(Chris Metcalf)

IMAX Demands Website Retract Story That Has Virtually Nothing To Do With IMAX

The folks at IMAX need to learn when to take a compliment. When someone name-drops your brand as an aspirational standard, you should smile and appreciate the respect. What you shouldn’t do is demand that a news website retract an entire story just because someone mentions your brand. [More]

TV Viewers Want A La Carte Options; Don’t Really Care Very Much About ESPN

TV Viewers Want A La Carte Options; Don’t Really Care Very Much About ESPN

ESPN is by far the most expensive channel on any American’s basic cable lineup and its position as the sole place to watch certain high-profile content like Monday Night Football has given it a reputation as being essential. But a new report claims that if people had to pick and choose the stations they would want on a customized slate of cable channels, ESPN comes in far from the top. [More]

When Bob's Burgers runs on Hulu, it includes a pre-show bumper telling viewers when to watch the show live on TV. When you watch Bob's on Netflix, the network is not referenced at all.

Hulu Playing Nice With Broadcasters In Battle To Beat Netflix

For years, Hulu has lingered in the shadow of Netflix, and has had some trouble convincing consumers to pay $8/month for access to shows that still have commercials in them, when neither Netflix nor Amazon Prime insert ad breaks into their videos. But the service has recently begun playing nice with the very networks that have an ownership stake in the company in order to win access to better content. [More]

AT&T Faces $100M Fine Over “Unlimited” Data Plans

AT&T Faces $100M Fine Over “Unlimited” Data Plans

Last year, the Federal Trade Commission sued AT&T over its alleged failure to disclose to subscribers of “unlimited” data plans that their data might actually be throttled. The future of that case is in limbo right now, but today the Federal Communications Commission announced its intention to fine AT&T $100 million over its unlimited data plans. [More]

Florida Nursing Home To Pay $17M After Allegedly Using Medicare Money For Doctors’ Kickbacks

Florida Nursing Home To Pay $17M After Allegedly Using Medicare Money For Doctors’ Kickbacks

When a nursing home receives Medicare funds, it’s supposed to use that money for patient care, and it’s actually a felony offense under the Medicare and Medicaid Patient Protection Act to use that money to pay kickbacks to physicians for referring patients. In a record settlement for this sort of case, a the operator of a network of Florida nursing homes will pay $17 million to close the books on allegations it ran this sort of kickback scheme for seven years. [More]

Chicago is one of the markets where Walmart allegedly used its charitable Walmart Foundation to aid its urban expansion plans. (Photo: Eric Allix Rogers)

Walmart Accused Of Using Its Charitable Foundation To Build More Walmarts

There are more than 4,500 Walmart stores in the U.S., but the nation’s largest retailer continues to expand. The company, once associated with rural communities, has recently made pushes into urban markets. And a new complaint to the IRS accuses Walmart of wrongfully using its tax-exempt Walmart Foundation charity to get a foothold in those cities. [More]

Verizon Not Interested In Buying Dish

Verizon Not Interested In Buying Dish

With everyone else in the cable/Internet/wireless business gone merger-mad, the only thing that telecom titan Verizon has purchased recently is AOL for a few billion bucks. The company has long been suggested as a prime buyer for satellite TV service Dish, but a top Verizon executive says that’s just not happening. [More]

Senators Ask PayPal To Change Obnoxious RoboCall Clause In User Agreement

Senators Ask PayPal To Change Obnoxious RoboCall Clause In User Agreement

Two weeks ago, we told you how PayPal’s revised user agreement expanded the company’s already-intrusive existing permission to send pre-recorded robocalls and spam texts, and how the company gave users no apparent way to opt out. Then the FCC chimed in, telling the company that its terms appear to violate federal law. Now, several U.S. Senators are asking PayPal to rethink its terms before they go into effect on July 1. [More]

The Astros and Cardinals in a bench-clearing dispute in 2008 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (Photo: Paul Thompson)

Did The St. Louis Cardinals Hack Houston Astros’ Front Office? FBI Investigating

Major League Baseball is a huge business and much of a team’s financial success depends on its ability to win on the field. So the idea of one team possibly breaching another team’s network to get information on player personnel isn’t very different from two rival manufacturers trying to steal trade secrets. That’s why the FBI is investigating claims that the St. Louis Cardinals might have hacked into the computer network for the Houston Astros’ front office. [More]

