(WI-LO)

CFPB: Credit-Reporting Firms Often Ignore Consumers’ Evidence In Report Disputes

If you’re included in the one in five consumers who obtain an annual credit report, perhaps you’ve noticed an error in your report and have tried to get that fixed. But the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says that could be an exercise in futility, as the three major credit-reporting firms might not be paying attention to any information you submit to make your case. [More]

Woman Spends 6 Years Trying To Convince Credit Bureaus She's Not Dead

Woman Spends 6 Years Trying To Convince Credit Bureaus She's Not Dead

In 2004, a hospital staffer accidentally checked off “deceased” on a heart surgery patient’s discharge papers. That one little tick mark on one document resulted in years of headaches for that woman, as she has attempted time and again to prove to the three credit bureaus that she is not a zombie. [More]

Cordray: Credit Bureaus Are A "Murky Unknown" To Consumers

Last week, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced it was drafting new regulations that would allow for the oversight of the largest credit reporting bureaus and debt collection companies. The reason, explains CFPB head Richard Cordray is that many consumers are in the dark about these businesses and feel somewhat helpless when it comes to dealing with them. [More]

The Ins & Outs Of Getting And Using Your Free Credit Report

The Ins & Outs Of Getting And Using Your Free Credit Report

Regular readers of Consumerist know full well that those websites like FreeCreditReport.com and FreeScore.com (you’ll forgive us for not actually linking to them) are not exactly what their names might have you believe. But there are new consumers born every day, so it doesn’t hurt clarifying once again that there is only one place to score your credit reports with no strings attached. [More]

Does A Bad Credit Score Mean You'll Be Bad At Your Job?

Does A Bad Credit Score Mean You'll Be Bad At Your Job?

A growing number of employers are running credit checks on potential hires before making a job offer. Unfortunately, there are a large number of people out there whose credit reports are still marred by the recent and ongoing economic troubles. So does it make sense to consider an applicant’s credit history? [More]

Freeze Your Credit Report

Freeze Your Credit Report

One way to protect yourself from identity theft is to “freeze” your credit report. This means that no new lines of credit can be opened in your name because lenders are prevented from taking a look at your credit report. This stops identity thieves from opening credit cards under your name and going on spending sprees. It also means extra hassle for you when you want to legitimately open credit. There’s always a tradeoff between security and convenience. Here’s how to do it. [More]

5 Myths About Your Credit Score

5 Myths About Your Credit Score

How one’s credit score is computed is to most people a complete mystery, akin to figuring out a quarterback’s passer rating. Thus, there are numerous myths and half-truths that have attached themselves to credit scores, some of them having at least a partial basis in fact. [More]

How Long Should Paid-Off Medical Debt Be Part Of Your Credit Report?

How Long Should Paid-Off Medical Debt Be Part Of Your Credit Report?

Right now, any medical debt that gets sent to a collections agency can remain on your credit report for up to seven years, even after it’s been paid off. This ding on your credit score can be the difference between qualifying for a loan or being denied. That’s why the House Committee on Financial Services is looking at a bill that would erase some paid medical debts from folks’ credit reports. [More]

Do VIP's Get Privileged Treatment From Credit Bureaus?

Do VIP's Get Privileged Treatment From Credit Bureaus?

NYT reports that the three major credit bureaus each keep a special VIP list of important people who are given preferential treatment when fixing their credit reports. The list has the names of celebrities, politicians, judges and others on it. When they have errors on their reports, they are fixed by employees who work in America, and fixed swiftly. The rest of us get our requests shunted overseas to be dealt with in a cursory manner. [More]

How To Dispute Credit Report Errors

How To Dispute Credit Report Errors

Over 80% of credit reports have errors on them, errors which could be lowering your credit score and keeping you from getting credit or paying more for it than you should. Here’s how to fix them: [More]

"Help, Equifax Won't Give Me My Credit Report!"

"Help, Equifax Won't Give Me My Credit Report!"

A reader just had his credit limit lowered on a credit card due to some bad credit history that he says isn’t his. He’d like to see what’s going on with his credit report, but Equifax says he’ll have to pay for the privilege, because they have no record of any inquiries in the past 60 days. The reader asks, “Has this happened to anyone else, where a credit card company waited over 60 days to notify them of credit limit reductions? Also, does this violate the FCRA?” [More]

Do You Need Identity Theft Protection Against The Census?

Do You Need Identity Theft Protection Against The Census?

Several alert readers sent us this advertisement that ran on the front page of CNN.com today. Wait–is the census going to steal my identity? Is my name, race, and birthdate all someone needs to open a credit card in my name? No. You do not need identity theft protection because of the census. Equifax has just mashed up some good information about how to avoid census scams with a sales pitch for credit monitoring services. [More]

Get Ready To Disclose A Lot More Information When Applying For Credit

Get Ready To Disclose A Lot More Information When Applying For Credit

The downside to responsible lending is that the lenders will need more information about you, says the WSJ. [More]

36 Risk Factors Creditors Use To Deny You Credit

36 Risk Factors Creditors Use To Deny You Credit

Lenders can use the data from your credit report to deny you credit for any one of several reasons. If you are denied, you receive a letter identifying the credit reporting agency that provided the report, along with a risk factor reason code. Bargaineering published a list of the common risk factor codes that lenders use to deem you unworthy of credit. For all three reporting agencies, the cardinal sins are owing too much and failing to pay your bills. The list of codes, inside.

Experian Yanks FICO Score Away From Consumers

Experian Yanks FICO Score Away From Consumers

Soon consumers will only be able to see two out of the three credit scores lenders use to judge their credit worthiness. Out of nowhere, Experian announced it will no longer be selling its version of the FICO score through myFICO.com.

How Credit Bureaus Correct, Or Fail To Correct, Errors On Your Report

How Credit Bureaus Correct, Or Fail To Correct, Errors On Your Report

SmartMoney’s Anne Kadet looked into the process by which the three major credit bureaus—Experian, TransUnion, and Equifax—investigate and correct errors on credit reports. What she found was that the process is “almost entirely automated,” and that “many lenders respond by simply rereporting the erroneous data.” Here’s how it works, and your meager options when something goes wrong.

Debunking Five Credit Score Myths

Debunking Five Credit Score Myths

Your credit score. It’s amazing how one little score can have such an impact on our finances and how misunderstood that number can be. We’ll debunk five common myths about it right here, right now.

Check Your Credit History Year-Round, For Free

Check Your Credit History Year-Round, For Free

Statistics show that 80% of credit histories have at least one error. Most of them are minor and inconsequential but some can have an adverse effect on your credit score, often costing your thousands on mortgages and car loans. I believe credit bureaus were so lackadaisical about accuracy because it forced consumers to buy their credit reporting services. You wouldn’t know there’s an error unless you paid Equifax for a copy of your report. Fortunately, federal law now makes it possible for us to police our own records and force bureaus to correct them, all on their dime. Here’s how: