31,600 Pounds Of Gluten-Free Chicken Nuggets Recalled For Staphylococcal Enterotoxin

31,600 Pounds Of Gluten-Free Chicken Nuggets Recalled For Staphylococcal Enterotoxin

Drop that nugget! The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a recall of 31,600 pounds of Bell & Evans gluten-free chicken nuggets that were shipped nationwide. Random testing in Colorado turned up contamination with Staphylococcal enterotoxin, and all nuggets in the batch have been recalled. [More]

Amazon launched Kindle Scout, a program that allows readers to chose which up-and-coming authors get published.

Amazon’s Kindle Scout Give Readers The Choice In Which Authors Gets Published – Kind Of

Despite its decidedly unfriendly-to-authors feud with a major publishing company, Amazon is touting a new program that provides an outlet for hopeful authors, while letting readers maybe, sort-of decide who’s worthy of being published. [More]

(Kominyetska)

T-Mobile CEO: Apple SIM That Should Let Users Switch Mobile Carriers Is Crippled By Mobile Carriers

Apple included a very consumer-friendly item in their new iPad Air 2: the Apple SIM. As designed, the Apple SIM lets iPad owners switch cellular carriers without going into phone stores or having to get any new parts. But in reality, mobile carriers are doing their best to prevent any actual real-world consumers from doing so. [More]

Microsoft Dropping Xbox One Price $50 In Advance Of Holiday Season

Microsoft Dropping Xbox One Price $50 In Advance Of Holiday Season

It’s been a year since Microsoft and Sony launched their latest game consoles and the makers of the Xbox One are making a push to get their product in more homes this holiday season by dropping the price through the end of the year. [More]

(zipsonic)

Why Did CVS & Rite-Aid Stop Taking Apple Pay?

After nearly a week of accepting payment via the recently launched Apple Pay system, both CVS and Rite-Aid suddenly stopped offering this option to shoppers over the weekend. And neither retailer is giving a reason why, though it appears to be part of a retail-industry effort to eventually roll out its own payment system. [More]

Costco Takes Unusual Stance That Retail Employees Should Have Thanksgiving Day Off

Costco Takes Unusual Stance That Retail Employees Should Have Thanksgiving Day Off

As the beginning of Black Friday and thus the holiday shopping season has crept backwards into the early hours of Thanksgiving, we at Consumerist have taken a cantankerous stance against these early openings. Even we can take heart, though: a few businesses have confirmed that they will not be opening on Thanksgiving Day, because they’d like employees to spend the holiday with their loved ones or something. [More]

(PaulBarwick)

Free Shipping Will Be More Expensive This Holiday Season

There’s no such thing as free shipping. What looks like free shipping from a shopper’s perspective is only subsidized shipping, and those subsidies come from shoppers. They could come in the form of higher prices, or higher spending thresholds to earn free shipping. This year, free shipping will cost you a little more. [More]

(John Kittelsrud)

Forget Everything You’ve Been Told: Buy Your Plane Tickets On Sunday

That sound you hear is yourself throwing every thought you had in your brain about buying plane tickets on a certain day out the window. As the window shatters, so can your mind break free from former apparent misconceptions regarding the best day to purchase air fares. It’s not the day you thought it was, it’s Sunday. [More]

Consumerist reader Michael noticed that his "22 oz." Arby's cup only holds 21 ounces of liquid. A quick look at the underside of the cup (see below) confirms that this cup can't possibly hold the amount of liquid advertised.

Is Arby’s Shortchanging Customers On Their Sodas?

There is no set-in-stone standard in the fast food industry for what constitutes a “small,” “medium,” or “large” drink, so sizes will inevitably vary from eatery to eatery. But if a company sells you a “22 ounce” soft drink, it best come in a container that can hold that amount of fluid. However, this doesn’t seem to be the case at Arby’s. [More]

(Patrick Fagan)

Citibank Raises Fees For Accounts, But Plans To Offer Free Credit Reports To Some Customers

Citibank is poised to become the second financial institution to provide customers with free credit scores each month. But that’s only if customers stick with the company after its latest fee hike. [More]

Michigan May Be Latest To Ban Direct Sales Of Teslas

Michigan May Be Latest To Ban Direct Sales Of Teslas

Because car dealerships don’t want to move beyond an era of gladhanding salesman upselling customers on unnecessary add-ons — and because they apparently want to give electric car company Tesla as much free advertising as possible — they are pushing for Michigan to enact legislation preventing carmakers from selling directly to consumers in the state. [More]

They're baaaaaack

Apple Stores To Stop Selling Fitbit Trackers, New Product Photos Leaked

If you’re one of the people who loved the Fitbit Force, but returned the fitness-tracking wristband when you suffered from contact dermatitis or when the product was recalled in the United States, good news. Photos have leaked of a product display for the Force’s rumored replacements, and they look very similar. However, we have bad news if you planned to buy that wristband at your local Apple Store. [More]

Whole Foods Introduces Produce Ranking System Based On Suppliers’ Farming Tactics

(Glyn Lowe Photoworks)

How do the fruits and vegetables you buy stack up against other produce? Are those flowers really the best you can get? Whole Foods is trying to answer some of those questions for customers with its new “responsibly grown” labeling system that ranks produce and plants at its stores, based on how suppliers farm those products. [More]

Frontline

9 Things You Need To Know From Frontline Investigation Of Antibiotics & Animals

Last night, PBS’ Frontline aired a report on the huge amount of antibiotics that farmers pump into animal feed and the effects that this practice has on the development and spread of antibiotic-resistant superbugs that kill thousands of Americans and make millions more sick every year. [More]

Amazon Opening Real-Life Stores In San Francisco, Sacramento

Amazon Opening Real-Life Stores In San Francisco, Sacramento

Amazon hasn’t officially confirmed that it is going to open a real-life store in New York City, though “people familiar with the plans” told the Wall Street Journal about the company’s planned , and there’s definitely something about to open in the space across the street from the Empire State Building. However, the company has confirmed that it’s opening two seasonal pop-up shops in San Francisco and Sacramento, California. [More]

(Adam Fagen)

New Vaccines May Have Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Under Control

We’ve been discussing porcine epidemic diarrhea on the site in the past, mostly in the context of it causing an increase in pork prices because millions of piglets have died. Good news for bacon-lovers and newborn piglets alike: there are two new vaccines conditionally approved to prevent PEDv, and another on the way. [More]

A Brief History Of Car Colors — And Why Are We So Boring Now?

stepahndw

You don’t know their names, but you see them everywhere: countless shades of reds, greens, blues, grays, tans, taupes, whites, off-whites, charcoals, blacks, gold and silver. Really what you’re seeing is Vanilla Shake, Tahitian Pearl and Torched Penny. Cars are everywhere, and so are the colors they’re cruising around in, their own distinctive skins. Paint is one of the most important design aspects parts of a car — the right paint job can mean the difference between luxury and sport utility, can turn Grandpa’s jalopy into a teen dream machine, and forever change a car from a vehicle you use to get around to a statement on free love and drugs. [More]

Do You Ever Shop Anywhere? Congratulations: Your Data Will Be Hacked

frankieleon

By the numbers alone, basically everyone in the country has been the victim of at least one data breach in the past year, if not more. 106 million Americans had their card data stolen from Target and Home Depot alone, to say nothing of the data breaches at Jimmy John’s, Dairy Queen, P.F. Chang’s, UPS, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, ACME, Shaw’s, Sally Beauty Supply, Goodwill, some Marriott hotels, Neiman Marcus, and Michael’s craft stores. And that isn’t even considering other breaches that were too small to make national headlines, or that simply haven’t been discovered yet. [More]