(Erin Nekervis)

1-Hour Photo Shops Are The Disappearingest Business In America

If you think that video stores are the business category that has disappeared the fastest, you’re wrong. If you found an exposed roll of film in a drawer and wanted to find out what was on it, where would you take it? Most likely, your local photo store is gone, and you might have a drugstore or other business that still does a few rolls of film every week. [More]

Apple Now Requires ResearchKit Apps To Get Ethics Board Approval

Apple Now Requires ResearchKit Apps To Get Ethics Board Approval

Since introducing ResearchKit, its open-source framework for scientists to develop iPhone apps for medical research, Apple has made a few tweaks to the submission guidelines for apps that aim to collect and use sensitive medical data. One new addition is that anyone submitting an app that does research on humans must submit proof that the study has been approved by an independent ethics review board. [More]

Shoplifting Suspect Wearing ‘Won’t Be Caught’ T-Shirt Remains At Large

Shoplifting Suspect Wearing ‘Won’t Be Caught’ T-Shirt Remains At Large

The Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office in Florida want to make sure that the prediction made on a woman’s t-shirt doesn’t come true. The message in huge white letters on her black t-shirt was clear: “Won’t Be Caught,” it said. Unfortunately, she was caught on camera while allegedly scooping up almost $1,500 worth of perfume and cologne bottle at an Ulta store in Tampa. [More]

Lumber Liquidators Faces Federal Charges Of Selling Illegally Sourced Wood

Lumber Liquidators Faces Federal Charges Of Selling Illegally Sourced Wood

Things are not going particularly well at Lumber Liquidators right now. Not only is the company facing more than 100 customer lawsuits and a federal consumer safety investigation over flooring it sold that may be releasing dangerous levels of formaldehyde, but the company is also facing criminal charges for selling wood that suppliers may have harvested illegally. [More]

Perhaps You Need A Monotasking Twinkie-Maker

Perhaps You Need A Monotasking Twinkie-Maker

Why would you use your oven when you could have an entire pantry full of baking devices that are devoted to one extremely specific food item, and often don’t make that food item all that well? That’s why we’re fascinated with these appliances, which can make anything from ice cream sandwiches to pretzels, but cannot create more storage space in your house. [More]

(C x 2)

Here at Consumerist, we’re fascinated with the various things that shoplifters have removed from stores by shoving them down their pants. We’ve seen people accused of using this method to steal meat, seafood, puppies, more meat, more seafood, and a chainsaw. Police in New Jersey seek a man who shoved three pair of women’s sneakers down his pants at a Kohl’s store. [NJ.com]

(NYC♥NYC)

Failure To Be Undeniably Hot No Longer An Impediment To Getting A Job At Abercrombie & Fitch

In a further attempt to shed its image as a place where rippling six-packs and bronzed bodies go to commune with the hot powers that be, Abercrombie & Fitch is doing away with its policy on having only super hot sales associates in its stores, opening up its doors to anyone with a dream of selling khaki cargo shorts and pre-ripped jeans. [More]

How To Survive A Trip To IKEA Without Dumping Your Partner

How To Survive A Trip To IKEA Without Dumping Your Partner

Hardware stores aren’t the only retail establishments that pose an existential threat to domestic partnerships. Mega-home-store IKEA can also be a treacherous place, where the issues in a relationship surface as you search for items to fill your home together, then get them home and assemble them. That’s why one therapist actually uses the store’s flat-pack furniture as an exercise for patients: they have to assemble a piece of flat-pack furniture together and report back on how they communicated during the process. [More]

(markheybo)

Sears Announces Final Two Stores They’ll Be Sharing With Primark

Last year, as part of their “taking on roommates” strategy of keeping their doors open, Sears announced that they were leasing parts of seven stores to Primark, a clothing retailer out of Ireland. Sears has finally named all seven of the stores where Primark will be moving in. All seven are in the Northeast. [More]

