How Switching To Cheaper Smartphone Plan For Deaf Customers Can Cost More

How Switching To Cheaper Smartphone Plan For Deaf Customers Can Cost More

Mobile phone carriers aren’t about to let the majority of smartphone customers give up their voice plans any time soon, no matter how few minutes you use every month. Jack’s girlfriend doesn’t have much use for voice minutes, though. She’s deaf. She actually talks on the phone rarely, and more often uses the data connection to type to people and make phone calls using a relay service. After a few months, she managed to find someone at Sprint willing to put her on a special plan for deaf customers that has no voice minutes, and even gave her that plan’s price going back two months. What she didn’t realize was that she would be billed twenty cents for every minute of voice calls she had made during those two months. [More]

NY Attorney General Files $300 Million Lawsuit Against Sprint

NY Attorney General Files $300 Million Lawsuit Against Sprint

Earlier today, the Attorney General for the state of New York accused the folks at Sprint-Nextel Corp of deliberately failing to collect more than $100 million in sales tax from customers — and now he wants the nation’s third-largest wireless provider to pay up. [More]

Sprint Decides It Doesn't Want Me As A Customer, Cuts Phone Off With No Warning

Sprint Decides It Doesn't Want Me As A Customer, Cuts Phone Off With No Warning

Consumerist reader G. has been a Sprint customer for six years, and has always paid his bills on time, and referred friends and family to their service. But that special relationship apparently wasn’t two-sided, as Sprint decided to cut off G.’s service one day with absolutely no warning, other than a line buried in his Terms of Service. [More]

Here's How Much Law Enforcement Has To Pay To Snoop On Your Calls

Here's How Much Law Enforcement Has To Pay To Snoop On Your Calls

Back in December, a U.S. Appeals court gave the thumbs-up to telecommunications companies working with the National Security Agency to monitor phones and email. Phone companies are also apparently totally cool with selling access to your phone activities to other law enforcement agencies willing to fork over pre-set prices. [More]

(Will Middelaer)

Sprint Insists I Owe Them $800 For Nonexistent Account

Samit isn’t a Sprint customer. He doesn’t have a Sprint phone or service. He doesn’t have a customer number. But somehow he owes Sprint $800 for service that he neither signed up for nor received. See, he had tried to become a customer. After starting the process of setting up Sprint service, someone took down his social security and credit card numbers, then wandered off. Samit received an iPhone that he never asked for, sent it back, and somehow has racked up $800 in phantom phone bills. [More]

Sprint Gives Me An Early Upgrade, In Spite Of Employees' Worst Efforts

Sprint Gives Me An Early Upgrade, In Spite Of Employees' Worst Efforts

Most “happy ending” stories we post involve customer service reps who do a little more than what the script provides. But this story is slightly different, in that the customer still managed to get good customer service, even while dealing with people who didn’t seem to know what was going on. [More]

Which Worst Company Contenders Force Customers Into Mandatory Arbitration?

Which Worst Company Contenders Force Customers Into Mandatory Arbitration?

As we sifted through the mountain of nominations for this year’s Worst Company In America tournament, we noticed a trend of readers who cited companies’ mandatory binding arbitration clauses as a reason for nominating. And while it’s businesses like AT&T and Sony that have made all the headlines for effectively banning class action lawsuits, there are a lot of other WCIA contenders who are forcing customers into signing away their rights. [More]

Worst Company In America Round One: Facebook Vs. Sprint

Worst Company In America Round One: Facebook Vs. Sprint

Here we have a Round One battle between two opponents with peculiar predicaments. In one corner is a website that continually tries to invade your privacy but to which everyone on the planet seems to belong. And in the other corner is the phone company that claims to offer truly unlimited data plans, but which can’t seem to get new customers. [More]

Here It Is, Your Lineup For Worst Company In America 2012!

Here It Is, Your Lineup For Worst Company In America 2012!

