Fisker To Replace Karma Battery That Quit During Consumer Reports Testing

Fisker To Replace Karma Battery That Quit During Consumer Reports Testing

Consumer Reports couldn’t even get their $108,000 Fisker Karma test car through its first round of tests before its battery went kaput. And now, Fisker says they’ll be replacing said defective parts in the luxury electronic vehicles. [More]

Consumer Reports Spends $107K On Fisker Karma; It Breaks Down In Parking Lot

Consumer Reports Spends $107K On Fisker Karma; It Breaks Down In Parking Lot

As many of you probably already know, our kin at Consumer Reports buy everything they test at retail. Which means that they aren’t testing a product that has been optimized or checked out by the manufacturer in advance. It also means that every once in a while, a $107,000 car breaks down in the parking lot. [More]

Annual Consumer Reports Auto Issue Top Picks: Toyota Cleans Up

Our brilliant benefactors at Consumer Reports have released their annual auto issue, and if Toyota was allowed to brag about it, they’d be tooting their horns over the fact that they took five of the top spots out of 10 categories. The April issue is jam-packed with car ratings for the discerning consumer, but companies aren’t allowed to use those scores for commercial use. Sorry! [More]

Owning A Smaller, Cheaper Car Doesn't Necessarily Mean You'll Pay Less For Insurance

Thinking you’ve scored a great deal by buying a smaller, cheaper car might not be entirely correct, as one report indicates owners of such vehicles might end up paying more in insurance than some of their fellow drivers. [More]

Car Seat Sensors Scan Your Butt To Protect Vehicle From Theft

Car Seat Sensors Scan Your Butt To Protect Vehicle From Theft

Some backsides are already alarming, but if new anti-theft technology takes off, the wrong rear really could set off alarms. Researchers in Japan have come up with a car seat that scans a driver’s posterior to verify identity before a car starts. [More]

The Cars Everyone Loved To Hate On In 2011

The Cars Everyone Loved To Hate On In 2011

In 2011, there were plenty of cars with a lot of hype behind them, only to end up doing poorly with consumers. Failing to meet high expectations could almost be worse than just being as terrible as everyone thought you would be. So let’s toast a few of the flops of the 2011 American car market, shall we? [More]

Car Dealerships Want To Get Rid Of Certain Models During Holiday Sales

Car Dealerships Want To Get Rid Of Certain Models During Holiday Sales

During holiday sales weekends, car dealerships want to lure you in with big deals on delightful new cars. But during these weekends, and in the weeks after, there are really only a few dealers want you to drive off the lot: a luxury ride, a big truck or an unpopular model. [More]

Electric 'Boozer' Car Whizzes Past 1,000 Miles On Single Battery Charge

Electric 'Boozer' Car Whizzes Past 1,000 Miles On Single Battery Charge

Detractors of all-electric vehicles, beware. A group of German automotive students has set a new distance record for EVs — 1,013 miles on a single charge — and may point the way to future battery-powered cars that won’t give owners “range anxiety.” [More]

High Gas Prices Aren't Giving The Blues To Motown Car Makers

High Gas Prices Aren't Giving The Blues To Motown Car Makers

When gas hit $4 a gallon in 2008, Detroit’s Big Three auto makers took it on the chin as American demand for big, fuel-thirsty SUVs and trucks suddenly disappeared. But even with gas prices again hovering north of $4, American car companies are whistling a much happier tune–all the way to the bank. [More]

Auto Manufacturers Slim Down Cars To Increase Fuel Economy

Auto Manufacturers Slim Down Cars To Increase Fuel Economy

As a reaction to rising gas prices, new cars are becoming lighter and more fuel-efficient. Auto manufacturers are scrounging for ways to cut the weight of vehicles, shifting to lighter materials and ditching some parts altogether. [More]

Going Green Doesn't Always Mean Plugging In When It Comes To Cars

Going Green Doesn't Always Mean Plugging In When It Comes To Cars

You don’t have to buy a car that plugs into an outlet to be green or run on batteries, says a new scorecard of the most eco-friendly vehicles on the road. [More]

Is It Time To Get A Cheap Dealer-Financed Car Loan?

Is It Time To Get A Cheap Dealer-Financed Car Loan?

With banks continuing to stick to high (well, higher) lending standards, and car dealers eager to move inventory, now could be the right time to buy a new car and finance it through the dealer, according to SmartMoney. Rates are as low as zero percent, and . “nothing beats 0%,” says Paul Taylor, of the National Automobile Dealers Association. [More]

Mercedes Drivers Are The Most Ticketed; GM Drivers The Least

Mercedes Drivers Are The Most Ticketed; GM Drivers The Least

A new study by an insurance industry analytics service reveals the vehicles with the highest and lowest percentages of traffic violations. Of the top 10 automobiles with the most violations, three of them were made by Mercedes-Benz. On the opposite end of the scale, 6 of the 10 least ticketed cars were GM models. [More]

Are You Changing Your Car's Oil Too Frequently?

Are You Changing Your Car's Oil Too Frequently?

According to the consumer advice editor at Edmunds, if you bought a car in the last seven or eight years, you don’t have to change its oil every 3,000 miles. On these newer models, it’s fine to wait until 7,500 miles or more, although a Pennzoil employee tells the New York Times that you should stick with what your manual advises (which is still probably less frequent than every 3,000 miles). You can also check out this California State list of guidelines for different cars. [More]

GM Voids Warranty On Used Truck, Blames It On Chip Owner Didn't Know Was Installed

GM Voids Warranty On Used Truck, Blames It On Chip Owner Didn't Know Was Installed

Ken is facing a $13,000 repair bill on his 2007 Chevy 2500 diesel truck, because the full factory warranty the dealership assured him it had was voided by GM. The reason: GM says at some point in the past, someone put a chip in the truck that doesn’t match the info GM has, so they don’t have to service it. The problem for Ken is that the dealership didn’t check for this chip before it sold the truck to Ken, and Ken didn’t know about this loophole when he bought it. In fact, he says he bought it about a year and a half before GM implemented this rule. [More]

How Often Is Your Car Model Stolen?

How Often Is Your Car Model Stolen?

The Highway Loss Data Institute keeps track of insurance claims for stolen cars, and it’s just released a list of the highest and lowest insurance claims for auto theft for 2007-09 models. The winner is the Cadillac Escalade luxury SUV, followed by the Ford F-250 pickup–both of these vehicles have a relatively high claim frequency and high average loss payment per claim of $9,600-$11,000. On the other end, the Mini Cooper and Toyota Sienna 4WD are infrequently stolen and have average loss payments of around $2,000. [More]

Why Are Fewer Teens Driving These Days?

Why Are Fewer Teens Driving These Days?

Here’s some news that will please many of you who cringe when you see a cocky teenager behind the wheel of an automobile. A new report claims that not only are fewer teens driving their own cars, but that fewer teens are on the road in general. [More]

Enjoy The Ride: Vibrating Seat Could Enhance Driver Safety

Enjoy The Ride: Vibrating Seat Could Enhance Driver Safety

You’re driving along, happy as can be, rocking out to some Journey, when suddenly, you feel a vibration against your body. Feels kinda good but oh no, wait, that’s a signal that there’s a car approaching on your left side so watch out and don’t get in an accident. Sound enticing — er, interesting? You’re in luck! Engineers at Yale are working on just such an invention. [More]