Mistake? Jimmy John’s Renames Customer “Blumpkin”

Anyone who has ever seen their name go from “Mark” to “Mork” on the side of a Starbucks cup, or “Morran” to “Moron” on restaurant reservations knows that names sometimes get lost in translation when scrawled by a foodservice worker in a hurry. So how can you tell when it’s an honest mistake or you’re the victim of a rude prank? [More]

New Products: Girl Scout Cookie Ice Cream Bars, Taco Bell Sauce Packet Chips

New Products: Girl Scout Cookie Ice Cream Bars, Taco Bell Sauce Packet Chips

This week, we learned about two exciting products from different food outlets. One is being test-marketed, and the other is in grocery and big-box stores across the land. What they have in common is taking a familiar and beloved product and translating it into a different but perfectly logical format. Those products? Girl Scout Thin Mints ice cream bars, and Taco Bell hot sauce tortilla chips. [More]

Google Fiber, Other ISP Heads Agree: We’ll Keep Investing No Matter What The FCC Does About Net Neutrality

Google Fiber, Other ISP Heads Agree: We’ll Keep Investing No Matter What The FCC Does About Net Neutrality

With only hours remaining in the countdown to tomorrow’s net neutrality vote, everyone from Silicon Valley to Capitol Hill is getting their last words in. At a tech policy event in Washington, DC yesterday, a panel of ISP executives spoke about the future of competition, innovation, and network deployment as the regulations and the marketplace change around them. And when the moderator directly asked the speakers if Title II regulation would diminish investment in their networks, the answer was the same all around: nope. [More]

What You Need To Know About Tomorrow’s Votes On Net Neutrality And Municipal Broadband

What You Need To Know About Tomorrow’s Votes On Net Neutrality And Municipal Broadband

On Thursday morning, the Federal Communications Commission will sit down to discuss and vote on two big issues — net neutrality and municipal broadband — that the cable and telecom industries have campaigned heavily to defeat and obscure. Because of these industry-backed efforts and the legalese involved, many consumers are having difficulty separating myth from reality. In an effort to cut through that haze, we’ve attempted to answer the most pressing questions about these two topics before tomorrow’s vote. [More]

(Alan Cleaver)

FTC Files Lawsuit To Shut Down Deceptive Payday Loan Debt Relief Operation

It’s probably safe to assume that consumers stuck in the payday loan debt-trap have enough financial issues without being deceived by a company promising to make their debts disappear. There may be one less unsavory debt relief company around after the Federal Trade Commission sued to stop an operation that targeted millions of consumers. [More]

A group of 15 Corinthian College students are refusing to repay their federal student loans.

Current, Former Corinthian College Students Go On “Debt Strike,” Refuse To Pay Private & Federal Loans

With for-profit educator Corinthian Colleges Inc. selling off campuses and closing schools, thousands of Everest, WyoTech, and Heald College students are waiting to learn the fate of the more than $1 billion in private and federal student loan debt used to finance their education. While the Department of Education and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau have worked to secure deals in which some of that debt will be forgiven, some students are increasing the pressure on such deals by staging a “debt strike.” [More]