Welcome to Consumerist’s 7th Annual Worst Company In America tournament, where the businesses you nominated face off for a title that none of them will publicly admit to wanting — but which all of them try their hardest to earn. So it’s time to fill in the brackets and start another office pool. That is, unless you work at one of the 32 companies competing in the tournament. [More]

Sprint Makes Good After Public Flogging, Offers Retroactively Bundled Minutes

Sprint Makes Good After Public Flogging, Offers Retroactively Bundled Minutes

Remember Sarah? She wrote to Consumerist after she went over on her minutes with Sprint after a death in the family, and was told she’d have to pay $100 as a result. If she had called customer service before she got her bill, however, she could’ve avoided such fees. We’re happy to report Sprint has agreed to help her out. [More]

When You Pay Google For A Service, Don't Expect Any Actual Help

When You Pay Google For A Service, Don't Expect Any Actual Help

What Justin wanted to do is pretty simple. He wanted to take his Google Voice number and port it to his new Sprint phone. This is a thing that you can do with Google Voice, if you pay. But as early purchasers of the Nexus One and other people who have issues with Google have learned, Google will happily accept your money, but doesn’t like to deal with actual icky customers. Their default customer support option–posting on a forum and hoping someone with power notices–isn’t cutting it for Justin anymore, since he’s having problems with text messages on his ported number. [More]

Sprint: You Have To Call About Your Bill Before You Know You Need To Call About Your Bill

Sarah had a rough month, after suffering a death in the family. She says as a result of that sad distraction, she went over 300 minutes on her Sprint plan minutes, and was then charged 45 cents per each of those minutes. Of course, when your bill is $100 more than usual, you’re going to see if you can bring it down. [More]

6 Updated Confessions From A Current Sprint Sales Rep

It’s been several years since we received some good insider confessions from anyone at Sprint. So in the interest of keeping things up-to-date, a current employee of the wireless provider reached out to Consumerist to see if that original advice still holds true. [More]

Sprint Pockets My Money And Thanks Me For Generously "Donating" My iPhone 4S

Sprint Pockets My Money And Thanks Me For Generously "Donating" My iPhone 4S

Caitlyn was just trying to return her Sprint iPhone 4S, and somehow she ended up with no phone and $400 lighter in the wallet, while Sprint thanked her for her “donation.” Is that what the kids are calling “taking a phone and not refunding your money” these days? [More]

HTC: We Can't Make Better Phones If We're Always Fixing Yours

HTC: We Can't Make Better Phones If We're Always Fixing Yours

William has tried everything to get a working HTC smartphone: he’s e-mailed executives and he’s visited his local Sprint store for help. The company replaced his broken Evo Shift with a Design. Yay! …except that on the new phone, no one can hear him. HTC won’t send a replacement phone. Not because he’s not entitled to one, but because William tried had swapped in a battery from his old phone when the replacement had shipped with a bad one. [More]

Consumerist Reader Resolves Sprint iPhone 4S Issue After Almost Two Months

Consumerist Reader Resolves Sprint iPhone 4S Issue After Almost Two Months

Readers know that we are huge fans of happy resolutions here at Consumerist, so even if it takes two posts and almost as many months, we are pleased to hand out props where they are due. David’s trials and tribulations involving a Sprint iPhone 4S with slow data speeds was first posted on this very site on Oct. 31. And now, he reports, all’s well that ends well. [More]

Think Your Mobile Payments Are Protected? Depends On Your Carrier

Think Your Mobile Payments Are Protected? Depends On Your Carrier

Just about any new cellphone or tablet allows the user to make digital purchases that are subsequently charged to their wireless account. And while the four major wireless providers — AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, and T-Mobile — claim to provide ample protections for customers, our pals at Consumers Union have found that users may not be getting fewer protections than they would for purchases made using a credit or debit card. [More]

AT&T Once Again Brings Up The Rear In Consumer Reports' Cellphone Satisfaction Survey

AT&T Once Again Brings Up The Rear In Consumer Reports' Cellphone Satisfaction Survey

For the second year in a row, AT&T’s wireless service finds itself at the bottom of the ratings in a customer satisfaction survey done by our cohorts at Consumer Reports. [More]