GM Expects To Pay Upwards Of $600 Million To Victims Of Ignition Switch Defect

GM Expects To Pay Upwards Of $600 Million To Victims Of Ignition Switch Defect

Last month General Motors detailed its plan to compensate victims of crashes resulting from the long-ignored ignition defect, saying individual payouts could range anywhere from around $20,000 to the double-digit millions. Today, the car maker revealed how much it expects to pay in total when all this compensating is done. [More]

GM Admits Some Employees “Didn’t Do Their Jobs” Handling Ignition-Switch Defect

GM Admits Some Employees “Didn’t Do Their Jobs” Handling Ignition-Switch Defect

GM executives will be back in the hot seat on Capitol Hill tomorrow. This time, they’ll be getting a grilling from the Senate Commerce Committee about the ignition switch defect that killed at least 13 people and the decade it took to publicly identify the problem and issue a recall. [More]

Senators Introducing Bill Making It A Crime For Companies (Like GM) To Cover Up Dangerous Defects

Senators Introducing Bill Making It A Crime For Companies (Like GM) To Cover Up Dangerous Defects

GM has spent the year in trouble: their massive recall has come with a slew of investigations, fines, congressional hearings, and lawsuits. But the company has been able to claim incompetence and avoid other potential penalties. Now, two U.S. senators are introducing a bill that will make it much more difficult for the top brass at companies that don’t report lethal errors to plead stupid in the future. [More]

Send Us Your Questions For GM CEO Mary Barra

Send Us Your Questions For GM CEO Mary Barra

General Motors CEO Mary Barra has only been on the job since January, but she’s already had to deal with an historic number of recalls, investigations by Congress and federal regulators, and seemingly endless lawsuits. We’re sure that many of you have questions you’d love to ask her; now is your chance. [More]

Docs Show Current GM VP Aware Of Ignition Problem In 2005; Federal Grand Jury Probing Recall Delay

A May 2005 e-mail from GM's Doug Parks -- then chief engineer on the Chevy Cobalt and now a VP at the car maker -- shows that he was well aware of the problem almost a decade before these vehicles were recalled. He is not one of the 15 GM employees who have been fired over this debacle.

General Motors’ internal investigation claims that no top executives at the car company were aware of the defective ignition switch that has resulted in at least 13 deaths (and likely many more) and the recall of nearly millions of vehicles. But newly released documents from the Congressional investigation into the debacle indicate that one current GM Vice-President was made aware of the problem as early as 2005. [More]

Lawmakers Not Exactly Thrilled By GM CEO Mary Barra

Lawmakers Not Exactly Thrilled By GM CEO Mary Barra

A lot has happened since General Motors CEO Mary Barra first appeared before lawmakers looking into the massive GM ignition switch recall tied to at least 13 deaths. The company has admitted a culture of incompetence while denying a cover-up, recalled another 3 million vehicles, and faces concerns that the total death count may be significantly higher than 13. So this morning’s hearing before a Congressional subcommittee was less friendly than Barra’s previous visit. [More]

GM Recalls Another Half-Million Cars For Ignition Switch Problems, But Different Ones This Time

GM Recalls Another Half-Million Cars For Ignition Switch Problems, But Different Ones This Time

Stop us if you’ve heard this one before: General Motors has issued a recall of a half-million of its cars because if the driver’s knee hits the keys while they’re in the ignition, the key can pop out, causing the car to lose power and potentially crash. [More]

Victims Of Saturn Ion Crash Accuse GM Of Letting Driver Plead Guilty To Accident She Didn’t Cause

Victims Of Saturn Ion Crash Accuse GM Of Letting Driver Plead Guilty To Accident She Didn’t Cause

The driver of a Saturn Ion who pled guilty to criminally negligent homicide, and the family of her boyfriend who was killed in the 2004 crash, have sued General Motors in federal court, alleging the car maker knew of the ignition problem that caused the crash but sat and watched while the driver was prosecuted. [More]

