Quicken Sends Junk Mail To Mangled Version Of My Name

John who?

It’s annoying enough that Quicken Loans sent an unwanted refinancing offer to reader John. We all get unwanted junk mail: what’s the big deal about that? The strange thing is that Quicken sent that letter to John Deddy, a person who does not, strictly speaking, exist.

John–who gave us permission to publish his actual name, which is John D. Eddy–wrote to Quicken:

Hi,

Somehow, my name got added to your mailing list as John Deddy.

That isn’t my name.

Also: I don’t really want to get mail from you.

If possible, can you tell me where you purchased the mailing address John Deddy, [redacted] from? I’d like to see about removing myself from that list as well.

If you didn’t purchase it, could you tell me how you did get it?

John Eddy.

The first person at Quicken to answer his e-mail had no idea.

Good Evening,

Thank you for writing. When I looked in both of our marketing programs and I am unable to pull up the information you supplied. If you have any further question please do not hesitate to give our Client Relations team a call at 800.863.4332. I hope you have a nice night.

Quicken Loans Client Relations
Phone: (800) 863-4332
Every client. Every time. No exceptions. No excuses.

At this point, John sent the whole exchange to Consumerist. Meanwhile, the wheels of actual fact-finding were turning behind the scenes at Quicken,

Good Afternooon Mr. Eddy,

Thank you for your email. We obtain our information from public records. When a home is refinanced or purchased, it is recorded with the county and made public to different lenders. I have removed that mailing address from our marketing list. If you would have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to reach out to our Client Relations Team at (800)863-4332.

Have a good day,

[redacted]