The Internet Was Invented To Reunite Children With Lost Stuffed Animals

The Internet Was Invented To Reunite Children With Lost Stuffed Animals

The invention of the Internet has created some jobs, rendered others obsolete, and changed all of our lives. It has also made things possible that we couldn’t imagine before an interconnected world. Like the little girl who lost her stuffed lion, but found him again…thanks to Twitter. [More]

Scheduling Promotional Tweets Ahead Is Convenient, Can Make You Look Like A Jerk

Scheduling Promotional Tweets Ahead Is Convenient, Can Make You Look Like A Jerk

Companies try to entertain customers and prospective customers on social media by talking about their products, mentioning news relevant to their brand, and posting funny pictures that they hope people will share, like, and retweet. Maybe they should rethink all of this, though, and only use their pages for important news releases and coupon codes. This week’s cautionary tale: food-ordering site Seamless. [More]

(raftery)

Let’s Hope Ticketmaster Exec Doesn’t Bring Extra Fees To Work With Him At Twitter

At least we can (hopefully) count on former Ticketmaster President Nathan Hubbard to eschew confusing CAPTCHAs at his new job as Twitter’s first head of commerce, but let’s all cross our fingers that he doesn’t bring Ticketmasterlike fees with him to work. Because those are the worst. Twitter has hired him in a push to allow users to shop within tweets on the social media site. [More]

Twitter Protects Global Economy, Introduces Two-Factor Authentication

Twitter Protects Global Economy, Introduces Two-Factor Authentication

After a number of high-profile and embarrassing Twitter feed hackings, the tweeps over at Twitter realized that they need to join every other online service that has moderate importance in users’ lives and implement two-factor authentication already. If it’s good enough for our bank accounts and our Gmail, it’s good enough for our joke-delivery service, right? [More]

(Tom Raftery)

Report: Twitter Working On Two-Step Verification In Wake Of AP Hack Attack

If Twitter needed a reason to start using a two-step security process to protect its users,  yesterday’s hack attack against the Associated Press’ Twitter account would be more than enough. One single fake tweet from the AP about an attack on the White House sent the Dow Industrial Average diving, and a new report today says Twitter is working on a solution so that kind of thing doesn’t happen in the future. [More]

(Stra8upSkills)

Pairing Condolences With A Marketing Pitch: How To Get Social Media Wrong After A Tragedy

There are many ways to be insincere, but a surefire method if you want to destroy any shred of goodwill toward others you’ve just expressed on social media? Follow it up with a pitch for your business. Unfortunately, as in past tragedies, some brands still don’t understand that when something like the bombings in Boston happen, it’s time to zip it up. [More]

(Barry)

Wendy’s Tells Customers To Tweet At Wrong Username Two Weeks Too Early

Barry got a flyer for a cool new social media promotion at Wendy’s. It looks fun and simple enough: just take a picture of your chicken sandwich and tweet it with a specific hashtag. He writes that what should be a simple enough promo became needlessly complicated because of two mistakes on the part of Wendy’s: they handed flyers out two weeks before the actual start date of the promotion, and directed people to the wrong Twitter account. You know, minor details. [More]

(coffeego)

Facebook Might Introduce Hashtags & Twitter Is Like, “Welcome To Five Years Ago”

If the rumors are true and Facebook starts using hashtags, Twitter might get a bit peeved. On one hand, it’s just another symbol sitting there on the keyboard, but on the other, it’s been pretty widely known as strictly Twitter territory. A new report says Facebook wants to get in on the hashtag action, which could elevate the already frosty relationship between the two social networks to ice cold. [More]

(afagen)

FTC Says Social Media Ads Have To Be Held To Same Rules As Traditional Ads

One of the important duties held by the Federal Trade Commission is making sure ads don’t mislead consumers. Yesterday the FTC set out clear rules for short-form ads on social media like Twitter and Facebook as well. Namely, they have to be held to the same basic requirement as other advertising — be upfront about what’s going on. [More]

A profusion of confusion.

No, McDonald’s Did Not Buy Burger King Because “The Whopper Flopped”

You can’t believe everything you read on Twitter, even if it’s on the official account of a company like say, Burger King. Proving that anything on the Internet can be futzed with, someone took over Burger King’s Twitter account yesterday and announced that the chain had been sold to McDonald’s because “the Whopper flopped.”  [More]

Of COURSE I'm 17, Vine!

