Pizza Hut Australia Is Not Handing Out Free Hamsters With Purchase

Pizza Hut Australia Is Not Handing Out Free Hamsters With Purchase

Pets aren’t prizes. That’s why goldfish games have been disappearing from carnival midways, and why people around the world were horrified when they saw that a Pizza Hut restaurant in Australia was offering a free small pet with the purchase of ten pizzas. The in-store placard featured a photo of a guinea pig, and it was not an appetizer. Pizza Hut says this was all a huge misunderstanding. [More]

(MeneerDijk)

Tainted Guinea Pig Street Meat Suspected Of Sending 81 To The Hospital

While you might see a guinea pig and think, “Oh, I used to have one of those as a pet and it made funny grunting sounds,” there are plenty of people who see a guinea pig and think, “Mmm, dinner.” Health officials in Minnesota say 81 of the latter kind of people were felled by tainted guinea pig meat and other food at a street fair this month in big case of suspected salmonella poisoning. [More]

(kimmoynes)

Beef Battle Continues With “Pink Slime” Defamation Lawsuit Headed Back To State Court

Remember that whole pink slime thing? Yeah, back before everyone in Europe was concerned about horsemeat in their burgers, America was freaking out over finely textured beef, dubbed “pink slime” by celebrity health advocates and news outlets. Beef Products Inc. sued ABC News and its parent company for defamation related to the scandal way back in September, and that lawsuit is still lumbering along with a move back to a state court from a federal one. Which is happy news for BPI, perhaps not so for the defendants. [More]

This whale is safe because he's a cartoon.(a lonewolf)

Company Realizes Selling Dog Treats Made Of Endangered Whales Maybe Isn’t Such A Great Idea

Over in Japan, dog owners apparently absolutely love their dogs and many have no qualms about spoiling the ever loving crap out of them with fancy food. But when environmentalists found out a Japanese pet food company was using meat from endangered North Atlantic fin whales in dog treats, the you-know-what hit the fan and has prompted the company to pull the controversial snacks from the market. [More]

(poopoorama)

Where’s The Beef From?: U.S. Regulators To Propose New Meat Label Requirements

Because not knowing where your food comes from means that your food could’ve come from an unsavory source (horsemeat, anyone?), the United States is supposed to propose new rules this week that would require any meat products to be labeled with the basics: Where an animal was born, what it was fed and where it was slaughtered. [More]

(Rennett Stowe)

A Rodent In Sheep’s Clothing? China Cracks Down On Crime Ring Selling Rat As Mutton

We thought our European brethren had it bad with the horsemeat brouhaha, but over in China, the meat scandal bar has been raised: Police have made 904 arrests as part of a crackdown on a crime ring that was allegedly selling rats and other small mammals as mutton. Cue intense shudder. [More]

(bluwmongoose)

It Ain’t Over Yet: Dutch Authorities Pull 50,000 Tons Of Beef Over Horsemeat Concerns

If it seemed like the horsemeat scandal was slowing down over yonder in Europe, that was probably a premature supposition. Dutch authorities in the Netherlands are pulling 50,000 tons of beef from the shelves of stores all across Europe over fears that it could possibly contain horsemeat. [More]

(justintrussell)

IKEA Reports A Pork Problem In Its Moose Lasagna And Wait… Moose Lasagna?

Ever since the horsemeat scandal started galloping across Europe, the global food industry has been on high alert for food masquerading as one species while actually containing another. Fresh off the hooves of previous food controversies as of late, IKEA has a problem with its moose lasagna. What’s that? Yes, moose lasagna. [More]

(Morton Fox)

A Pork Chop By Any Other Name: Pork & Beef Industries Rename 350 Cuts Of Meat

Today is a day for yours truly to talk about meat. But instead of horse or guinea pigs, let’s bring the discussion back around to more standard fare, beef and pork. In order to ramp up sales for grilling season and make shopping for meat a little easier, the pork and beef industries have banded together to give new names to 350 cuts of meat. [More]

(Kimaroo)

Perhaps You’re Not Too Keen On Horsemeat, But Hey, How About Guinea Pig For Dinner?

