(Jason Knight)

Get What You Want: Find The Right Person, Ask Them In A Nice Way

Eric bought tickets for a special event at a theme park a month in advance. Well, more like 30 days. He purchased it for the wrong day, but figured a simple call to customer service would get him new tickets for the correct date. He was wrong. A complaint on their Facebook page didn’t help, either. What next? [More]

E-Mail To Top Execs Makes AT&T Realize, Oh Yeah, My Phone Is Defective

E-Mail To Top Execs Makes AT&T Realize, Oh Yeah, My Phone Is Defective

Reader L. needed help from AT&T. Local stores refused him a warranty repair on his Samsung Galaxy S4, saying that he had obviously dropped it and cracked the screen. He insists that he did not, and escalated, drafting a letter to a few top AT&T executives. Within a day, he had a response, a new phone, and an apology. [More]

(TimmyGUNZ)

How An EECB To DirecTV Gave Me A Glimpse Into An Alternate Reality

Eric was living in two different realities simultaneously. In one, he was a frustrated DirecTV customer who was trying to get new and modern equipment by using the regular customer service channels, and no one would help him. In the other timeline, he was a Consumerist reader who had fired off an Executive E-mail Carpet Bomb when DirecTV couldn’t get it together and had an installer right there in his house within only a few hours. [More]

(Chris Rief aka Spodie Odie)

Can’t Find Executives’ Names For An EECB? Use LinkedIn

Since we published our original guide to launching an executive e-mail carpet bomb in 2007, one thing has changed: social media has become a lot more ubiquitous for people who aren’t currently enrolled in college. Reader Tiana recently had the same problem over and over with an item that she bought at a regional jewelry chain, and got it resolved by contacting some higher-ups. It’s how she figured out who to write to that’s worth filing away in the consumer toolkit in your brain. [More]

Searching for a SimCity happy ending ain't easy.

Using The EECB Gets Me A SimCity Refund, But What About Everyone Else?

Consumerist reader Kevin was one of many SimCity gamers ticked off last week (likely plenty are still fuming this week), but unlike many of his fellow players, he was able to procure a refund for the deluxe digital edition. What in the what? “But EA doesn’t seem to be giving out refunds!” you might’ve just yelled at the screen. Kevin attributes his success to the executive email carpet bomb, or the EECB. [More]

Sprint Authorized Retailer Promises No Activation Fees, Guess What Happens Next

Sprint Authorized Retailer Promises No Activation Fees, Guess What Happens Next

Tom had a problem with Sprint: an authorized retailer had broken a promise and/or set up his phone upgrade incorrectly. He set out to remedy it by deploying an exquisitely crafted executive e-mail carpet bomb. Now, when you deploy an EECB, we recommend that you provide relevant details, but also that you open with a short executive summary so that the busy people you’re emailing (or their busy underlings) can get a quick idea of what you’re complaining about, and route it to the correct person instead of immediately trashing your missive.

If you spend a lot of time online, think of an executive summary as a “tl;dr” summary that you put first, instead of at the end. Combine that with a clear letter and spelling out his (quite reasonable) expectations, and it’s no wonder that Sprint whipped a response and a resolution to him within the hour. [More]

([F]oxymoron)

A Guide To Figuring Out Executives’ E-Mail Addresses

So you’ve exhausted all the standard customer service and complaint-resolution routes and decided it’s time to unleash your issue via an Executive E-mail Carpet Bomb. Only problem is, you can’t find any contact info for these executives. What to do? [More]

Samsung Shares E-Mail Address For Reaching Executive Customer Service

Samsung Shares E-Mail Address For Reaching Executive Customer Service

It seems like just 22 hours ago that Samsung USA was asking Consumerist to redact its CEO’s e-mail address from a reader’s comment. Since then, the electronics biggie has admitted that maybe that wasn’t such a great idea, and now the company has agreed to provide Consumerist readers with a new e-mail address that connects customers who have exhausted the usual customer service channels directly to Samsung’s executive customer service. [More]

Samsung USA CEO Y.K. Kim Doesn't Want You To Know His E-Mail Is 'First Two Initials, Last Name At SEA.Samsung.com'

Samsung USA CEO Y.K. Kim Doesn't Want You To Know His E-Mail Is 'First Two Initials, Last Name At SEA.Samsung.com'

UPDATE: Samsung USA has had second thoughts about its CEO’s e-mail address being such a huge secret. [More]

