Consumer Reports Shares Mosquito Repellent Ratings For Zika Virus Prevention

Consumer Reports Shares Mosquito Repellent Ratings For Zika Virus Prevention

Even if you’ve only been half paying attention to the news, you’ve heard something about the Zika virus, even if it’s only that a bunch of people have changed their travel plans, governments are advising couples to delay trying to conceive children, and someone had to rename a car. It’s spread mainly by mosquitoes, , and that’s something that our product-testing cousins down the hall at Consumer Reports can help with. They test mosquito repellents, and have released their ratings to non-subscribers. [More]

Ads for these products promised rapid weight loss (without anything to back up that claim), used fake customer testimonials, and promised "risk-free" trials that were all but impossible to get out of.

Scammy Sellers Of AF Plus, Final Trim Weight-Loss Pills Made Millions From Bogus “Risk-Free” Trials

You may have heard radio ads for weight loss supplements named AF Plus and Final Trim, promising “24 hours of fat burning power” and “maximum weight loss,” along with supposed real-world testimonials about how well these pills worked — and how you can try them now through a “risk-free” trial. Problem is, those people in the ads claiming they lost all that weight are just as fictitious as the free trial. [More]

Fabletics Seeks New Subscribers By Opening Stores In Malls

Fabletics Seeks New Subscribers By Opening Stores In Malls

Fabletics is an athleticwear company for women that sells nice workout wear outfits for about $50. They operate on a subscription model: every month, you’ll get billed for a subscription unless you log in and decide not to buy anything that month. It’s like Columbia House for yoga pants. Yet the company is doing something sort of unexpected for a retailer that uses this business model: they’re opening a seventh real-life store, with the new one at the Mall of America in Minnesota. [More]

Themarcogoon49

Don’t Get Stuck Paying For A Flight You Can’t Take; Know Your Airline’s 24-Hour Cancellation Policy

You can spend months, and thousands of dollars, putting together a trip abroad, but no matter how much effort you take to avoid travel trouble, unforeseen circumstances can force you to change your plans. Thankfully, most airlines flying to and from the U.S. have a policy that lets passengers cancel tickets within 24 hours of booking. Note that we said “most airlines” — not all. [More]

Readers Share Secrets Of The Starbucks ‘Undertow,’ Or Whatever They Call It

Readers Share Secrets Of The Starbucks ‘Undertow,’ Or Whatever They Call It

Earlier this week, we sent one of our editors on a mission: to find out whether something billed as a Starbucks secret menu item exists at all the chain’s stores. The short answer: no, but if you describe the drink, any store will make you one, even though they’re kind of a pain and usually reserved for special occasions. [More]

(TheGlassPeople)

Report: Dov Charney Creating Another Retail Chain In American Apparel’s Likeness

Now that Dov Charney’s dreams of owning American Apparel again have been totally and completely dashed, it’s time for a new plan: according to a new report, if he can’t have the company he founded, Charney is just going to start over with a new one. [More]

Secret Menu Adventure: Consumerist Tries To Order An ‘Undertow’ At Starbucks

Secret Menu Adventure: Consumerist Tries To Order An ‘Undertow’ At Starbucks

Here at Consumerist’s virtual headquarters, we were reading a Starbucks fan blog, as we do, and noticed a passing reference that took us by surprise. A post mentioned a “secret menu” drink called the Undertow, which consists of hot espresso on top of cold half-and-half and flavored syrup. This sounded both confusing and delicious, so we made the editor whose office is closest to a Starbucks go out and try to order one. [More]

Comcast User’s Bot Tweets At Comcast Whenever His Internet Speed Gets Too Slow

Comcast User’s Bot Tweets At Comcast Whenever His Internet Speed Gets Too Slow

Just because you pay for a certain internet speed doesn’t mean you get it all the time. That’s just a sad fact of life: those speeds are an “up to” promise, not a “minimum guarantee” promise. But just how often is a lapse below a certain threshold acceptable? And given that internet speeds are variable, how would you make sure your provider knows? [More]

Tesla Applied For A Dealership License In Michigan

Tesla Applied For A Dealership License In Michigan

Michigan residents keen on purchasing a Tesla may no longer have to travel to Chicago, Ohio, Indiana, or Canada: Tesla has applied for dealership licenses to sell and service its electric vehicles in the state nearly two years after legislators passed laws banning the company’s direct-to-customer sales model.  [More]

