Lenovo Reads Consumerist, Lets Customer Buy Laptop

A couple of weeks ago, we shared the story of Devotee, who tried to buy a computer directly from Lenovo’s site, only to have the order canceled out from under him with no explanation why. You may remember reading this story, and so did Lenovo employees. They wondered what happened, too, and reached out to Consumerist to help Devotee and figure out why they weren’t able to sell him anything and what went wrong.

Devotee explains what happened next:

After my issue was posted by the Consumerist, i was contacted by Lenovo’s Consumer Experience Manager, who put me in touch with their Sales Manager. In short they made sure i received an equivalent laptop at the same price.

Apparently, i originally purchased a pre-configured laptop, and they had run out of inventory – i fell through the crack, but my post and Consumerist’s reach, got Lenovo’s attention, and after apologizing, they diligently corrected the issue.

All in all i have to say that Lenovo handled this very well, and to my satisfaction

Well done, Lenovo! Let’s hope that the next customer this happens to is able to get an answer out of someone without having to go through Consumerist first.

Comments

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  1. CrazyEyed says:

    If it where Dell or Gateway, he probably would have received a response such as: “Tough Shit”

    Glad it worked out for the OP. It’s too bad you have to have your story broadcasted around the world in order to receive an answer to what appears to be a common issue. Running out of inventory happens. Tip-toeing around the inventory issue shouldn’t.

    • YouDidWhatNow? says:

      It was alread “tough shit” from Lenovo, until the article appeared on this website. Same would have been true for Dell, Gateway, et al.

    • Martha Gail says:

      Yeah, he should have never been able to order it if it was out of stock in the first place. Even if he was allowed to order it and it came up out of stock, he should have received an email asking if he wanted to wait for it to come back in stock or cancel. Customers shouldn’t be left in the dark like that.

    • metzb22 says:

      The same thing happened to me with a Dell laptop. You are correct, that was their response. I didn’t even get a rain check for advertised sale price.

  2. Schildkrote says:

    “Well done, Lenovo! Let’s hope that the next customer this happens to is ale to get an answer out of someone without having to go through Consumerist first. “

    Delicious ale!

    • Blueskylaw says:

      Since we’re talking about spelling – OP:

      Capitalize Your “i’s” Otherwise You’ll Look Weak and Unwise

      :)

    • raydee wandered off on a tangent and got lost says:

      You do realize why the articles have typos, right?

      Some of the staff are showing solidarity with those of us in the comments who have been begging for an “edit” button for ages. If we cannot edit or correct our posts… neither do they.

      ;)

      • chefboyardee says:

        this is the greatest thing i’ve ever heard. i’m going to go with this explanation so i stop getting really annoyed at the lack of editing on this site. thank you!

        • Schildkrote says:

          I liked the explanation I got awhile ago: they insert the many, many typographical, grammatical and factual errors on purpose so people will comment on them and boost comment and pageview counts.

          This explanation’s pretty good too, though!

      • minjche says:

        Forget typos, how about using the phrase “reach out” in place of “contact”?

        I put that in the same ilk as “utilize” in place of “use”.

        /(silly) pet peeves

  3. backbroken says:

    So, a company went out of its way to make a sale.

    Congratulations, I think.

  4. Vox Republica says:

    Try as it might, the heavy cloud of cigar smoke could not quiet the din of executive-level lamentations and caterwauling. From each suited node of panic ran forth terminology—overleveraged, stagnant, inefficient, Pleistocene—that contributed to the greater River Dread. At the head of this table sat a distinctly rotund gentleman, time-robbed of his hair and given spectacles for compensation. It was just as the River Dread was set to run over its banks when the sound of fist against mahogany silenced the deluge.

    “Thompson,” the older man half-whispered. “Your presentation, please.”

    With this, a slight man in both countenance and masculine wiles, stood from his chair, hands visibly shaking. He swallowed hard, partly to remind himself not to vomit in fear, and partly as his routine wind-up prior to speaking.

    “Sir… we have spent two months looking at the data, and we’ve come to the conclusion that we can improve our bottom line if we–“

    He slowly straightened his posture, as though coaxed by the stares of his equally doomed peers.

    “Sir, we need to start offering products in exchange for currency.”

    The table—both the furniture and its occupants—sat silent for a beat. Two beats. Three beats. Then, surely as the river was about to drown them all…

    The old man laughed.

    Lenovo would live to see another day.

    • scoosdad says:

      Bravo. Another masterpiece.

      The next chapter ought to be how they were told that they actually needed to keep the products they sell in stock.

    • 401k says:

      I feel like you’d be worth having a twitter account to follow. I hope you get paid for some of your writing because it is quite brilliant.

  5. daggio says:

    And what would have happened if Consumerist didn’t publish the story? Exactly…

    Consumerist failed to publish my story about a cancelled order which could have been seen by Lenovo who might have sold me a laptop…

    I guess the only way to resolve issues is to go to the media who then cherry picks stories to run.

  6. q`Tzal says:

    Note to all PR flacks at retail corporations: follow the Consumerist blog with simple keyword search string.
    Then proactively head off any issue as soon as it posts.
    Don’t shift the blame, pass the buck or lie: the internet remembers.

    Do this and you will build customer loyalty not seen since the 1950’s.

  7. q`Tzal says:

    Note to all PR flacks at retail corporations: follow the Consumerist blog with simple keyword search string.
    Then proactively head off any issue as soon as it posts.
    Don’t shift the blame, pass the buck or lie: the internet remembers.

    Do this and you will build customer loyalty not seen since the 1950’s.

  8. Anne Noise says:

    Lenovo also responded to me on Twitter, telling me their rep had followed up, which she had. It was an interesting touch, and served more for them to get a positive tweet out, but whatevs. Good on Lenovo.