(John Hanley)

Live The Dream: Buy Your Own Doomsday Bunker In Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland, northeast of Belfast, the country built a massive underground bunker big enough to hold 235 people. It was meant for the country’s elite to shelter themselves in the event of nuclear war. Its existence was only made public in 2007, and the government has decided to get rid of it. There’s a problem, though: it’s easy enough to sell government surplus filing cabinets or tanks, but what’s the market for 46,363 square feet of blastproof and windowless real estate? [More]

Tesla Sues Supplier Over Falcon-Wing Door Misrepresentations, Demands For Payment

Tesla Sues Supplier Over Falcon-Wing Door Misrepresentations, Demands For Payment

The super-cool, futuristic looking doors on Tesla’s Model X might be eye-catching, but they were apparently a source of consternation for the company and one of its suppliers, according to a new lawsuit.  [More]

(Frontline)

7 Things You Need To Know From Frontline’s Investigation On Supplements & Safety

They look like drugs, they’re regulated by the Food and Drug Administration, but Frontline‘s new investigation found that supplements are very, very different. [More]

Taxpayer Advocate Concerned About IRS Plans To Move More Support Online

Taxpayer Advocate Concerned About IRS Plans To Move More Support Online

It was just last week that we wrote about how this year will probably be better than last year for U.S. taxpayers with questions or problems. Yet looking forward to the next decade or so, changes in how the IRS provides support will mean leaving some Americans behind. [More]

Lumosity Ordered To Quit Claiming Their Games Make Users Smarter, Prevent Dementia

Lumosity Ordered To Quit Claiming Their Games Make Users Smarter, Prevent Dementia

Improving every day at a casual mobile or computer game might make you feel like you’ve accomplished something, but does it make you smarter? It’s possible, but if recent ads from Lumosity made you wonder how a company can legally claim that playing a simple game can help stave off Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, well, they can’t. As a result, Lumosity must pay $2 million to customers. There is also a court-ordered $50 million penalty involved, but that has been suspended because Lumosity doesn’t have the money to pay it. [More]

Musician Files $150M Lawsuit Against Spotify For Royalties

Musician Files $150M Lawsuit Against Spotify For Royalties

To make a song available on a streaming service like Spotify or Apple Music, the services negotiate with record labels and representatives of songwriters. David Lowery is a musician (best known for the bands Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven), a professor, and an activist for artists’ rights in the new music economy, and his latest effort is a class action lawsuit against Spotify for mechanical royalties. [More]

(Mike Mozart)

Cheerios Protein Has Slightly More Protein, More Sugar Than Regular Cheerios

If you follow current food trends, you know that Americans are losing interest in breakfast cereal, but can’t get enough protein. Cereal companies see those trends, and are ready to respond with new products to entice customers back to their aisle. For example, General Mills started a line called Cheerios Protein to supplement their classic Cheerios. The problem: while Cheerios Protein has more protein per serving, it also has a lot more sugar. [More]

(Erik H)

Lumber Liquidators Pleads Guilty To Selling Hardwood From Endangered Big Cat Habitats

Lumber Liquidators has officially pleaded guilty to violations of the Lacey Act, a law that bans illegally-harvested animal and plant products, including trees, from sale in the United States. It turns out that the offending hardwoods were illegally harvested because they were in forests in eastern Russia that are home to two species of endangered wild cats: the Amur leopard and the Siberian tiger. [More]

(Consumerist Dot Com)

Contractor Accepts $7,500 In Payments, Disappears

When you hire a contractor and they do a competent job, you should be able to just hire that contractor again without checking their background and starting the process over. Right? Not so fast, as one person who aspired to have new doors installed in his home learned the hard way. He hired back a contractor he had used in the past without checking any licenses, and paid about $7,500 for his mistake. [More]

Not an actual child's fruit cup, but tasty. (Steve R.)

