Restoration Hardware Dumps 17 Pounds Of “Sustainable” Catalogs On My Porch

Restoration Hardware Dumps 17 Pounds Of “Sustainable” Catalogs On My Porch

Two years ago, Restoration Hardware got some media attention for putting out a 5.5 pound, almost 1000-page-long “Source Book,” which is effectively a catalog. Maybe they want even more attention this year, which is why they’ve dispatched UPS to dump 17 pounds of catalogs on customers’ doorsteps. [More]

Here’s Why Florists’ Websites And Reality Will Never Match Up

Here’s Why Florists’ Websites And Reality Will Never Match Up

A common consumer complaint about flower deliveries is that the arrangements that show up on our loved ones’ doorsteps isn’t as tall or full as the pictures we saw of the arrangement online. A former florist wrote to Consumerist to explain why this is. The photos from FTD, Teleflora, and other Big Flower companies are staged to look nice for the camera, but real-life is three-dimensional. [More]

What Could Possibly Be Inside Car-Sized Amazon Locker With A Nissan Logo On It?

What Could Possibly Be Inside Car-Sized Amazon Locker With A Nissan Logo On It?

Yet again, Amazon and Nissan have teamed up to bring the world a mystery involving an enormous Amazon-branded container out in public. Last time, the massive Amazon box on a flatbed truck contained a Nissan Versa, which was a great cross-promotion. What could be inside the mysterious giant Amazon locker in San Francisco? Maybe the Nissan logo on one side provides a clue. [More]

Webrooming Is Showrooming In Reverse, Marketers Pretend That It’s A Thing

Webrooming Is Showrooming In Reverse, Marketers Pretend That It’s A Thing

Showrooming, as many people who walk into Best Buy stores know, is when customers check out an item in a local store, then turn around and purchase it online at a lower price. What happens if you do the opposite of showrooming, though? What about when you check out a product online, then buy it locally because they have the best price or you’re impatient? One marketing firm thinks that we should call that “Webrooming.” [More]

Apparently, It’s Very Difficult To Box Up Cat Toys

Apparently, It’s Very Difficult To Box Up Cat Toys

Reader James was not impressed last week when we posted a picture of a cat toy that Amazon shipped inside another cat toy (or, as us people without cats call them, a very large “cardboard box.” James assured us that he could top one cat toy in a mere oversized long, thin box: he received two cat toys in a box large enough to ship at least four cats.* [More]

Another Amazon Prime Order, Another Delivery Fake-Out From Ontrac

Another Amazon Prime Order, Another Delivery Fake-Out From Ontrac

“OnTrac has made Amazon Prime a very expensive joke in Los Angeles,” reader Matthew wrote to Consumerist. How much of a joke? “This has happened at least six times in as many months to my wife and me. Tried contacting OnTrac and couldn’t get through to a human being.” That’s not a very funny joke. Matthew and his wife are far from alone in their dissatisfaction with OnTrac, though. [More]

Herbalife To Re-Train Distributors Not To Say Products Cure Brain Tumors

Herbalife To Re-Train Distributors Not To Say Products Cure Brain Tumors

When you go to a meeting to learn more about potentially joining a multi-level marketing organization, you expect to hear testimonials about how the product has changed lives. You should not expect to hear about how the company’s products have cured brain tumors and performed other impossible feats. At least, that’s what Herbalife says after undercover reporters from ABC News filmed Herbalife distributors doing just that. [More]

Why?

This Is A Paper Towel Holder USB Hub

Have you ever looked at your paper towel holder and thought to yourself, “Wow, I really wish I could plug my smartphone into that”? No, neither have most other people, but the TowlHub still exists. [More]

All Squash Weighs Four Ounces At Stop & Shop, Regardless Of Size

All Squash Weighs Four Ounces At Stop & Shop, Regardless Of Size

We all learned in elementary school that an object’s mass and its size are different things. A pound of cotton candy is much larger than a pound of, say, raisins, because raisins are so much denser. Yet this package of squash that reader Adam spotted at Stop & Shop would have us believe that some of the same vegetable are twice as dense as others. [More]

