Another Christmas, Another Porn-Filled Nintendo DS Under The Tree

When you buy what is supposed to be a brand-new piece of electronics from the world’s largest retailer, it really shouldn’t come loaded with someone else’s content. And when the supposedly new device is a gift for your 8-year-old son, it certainly shouldn’t come pre-loaded with other people’s porn.

A father in Hampton, VA, tells WAVY-TV that he’d purchased a Nintendo DS at his local Walmart on Dec. 23 as a Christmas gift for his young son. But then the son opened his gift and began taking photos with it, and when they went to look at the images, they found the device already contained plenty of racy photos taken by someone else.

“It was a shocker because we had family here, and there were a lot of kids here,” says the dad. “The kids were the ones that discovered those pictures.”

Dad believes — and is probably correct — that these sexy-time images, all with early December date stamps, were taken by someone who had purchased the DS and returned it for a refund, and that Walmart re-shelved the device as new.

“Those things were not deleted from it, so it wasn’t a new product,” says the dad. “It was a used product.”

This isn’t the first time this has happened. Exactly a year ago, we brought you the story of a Colorado family whose Nintendo 3DS from GameStop came loaded with porn aplenty.

While it stinks that his kid got an unexpected eyeful, the Virginia dad may want to consider himself lucky that the box even contained the DS. As we’ve seen too many times, Walmart has a bad habit of re-shelving returned electronics without checking to see if the actual device is included in the return, like this Washington woman who paid for some Beats headphones at Walmart but only got a box full of tuna cans.

As we’ve said before, Walmart and other retailers need to stop automatically re-shelving returned items without putting them through a rigorous check. At the very least, they should be flagging these products in their system so that the original customer can be tracked down in cases like this.

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  1. Xenotaku says:

    So, this is something I’m fuzzy on. If they are advertising this as a NEW item, isn’t it fraud to be selling something someone returned? Especially in a case like this, where it wasn’t just a “oh, didn’t need it”, but where it’s clearly been used.