Innocent Cox Customers Fighting To Prevent Personal Info From Being Turned Over In Piracy Lawsuit

Innocent Cox Customers Fighting To Prevent Personal Info From Being Turned Over In Piracy Lawsuit

Imagine you get a letter from your Internet service provider giving you some odd news: You’re not being accused of piracy, but there’s a court order demanding that the ISP hand over your information to a copyright holder who thinks you might be a pirate. That’s the case for several Cox customers who have been caught up in a lawsuit between the cable company and a mammoth music publisher. [More]

(Videodrome Discotheque)

FDA Says Artificial Trans-Fat No Longer Approved For Use In Food

Artificial trans fats are believed to promote coronary disease by increasing the amount of bad cholesterol in the blood while decreasing the levels of good cholesterol. While the use of partially hydrogenated oils — the largest dietary source of these trans fats — has dropped significantly in the last decade, there is still concern about their continued use and the impact it’s having on consumer health. Today, the FDA declared that these oils are no long “generally recognized as safe” [GRAS] for use in human food and is giving manufacturers three years to eliminate them from prepared food products. [More]

UPS Making It More Expensive For Retailers To Ship Your Large Purchases

UPS Making It More Expensive For Retailers To Ship Your Large Purchases

When online retailers like Amazon began making a big splash with free or discounted shipping, a lot of what customers bought were books, DVDs, video games — items that didn’t take up much room. But now people are buying TVs, refrigerators, grills, furniture, and other large items online, and UPS is apparently tired of giving retailers a discount on these shipments. [More]

PlayStation Vue Will Sell (Sort Of) A La Carte Pay-TV Channels;  Launches In L.A., San Francisco

PlayStation Vue Will Sell (Sort Of) A La Carte Pay-TV Channels; Launches In L.A., San Francisco

Sony’s PlayStation Vue streaming pay-TV service launched earlier this year in three markets and while it offers up competition for traditional cable and satellite providers, the bundles weren’t that different from what we’ve been getting for decades. Tonight, the company announced vague plans to offer more customizable pay-TV options through Vue starting later this year. [More]

LastPass Asks Users To Update Master Password After “Suspicious Activity”

LastPass Asks Users To Update Master Password After “Suspicious Activity”

LastPass is a service that manages your logins by remembering your passwords, so you can imagine the havoc that could be wreaked if someone were to hack the company’s database and get at all that juicy, luscious login info. In a new blog post, the company says it has no reason to believe that any passwords have been compromised, but some data may have been and LastPass is now prompting users to update their master passwords. [More]

(Christopher Hiester)

Former AIG CEO Wins Lawsuit Claiming Bailout Was Illegal, But Gets No Payout

Nearly four years ago, as America was still crawling out of the crater left by the collapse of the economy, a former CEO of AIG — a company whose name had become synonymous with the crash — sued the federal government over the bailout, alleging that the government had violated shareholders’ Fifth Amendment rights. Today, a court sided with wealthy investor Maurice “Hank” Greenberg, but he won’t be getting any damages because the company would have gone bankrupt without the bailout. [More]

(Alan Rappa)

Xbox One Getting A Lot More Useful With Backwards Compatability

When Microsoft and Sony announced their current slate of gaming consoles in 2013, neither manufacturer included backwards compatibility, meaning all your Xbox 360 and PS3 games still needed the old console to play those games. Today at E3, Microsoft finally announced that the Xbox One will include the ability to play previous-generation games on the current-gen console. [More]

(frankieleon)

Choosing The Wrong Prepaid Debit Card Can Cost You Up To $500/Year In Fees

While prepaid debit cards have long been criticized for having too many fees (and for being less than transparent about those fees), the impact of those fees will largely depend on how you use a particular prepaid card. Choosing one that’s ill-suited to your needs could cost you hundreds of dollars a year in fees that you didn’t need to spend. [More]

Court Allows Utah To Ban Price-Fixing Of Contact Lenses

Court Allows Utah To Ban Price-Fixing Of Contact Lenses

Contact lens companies have been working together to create price floors for their products, prohibiting retailers from offering competitive discounts and removing consumers’ ability to shop around for savings. Legislators in Utah recently passed a bill that would outlaw this practice but in May a federal appeals court temporarily blocked it from being enacted. But on Friday, the court vacated that injunction, allowing the new law to move forward. [More]