Best Buy Continues Transformation Into Gadget Food Court With Mini Sony Stores

Best Buy Continues Transformation Into Gadget Food Court With Mini Sony Stores

Best Buy wants to stage a comeback, coaxing customers back into its stores with price-matching and promises of top-notch service. Maybe the most appealing idea that the chain has had is to transform itself into an electronics food court, featuring mini-stores from individual manufacturers. Last year, this plan started with Samsung and Microsoft, and next up are mini home theater stores from Sony. [More]

Amazon Stupid Shipping Gang Ships Cat Toy Inside Second Cat Toy

Amazon Stupid Shipping Gang Ships Cat Toy Inside Second Cat Toy

We can’t imagine how difficult it must be to box up packages in an online fulfillment warehouse, working with time constraints to find the best container for an unfathomable variety of products. Yet sometimes the packaging choices themselves are unfathomable, and that’s when we point out that the Stupid Shipping Gang has been at work. Stephen sent along this photo of his cat toy packaged in a comically oversized box. [More]

GameStop Will Close Around 125 Stores, Open Up To 400. Wait, What?

GameStop Will Close Around 125 Stores, Open Up To 400. Wait, What?

You might associate GameStop with video game consoles and software for your computer, but the chain is looking ahead. They’re looking toward a future where everyone plays games on the mobile phones in their pockets…and, more importantly, needs somewhere to buy those phones. That means closing around 125 GameStop stores, and adding new shops in other brands that the company owns: Spring Mobile, Simply Mac, and authorized sellers of Cricket Wireless. [More]

Coach Responds To Falling Profits By Offering Pricier Handbags

Coach Responds To Falling Profits By Offering Pricier Handbags

There’s a limited number of women who are interested in spending between $200 and $400 for a purse, and that market is becoming more crowded. What’s a company like Coach to do in the face of falling sales and falling profits? Sell more expensive bags targeted at more affluent customers, of course. [More]

Where Can I Trade In My Old Electronics And Games For Fast Cash?

Where Can I Trade In My Old Electronics And Games For Fast Cash?

There are a lot of websites out there that are happy to take your electronics, games, music, and movies off your hands for a modest fee. You unload your stuff with a minimum of effort, and the buyer resells your old crap in volumes that regular consumers can hardly comprehend. Where’s the best place to unload your stuff, though? Does it really matter? [More]

Barnes & Noble Might Have Smaller Stores, Still Won’t Price-Match Own Website

Barnes & Noble Might Have Smaller Stores, Still Won’t Price-Match Own Website

It’s pretty intuitive that you don’t need a lot of retail floor space to sell e-books. Even a display of e-reader gadgets doesn’t take up as much room as shelf after shelf of books. that’s why absolutely no one should be surprised that Barnes & Noble might be considering stores with a smaller footprint. [More]

It’s Florida Customers’ Turn To Pay Sales Tax On Amazon Purchases

It’s Florida Customers’ Turn To Pay Sales Tax On Amazon Purchases

There’s good news and bad news for Florida: yes, there is an Amazon distribution warehouse in their fine state now, which means faster delivery of the stuff they impulsively ordered at 3 A.M., and also gives some people jobs. The downside to this sprawling city of stuff is that it means Amazon now has a physical location in their state, and they’ll have to pay sales tax on their purchases. [More]

This Is Not A Welcoming Retail Establishment

This Is Not A Welcoming Retail Establishment

Reader David was walking down a street in Brooklyn when he noticed this unfriendly-looking retail establishment. He called it the “least welcoming front door ever on a jewelry store,” and we have to agree. It would be less welcoming if it were locked, maybe. [More]

(Checo Che)

LaCie Admits Customer Data Was Breached For A Year

You may be familiar with LaCie, a French company that makes computer hard drives. They’re now owned by Seagate, and maintain their own online storefront, which was one of many hit by hackers in a recent credit card data breach. This time, the baddies exploited vulnerabilities in the Web application platform ColdFusion. This breach has been ongoing for almost an entire year. [More]