(The Searcher)

Home Depot Expands Spring Black Friday To Spring Cyber Week

For a store that sells supplies for improving homes and planting gardens, it’s true that spring is kind of like Christmas. That’s why it makes sense that Home Depot is expanding their “Spring Black Friday” event out to a Spring Cyber Week. However, while it makes sense, it’s still stupid. [More]

(Eric Norris)

Chinese Luxury Car Buyers Shop The Very Unglamorous Gray Market

Here at Consumerist, we’re fascinated with the global gray market: the system of parallel imports that gives us Omega watches from Paraguay at Costco and a pirate Trader Joe’s store in Canada. There are even bigger things that trade on the gray market, though: in Shanghai, there’s a place where luxury car buyers can save money by purchasing cars that haven’t been imported through official channels. [More]

WashuOtaku)

JCPenney Executive Accidentally E-Mails Sales Figures To Stock Analyst

Here’s a bit of cheery news about a venerable American retailer: JCPenney’s comparable store sales as calculated so far for the first quarter were up 6% over last year. Unfortunately, the reason why we know this is somewhat less cheery. Someone described as a “senior official” at the company accidentally e-mailed early figures that weren’t yet public for the first quarter of 2015 to a securities analyst. [More]

Home Depot’s ‘Spring Black Friday’ Stupidity Is Back

Home Depot’s ‘Spring Black Friday’ Stupidity Is Back

Retailers really love the concept of “Black Friday.” They love it so much that they’re trying to expand it in all directions. Instead of the day after Thanksgiving and the kickoff to the Christmas shopping season, Black Friday is now a year-round event that is an inclusive alternative to “Christmas in July.” Now it’s a spring event, too. [More]

(Colin)

Study: People Try Apple Pay Once, Don’t Go Back

The prospect of using our phones in place of wallets is exciting to absent-minded people everywhere, but how well is adoption of mobile payments going in the real world? A recent survey looking at adoption of Apple Pay a few months out from its introduction shows that consumers are enthused about it, but are having trouble finding retailers where they can use the service. [More]

(Jamie McCaffrey)

Best Buy Closes Future Shop Stores, Will Turn Half Into Best Buys

Future Shop is the best name ever given to an electronics retailer, and also a chain in Canada that for the last 14 years has been owned by Best Buy. Best Buy also operates stores in Canada, which means that Future Shop has really been competing with itself. Until now. All of Future Shop’s current stores closed abruptly this weekend, and half will soon re-open as Best Buy stores. [More]

Lululemon’s New Anti-Ball-Crushing Pants Are A Huge Hit

Lululemon’s New Anti-Ball-Crushing Pants Are A Huge Hit

If any athletic wear company knows about the importance of paying attention to their customers’ genitals, it’s Lululemon. The company lost much of its leadership and annoyed a lot of people over a 2013 fiasco involving pants that were inexplicably translucent in the crotch area. Now the company has found success by explicitly marketing a new line of pants for men for their non-testicle-crushing properties. [More]

Leaked Contract: Amazon Makes Warehouse Workers Sign 18-Month Non-Compete Agreements

Leaked Contract: Amazon Makes Warehouse Workers Sign 18-Month Non-Compete Agreements

Amazon warehouses, even the ones powered by amazing shelf robots, depend mostly on human labor to get the stuff off the shelves and into boxes. The job doesn’t pay very much and is grueling, and also has high turnover. Oh, and employees are asked to sign 18-month non-compete contracts that ban them from working for any competitor of Amazon. [More]

Watch Workers Replace A Retention Pond With A Trader Joe’s

Watch Workers Replace A Retention Pond With A Trader Joe’s

The dilemma at a shopping center in Schaumburg, Illinois was a true modern one: Trader Joe’s wanted to build a store there, but there was no vacant space in which to build a store. The resourceful owners decided to make more space by covering an artificial pond with the store and its parking lot. [More]