Vine’s New Age Restriction Notice Ignores The Fact That Liars Can Also Click “OK”

As we noted before, Twitter’s new Vine app has a little bit of a porn problem. As in, it’s all too easy to find six-second pornographic videos, despite the company’s best efforts to make that content hard to find. The service got in some hot water a few days after it launched, when a hardcore porn video popped up on users’ home feeds, and since then it’s been scrambling to assure the public it’s clean, honest. [More]

(cobby17)

Not That You’d Regret Anything, But Unlike Email, You Can Unsend Twitter Direct Messages

It’s late, you’ve just gotten out of a vigorous, cocktail-fueled round of validation with your friends (“There’s nothing wrong with you, he’s just immature!”) and you’re feeling communicative. A few bleep blop taps of the phone later and you’ve just sent a direct message on Twitter to that guy you were sorta seeing saying things you instantly regret. All is not lost, however. [More]

Growing pains, ugh!

Twitter’s Vine Video App Isn’t Even A Week Old & Already It Has A Porn Problem

It’s just a baby app, but already Twitter’s video-sharing service Vine is coming under fire for having a bit of a hardcore pornography problem. Vine launched last Thursday, touting the ability to allow iPhone and iPod Touch users to take six second videos and then share them with others. As with any social media, sex is going to well, pop up. But putting a hardcore pornography video in users’ home feeds as an “editor’s pick,” well… that’s not good. [More]

(billadler)

Library Of Congress Amassing Billions Of Tweets For Researchers Wondering If You Liked That Movie

Unless you’ve set your Twitter account to private, every time you ponder the meaning of a vapid celebrity’s fame or tweet about how much you love your new Spanx, those missives are public. If you only have say, 47 followers those tweets might not seem very public, but hey, maybe the Library of Congress is reading anyway. [More]

(MBQ)

Instagram Breaking Images On Twitter Because It Wants You On Instagram, Not Twitter

Full disclosure: I like Instagram (Cats! Clouds! Feet!). I will often share photos I take on it on Twitter, but I rarely do on Facebook. Last night I noticed that several photos I’d tweeted out never made it onto Twitter at all, and then this morning came rumblings that Instagram photos on Twitter were showing up broken or cropped. Why? Instagram, which was recently acquired by Facebook, did that on purpose, the company says. [More]

Twitter Says It's Going To Start Aiming Ads At Users Based On Content Of Tweets

Twitter Says It's Going To Start Aiming Ads At Users Based On Content Of Tweets

As my astute colleague Laura had cause to mention today — if you’re using a free service without paying anything, you’re probably the product. Twitter, long the bastion of those averse to the marketing tactics already displayed on social media sites like Facebook, has announced it’s going to start taking users’ tweets and aiming ads at them based on the content. [More]

Converse, Twitter Customer Non-Service, And The Amazing Self-Destructing Sneakers

Converse, Twitter Customer Non-Service, And The Amazing Self-Destructing Sneakers

Maybe Tim is being irrational, but he was under the impression that if he spent $100 on a pair of shoes, he could depend on the soles to not fall apart inside of a year. Sure, he lives in New York City and puts a lot of miles on his shoes, but isn’t that the point of shoes? When his first pair of Converse by John Varvatos wore out, he bought another. He really liked the shoes, except for the pesky hole in the heel. When the second pair fell apart within six months too, he sought help from Converse. Apparently, Converse has never helped a customer with a complaint about the longevity of their shoes before, because they don’t seem to know how to deal with an unhappy customer. Or maybe their passing Tim around to different places and departments and ignoring his messages is their policy. [More]

Journalist’s Twitter Account Suspended For Sharing NBC Executive’s E-Mail Address

Journalist’s Twitter Account Suspended For Sharing NBC Executive’s E-Mail Address

As we mentioned on Saturday, NBC is taking a lot of heat in the social media sphere for its refusal to air marquee events like swimming or gymnastics until its prime time broadcasts. Now one UK journalist’s attempts to get some sort of response from NBC’s many, many, many Twitter pages has led to his Twitter account being suspended. [More]