GM Is Super Sorry It Sent Recall Notices To Families Of Crash Victims

GM Is Super Sorry It Sent Recall Notices To Families Of Crash Victims

By this point, most owners of recalled General Motors vehicles don’t need a notice from the car maker to know their ignition switches need work. One group of people who definitely don’t need reminding of this fact are the families of those who died in crashes tied to the ignition defect. [More]

Report: 74 Deaths May Be Tied To GM Ignition Defect

Report: 74 Deaths May Be Tied To GM Ignition Defect

While General Motors has admitted that an ignition switch defect in Chevy Cobalts, Saturn Ions and other vehicles has been tied to 13 deaths, others have indicated that the number could be significantly higher than that. A new report from Reuters claims to have found at least 74 fatalities that may be related to the defective switches. [More]

Suspended GM Engineer “Forgot” He Had Bad Ignition Switch Fixed In 2006

Suspended GM Engineer “Forgot” He Had Bad Ignition Switch Fixed In 2006

Last year, the General Motors engineer who quietly signed off on a fix to an ignition problem that has resulted in at least 13 deaths claimed in a deposition that he had no knowledge of making this incredibly important improvement. But after Congressional investigators have turned up all sorts of evidence showing that he did indeed give the okay for this fix, the engineer reportedly says he simply forgot about it. [More]

Another 2.4 Million GM Vehicles Recalled

Another 2.4 Million GM Vehicles Recalled

Because apparently every model of car made by General Motors in the last decade has something wrong with it, GM has announced another round of recalls. This time, it’s four separate recalls totaling 2.42 million vehicles in the U.S. [More]

New GM Ad: Our Cars Are No Longer “Grenade-Like” Death Traps

New GM Ad: Our Cars Are No Longer “Grenade-Like” Death Traps

In the midst of a reputation-damaging string of recalls now totaling more than 11 million vehicles, General Motors is in need of an image shake-up. But the carmaker may be getting a little too honest in a new TV commercial. [More]

Video: Here’s How Easy It Is To Turn Off (And How Hard It Is To Steer) A Recalled Chevy Cobalt

Video: Here’s How Easy It Is To Turn Off (And How Hard It Is To Steer) A Recalled Chevy Cobalt

Earlier today, General Motors was hit with a $35 million penalty for its decade-plus delay in recalling millions of vehicles with defective ignition switches that could be inadvertently turned off, leaving the car without power steering and braking and deactivating the air bags. GM has repeatedly stated that these cars are safe to drive because an accidentally turned-off vehicle could still be steered to safety. But is that true? [More]

GM To Pay $35 Million Fine For Botched Ignition Switch Recall

GM To Pay $35 Million Fine For Botched Ignition Switch Recall

GM will be paying a record-setting $35 million fine over its completely botched decade-long ignition-switch defect and subsequent recall, the Department of Transportation announced today. [More]

GM Asks Plaintiffs To Pretty Please Hold Off On Ignition-Related Lawsuits

GM Asks Plaintiffs To Pretty Please Hold Off On Ignition-Related Lawsuits

General Motors has already asked a federal bankruptcy court to put an end to the spate of recently filed lawsuits related to an ignition defect that has resulted in the deaths of at least 13 people, but the carmaker is now asking the plaintiffs in those suits to voluntarily back off. [More]

GM Confirms It’s Being Probed On Multiple Fronts Over Ignition Recall

GM Confirms It’s Being Probed On Multiple Fronts Over Ignition Recall

While there have been numerous reports of agencies poking their noses into General Motors’ long-delayed ignition-related recall tied to at least 13 deaths, today the car maker game some indication of just how many investigations it faces. [More]

GM Shipping Kits To Finally Repair Ignition Defect Responsible For 13 Deaths

GM Shipping Kits To Finally Repair Ignition Defect Responsible For 13 Deaths

Amid probes from legislators, regulators, lawyers and criminal investigators into how General Motors managed to get away with allowing more than a million vehicles to hit the road with defective ignition switches tied to at least 13 deaths, the car maker has finally begun shipping out kits to its dealerships so they can start fixing the problem. [More]