Federal Program To Feed Poor Kids Fresh Fruit And Vegetables Is Actually Controversial

The federal Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program means that kids in high-poverty schools receive cups of fresh fruits and vegetables every day, starting kids on what program boosters hope will be a lifelong habit of thinking of fresh produce as valid and delicious snacks. Who could possibly object to that? Lobbyists for the frozen, canned, and dried fruit industries. [More]

No, You Shouldn’t Incorporate And Register Your Car Tax-Free In Montana

No, You Shouldn’t Incorporate And Register Your Car Tax-Free In Montana

Car ownership is fun and convenient, but paying sales tax, use tax, or personal property tax on your car is expensive and annoying. What if you could avoid that, and avoid annual car inspections, just by filling out a little bit of paperwork? That’s the premise of companies that offer to help you incorporate in Montana, have your corporation own the vehicle, and pay no taxes. [More]

Supplement-Maker Who Diluted Products With Other Powders Sentenced To 40 Months In Prison

Supplement-Maker Who Diluted Products With Other Powders Sentenced To 40 Months In Prison

When you buy a food product or a dietary supplement, you should be confident that the product’s ingredients are listed on the label, and that you’re getting what you paid for. Federal prosecutors say that one dietary supplement wholesaler in New Jersey spent four years selling products diluted with products like maltodextrin or rice flour, increasing profits but defrauding customers. The company’s owner now must forfeit $1 million in profits and has been sentenced to 40 months in prison and one year of supervised release. [More]

Waze Accused Of Stealing Map Data From Competing Traffic App

Waze Accused Of Stealing Map Data From Competing Traffic App

How do you catch someone who you think is stealing your map data? Just put locations on the map that don’t exist, and then look for those locations to show up on the alleged thief’s maps. That’s what traffic-alerting app PhantomAlert did when it believed that competitor Waze was stealing its location database. Now PhantomAlert is suing Waze, which has since been purchased by Google. [More]

Soft Drink Companies Fund Fitness Programs, Ungrateful Governments Campaign Against Soda Anyway

Soft Drink Companies Fund Fitness Programs, Ungrateful Governments Campaign Against Soda Anyway

Soft drink companies have an important message to get across to the public: their products can be part of a healthy lifestyle when used occasionally, and when you burn off that Mountain Dew with regular exercise. They’ve even been nice enough to fund fitness programs in many cities, and those ungrateful cities respond by proposing taxes and warning labels for their products. [More]

Fox News Anchor Sues Hasbro Over Toy Hamster With Her Name

Fox News Anchor Sues Hasbro Over Toy Hamster With Her Name

Harris Faulkner, an anchor on the Fox News cable network, is a human and has been on TV for decades. Yet the toy company Hasbro sells a tiny plastic hamster as part of its Littlest Pet Shop line which is named Harris Faulkner. How did the hamster get its name? Is it intended to insult or honor Ms. Faulkner, or just a very strange coincidence? She has sued the company for $5 million dollars, either way. [More]

Police Put Up Signs To Remind Motorists How Stop Signs Work

Police Put Up Signs To Remind Motorists How Stop Signs Work

Can a financial incentive make people change their driving habits? One police department in Pennsylvania is taking a slightly passive-aggressive approach to preventing accidents with signs that remind motorists how stop signs work. “Complete Stops: FREE,” the signs say. “Rolling Stops: $128.50. Your choice.” Police in neighboring towns are interested in the signs now, too. [More]

(Mike Matney)

Should The USPS Open Up Mailboxes To All Kinds Of Deliveries?

What are mailboxes? What are they used for, and what should they be used for? In the delivery biz now, companies are wondering what goes in our mailboxes, what a mailbox should be, and who should be allowed to have access to them. Now, only you and your mail carrier are legally allowed to use your mailbox. Should that change? Should package delivery companies have access? What about grocery deliveries? What about your dry cleaning? [More]

The U.S. Postal Service Is Open To Delivering Anything To Raise Cash

The U.S. Postal Service Is Open To Delivering Anything To Raise Cash

Do you need something delivered? Perhaps a case of water, some booze, or maybe a box of fresh fish? Consider turning to the same people who bring you birthday cards and jury duty summonses: the U.S. Postal Service is now delivering groceries to customers in seven cities, and also doing same-day delivery in some markets of things you might not expect to see on a postal truck. [More]