Westinghouse Digital Writes To Consumerist, Replaces Reader’s TV That Broke After 3 Weeks

Remember reader Mark, whose almost brand-spanking-new Westinghouse Digital TV failed only three weeks after he bought it? After we published his story, we heard from even more owners of failed Westinghouse Digital televisions. They were all very sad and frustrated. Now, Mark is no longer sad or frustrated, because he has a new replacement TV and contact information for some people at Westinghouse Digital who will actually answer the phone.

Someone from Westinghouse Digital reached out to us looking for Mark, and we passed along the information. That was a few weeks ago. How are things going now?

Mark dropped us a line:

Based on the response to Consumerist by Westinghouse’s senior customer service manager following the story post, I now have myself a brand new replacement TV (a different model, gee, I wonder why?). All things considered, it took about two weeks from first contact with Westinghouse to having the new unit delivered, including a bunch of vague (bordering on odd) e-mails from the aforementioned customer service manager and additional communication with a rather good CSR who handled the actual replacement.

The overall experience was still not nearly what was expressed by the warranty (namely, in-home repair versus me having to repack of the inoperable TV and send it to them within 3 days). Still, I’m glad I have a new TV, a new one-year warranty, and most importantly, contact information for all of the important people to get these situations handled in the future until this thing is out of warranty and I can rid myself of this company altogether. I would just sell it to someone, but that feels a bit like handing a helpless person a time-bomb; at least I am able to diffuse it now. ;)

So thanks again Consumerist for doing what you continually do for the struggling masses, it’s made a big difference!

Once upon a time, Westinghouse was a Pittsburgh-based company that made cool TVs that looked like this:

Now, Westinghouse Digital imports TVs to sell under a name that it leases from the smoldering remains of the company that once was Westinghouse.