Water Company Wants Me To Pay $30 To Activate Service I Already Have

Water Company Wants Me To Pay $30 To Activate Service I Already Have

A few years back, after the death of her parents, Consumerist reader Jen took over the running of the house in which she’d grown up. Since then, she’s been paying the bills without problem. But now the water company wants her to pay $30 simply to change the name on the account. [More]

T-Mobile Customer Demands Refund For Two Years Of Too-Slow Data… And Gets It

T-Mobile Customer Demands Refund For Two Years Of Too-Slow Data… And Gets It

When Sam was having problems with his T-Mobile smartphone, he did what he thought he was supposed to do: call up support. The agent on the phone couldn’t restore his phone’s Internet connectivity, but they did try to upsell him on some new services. He’d rather have the services he was already paying for working, thanks. When he took the phone to a retail store for help, he learned the real cause of his problems: he’d been wandering around for two years with an old 2G SIM in his 4G phone. He thought that he should have the extra cost of a 4G data plan refunded to him, and T-Mobile acquiesced… but only after he launched an executive e-mail carpet bomb. [More]

EECB To Amazon's Jeff Bezos Results In A Very Happy Ending

EECB To Amazon's Jeff Bezos Results In A Very Happy Ending

The first step in resolving a customer service issue isn’t to email the CEO of a company, but if nothing else works, why not? Lia used Consumerist’s Executive Email Carpet Bomb listings to get in touch with Jeff Bezos of Amazon and lo and behold, success! [More]

Hurray! Consumerist Helps Reader Find Laptop Left On American Airlines Flight

Hurray! Consumerist Helps Reader Find Laptop Left On American Airlines Flight

While running the gauntlet of the daily grind, one can get caught up in everything that can go wrong for a consumer, which is why we downright love it when something goes right. And if we can help a tiny bit, that’s nice, too. Rachael writes that her friend lost his laptop on a recent flight, and she immediately thought of Consumerist. [More]

EECB To AT&T Succeeds Where Small Claims Court Fails

EECB To AT&T Succeeds Where Small Claims Court Fails

Consumerist reader Judy has three young daughters, all of whom have Samsung Impression phones, many of which have failed over the last year or so and needed to be replaced by AT&T. So when the holiday times rolled around, Judy wanted to upgrade her kids’ regular ol’, buggy cell phones with iPhone 4S smartphones. She’d hoped that AT&T would see the benefit in allowing her to upgrade early and get a head start on paying them more money. Alas, the Death Star did not see the wisdom in her way of thinking. [More]

EECB Scores Hit On T-Mobile, Saves Customer $400 Charge For Phone UPS Lost

EECB Scores Hit On T-Mobile, Saves Customer $400 Charge For Phone UPS Lost

When Jeffrey received his replacement smartphone from T-Mobile, he packed up his old one, used the enclosed prepaid UPS label, and dispatched it using a UPS drop box. From there, the phone disappeared. One customer service rep after another assured him that the lost phone situation would be resolved…and then a $300 charge for the phone appeared on his bill. It was time to escalate. It was time to use a powerful tool he learned about from this very site: the executive e-mail carpet bomb. [More]

E-Mail To Home Depot CEO Resolves Month-Old Problem In 12 Hours

E-Mail To Home Depot CEO Resolves Month-Old Problem In 12 Hours

Consumerist reader Jim was feeling a little frustrated with Home Depot. He’d ordered some parts online for his chainsaw, only to find that one of the two boxes was completely empty. This was just the beginning of a month of misleading assurances, conflicting instructions and overall dissatisfaction for Jim. That is, until he penned an e-mail to Home Depot’s CEO. [More]

EECB To T-Mobile Accomplishes What Hours Spent Talking To Customer Service Couldn't

EECB To T-Mobile Accomplishes What Hours Spent Talking To Customer Service Couldn't

Consumerist reader Rebecca had an issue with T-Mobile. A sales rep for the company had told her she could save around $14/month on her wireless bill by switching to a different rate plan. But when she received her next statement, Rebecca found that her bill had actually increased by more than $16. A quick call to T-Mobile customer service should be able to correct this — oh wait, no it won’t. [More]

Activating Google Voice On My New Verizon Account Somehow
Undoes Cancellation Of My Old T-Mobile Plan

Activating Google Voice On My New Verizon Account Somehow Undoes Cancellation Of My Old T-Mobile Plan

For several years, Consumerist reader Bryan and his wife were happy with their T-Mobile service, but after some recent dissatisfaction with service, they decided to jump ship to Verizon. Everything seemed to be go fine and dandy when Bryan called to cancel service — and then he got his final bill from T-Mobile. [More]