A warning to those with a soft spot for pets — you might not want to keep reading because one of America’s favorite furry friends collides with the culinary world in the post to follow. Some of us are a bit squirrelly when it comes to beloved beasts like horses ending up as food for people, so there might be a few noses turned up at the thought of guinea pig on the menu. As in, to eat. [More]

(rockman057)

U.S. To Ramp Up Species Testing Of Food Imports Because Eating Horse Is Gross

For anyone who’s been terrified, grossed out or otherwise disturbed by the horsemeat scare over yonder in Europe, take heart: After assuring U.S. consumers that we’re not facing the same tainted food scenario, federal regulators are pledging to ramp up “species testing” on imported meats just to be absolutely sure Mr. Ed doesn’t land on the dinner table. [More]

(bnilsen)

IKEA Bringing Meatballs Back To The Menu In Europe After Horsemeat Scare

Who’s hungry for some IKEA meatballs? They’re back on the menu in Europe. Before you get all squirrelly about it in the stomach region due to that horsemeat scare that caused the home goods store to stop selling them in Europe, relax.  The chain says its new approach to food is “farm to fork.” Ostensibly, horse farms are not included. [More]

(Karamellzucker)

You’re not alone if you find the idea of eating horse a bit yucky, but just count your lucky stars that no one (that we know of) is serving up narwhal, walrus, musk ox and more “North Pole” delicacies. The New York Times takes us on a journey to 1909, when the paper gave a dinner to honor Robert E. Peary on his supposed discovery of the North Pole. The menu leaves us skeptical of being able to eat lunch, and probably wasn’t that appetizing to those who had to eat it back then, either. [The New York Times]

(bluwmongoose)

Federal Legislation Would Ban Export Of Horses For Slaughter, Protect Public From “Toxic Meat”

While U.S. consumers have been sitting fairly pretty over here during Europe’s horsemeat scare, the hullabaloo has served to stir up some action stateside as well. New federal legislation is seeking to ban the export of American horses for slaughter, reinstate a ban on slaughtering them here and also protect the public from eating “toxic” horsemeat. [More]

(voidmunashii)

Another Day, Another Horsemeat Scare For IKEA: This Time It’s Hotdogs

We’ve all yelled in exasperation at a partly assembled piece of IKEA furniture while waving around wordless directions, but at least no one ever (that we know of) found horsemeat in a dresser. The retailer’s food isn’t so lucky: After pulling meatballs in Europe due to the horsemeat scare and almond cakes for coliform bacteria, the latest product to join the recalled product club is Russian hotdogs. Guess why? [More]

(The Consumerist)

IKEA Pulls Almond Cake From Sale In 23 Countries After Finding Bacteria

Another day, another food misadventure for IKEA: Fresh off the heels of the Swedish retailer’s horsemeat-in-the-meatballs snafu, the company has announced it’s pulling almond cake from its stores in 23 countries after some batches on the way to China were found to contain coliform bacteria. That’s a common bacteria in human an animal fecal matter. Yup, more poop in the news. [More]

(Lee James)

IKEA Enlists Marriott’s Help In Assembling European Budget Hotels Using Only An Allen Key

IKEA announced last year that it wanted to build a bunch of hotels across Europe, right around the time it unveiled plans for its own district in Hamburg, Germany. And now the company is one step closer to its dream  but it needs Marriott’s help. Ostensibly even it can’t decipher those wordless instructions sheets. [More]

Chipotle Is Sorry To Interrupt Its Regular Steak Programming With Conventionally Raised Beef

Truth-telling shouldn't be so remarkable, but that's the world we live in.

It might seem like a small thing, to alert your customers when a product you offer changes. But as we’ve seen with the horsemeat scandal over in Europe, knowing exactly what kind of food you’re eating is vitally important to consumers. After all, you’re the one deciding to spend your hard-earned cash so you should be in the loop. Consumerist reader Salman noticed this kind of transparency in action recently at his local Chicago Chipotle. [More]