Time Warner Wants Hulu To Stop Airing Current Seasons Of TV Shows

Time Warner Wants Hulu To Stop Airing Current Seasons Of TV Shows

One of the things that has allowed Hulu to compete in the streaming video subscription market is the fact that it offers users the ability to watch some currently airing shows shortly after they’ve premiered on TV. But a new report claims that if content powerhouse Time Warner Inc. has its say, even Hulu subscribers may have to wait a long time before seeing recently aired shows. [More]

The Consumerist Guide To Understanding Your Comcast Bill

The Consumerist Guide To Understanding Your Comcast Bill

When you sign up for services — some combination of TV, broadband, and/or phone — from your cable company, you’re told you’ll pay something like $49 or $89 a month… and yet the price you actually pay can be 30-40% or more on top of that, thanks to a heap of sometimes confusing charges and fees. Which ones do you blame the government for, and which are made up by your cable company? One cable company at a time, we’re going to use real customers’ bills to break it down. First up: Comcast. [More]

Stanford Law Professor: T-Mobile’s ‘Binge On’ Violates Net Neutrality Rules

Stanford Law Professor: T-Mobile’s ‘Binge On’ Violates Net Neutrality Rules

Last fall, T-Mobile introduced Binge On, an optional program that lets users stream certain video streams without counting the data against their monthly allotments. YouTube and others have accused the company of throttling data in order to make this happen, and a new report from Stanford University claims that T-Mo’s actions are in violation of federal “net neutrality” rules. [More]

Apple Kills Off Free iTunes Radio In Favor Of Apple Music

Apple Kills Off Free iTunes Radio In Favor Of Apple Music

As of today, Apple’s free iTunes Radio is dead. Long live Apple Music — or at least that’s apparently the company’s plan as it officially shut down the ad-supported service today. [More]

(Eric Arnold)

VW Buyback Plan Seems More Likely As Company Struggles To Find Fix For Emission-Cheating Vehicles

Since Volkswagen admitted last year to using “defeat devices” in certain cars to cheat on emissions tests, some owners and consumer advocates have pushed for the carmaker to buy back affected vehicles from customers. VW had resisted this idea, but without any other resolution in the offing, a mass buyback offer is beginning to look possible.
[More]

T-Mobile Adds Amazon Video To Binge On, Claims Users Are Streaming Twice As Much

T-Mobile Adds Amazon Video To Binge On, Claims Users Are Streaming Twice As Much

Three months after launching its Binge On streaming streaming video program, which doesn’t count content from certain partners against a customers’ monthly data allotment, T-Mobile has made new deals with Amazon and others to include their content. Additionally, the company claims that Binge On has doubled the amount of video its customers are watching. [More]

(Photos in the Sunset)

New York Attorney General Calls For Caps On Ticket Resale Prices, Outlawing Of Scalper Bots

When you go to buy tickets for a popular concert or sporting event, you likely know that you’ll ultimately have to make your purchase from a ticket reseller who will mark up the price to try maximize their profit. But the New York state attorney general is calling on the state legislature to put new rules into place that would protect consumers from scalpers who swoop in and buy up every ticket before they are available to actual fans. [More]

(cmorran123)

Circuit City Is Returning From The Dead: Yes, Again

Back in 2009, the medium-box consumer electronics chain Circuit City closed. Systemax, the owner of TigerDirect, acquired the brand’s website and customer list, and kept it going until 2012. Late last year, Systemax decided to shut down its technology business, and that included selling the twice-defunct Circuit City brand. Now yet another company has acquired the brand and wants to make a go of it as physical retail stores. [More]

Toys “R” Us & Babies “R” Us Offering Discounts For Return Of Potentially Dangerous Products

Toys “R” Us & Babies “R” Us Offering Discounts For Return Of Potentially Dangerous Products

Each year manufacturers and federal safety regulators initiate safety recalls for a number of baby- and child-focused products. One major retailer wants to ensure you’ve rid your home of these potentially dangerous items by offering discounts if you trade in the goods for new ones.   [More]