Woman Accused Of Groping TSA Agent Claims Turnabout Is Fair Play

A woman accused of groping a female Transportation Security Administration agent is claiming that she was just showing the agent the kind of aggressive treatment she herself was subject to during a security screening. And she should know, she says –Â she’s a former TSA agent herself.

The 59-year-old Florida woman claims she was just sticking up for herself while going through airport security at Southwest Florida International Airport, reports the New York Daily News. She said an agent grabbed her breasts and crotch during a screening. While demonstrating what had happened, she was caught on camera.

The video shows the passenger putting down her bags and grabbing a TSA supervisor near the crotch area.

“She did not touch the supervisor as intrusively as she was touched,” her lawyer says.

Other agents say the woman was upset at being selected for an extra screening and asked to talk to a supervisor. Her lawyer says the incident was personal, because his client is a former TSA agent who believes the incident was a targeted assault, as the two women know each other.

“She’s obviously been through training and knew this lady,” said her lawyer. She was removed from the flight to Ohio, where she was reportedly traveling to attend her brother’s funeral, and is facing misdemeanor battery charges.

“The pat down was conducted correctly in accordance with our procedures,” the TSA said in a statement. “Violence against our officers, who work every day to keep the traveling public safe, is unacceptable.”

(Passenger) accused of groping TSA agent, Florida woman says just demonstrating the treatment she received [New York Daily News]

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  1. Blueskylaw says:

    So the airport TSA agent gropes the woman passenger and nothing happens, yet when the passenger gropes the TSA agent but in a less intrusive manner, she is charged with misdemeanor battery.

    ???

    • UniversalRemonster! says:

      I couldn’t respond fast enough, does this mean we can file charges against the TSA for criminal battery?

    • ZenListener says:

      And it turns into a violent assault.

    • Coffee says:

      Very curious about this as well…I can see how her behavior could get her booted from a flight, or even escorted away from the airport, as it’s not a criminal issue, but reading between the lines, if what this woman did is assault, then U.S. citizens who travel are required to voluntarily submit themselves to criminal assault by government employees.

      • Craige says:

        I can’t remember the name of the law, but basically it entitles you to break the law in the course of preventing a more horrendous crime. So while TSA screenings could be considered abuse, they’re justified by way of preventing plain-jackings and the potential deaths of hundreds or thousands of people.

        Not that I agree with the screening process in anyway.

        • RvLeshrac says:

          There is no law which “entitles you to break the law,” in any situation. Prosecution is at the discretion of the government, so it may not be in their best interest to charge you with manslaughter for killing the guy who was about to set fire to the orphanage – but the ONLY thing preventing them from doing that is public opinion.

          • OSAM says:

            “Stand your ground laws” permit people from assaulting/killing someone to protect another. I’m pretty sure assault with a deadly weapon and/or murder are crimes, but they’re permissible under certain circumstances.

            • longfeltwant says:

              You don’t quite get the subtlety of what is being said. Killing people isn’t a crime, but murder is. SYG laws redefine when a killing is a murder, but that is not the same as “allowing you to break a law”. There can be no law allowing you to break a law; instead, a law could carve out an exception to another law, making the actions legal in certain circumstances. It’s pretty much the opposite of what you said.

          • Craige says:

            It may not be a “law”, but here’s what I could find on it:

            http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Defence+of+necessity

            I’m sorry I can’t provide more information. I just remember hearing about this in law class in school (in Canada, for what it matters).

          • Bill610 says:

            Nope. If lethal force is the only way to prevent serious harm or death to someone else, then that would be acting in self-defense and not a criminal act. I’m not agreeing with the idea that there’s a “law that lets you break the law”; what I’m saying is that legitimate self-defense is not a criminal act.

    • crispyduck13 says:

      Police can arrest people, but if a regular joe shmoe goes around trying to arrest people or pull people over in a fake cop car then joe is arrested. TSA can “pat down” people in airports at security check points, but if random people started doing it it is assault, and rightly so. You can’t defend this. I do not think this lady should be jailed or anything, but then she is ex-TSA and this situation is more complex than “passenger gropes random TSA agent.”

      I now hate you forever for making me defend the TSA.

    • Applekid ┬──┬ ノ( ã‚œ-゜ノ) says:

      In the old days, they’d just pull a baggie of coke from their pocket and claim they found it on her person.

    • Jawaka says:

      As she should.

      Its the TSA job to search and frisk people, not hers.

      Would you also defend her pretending that she was a state trooper and trying to pull speeders over on the highway? Should she also be allowed to throw a police officer face first onto the ground and try to cuff them just to show them what it’s like?

      It shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone that they may be searched at the airport.

    • tooluser says:

      I can’t imagine what you are puzzled about. The Government and its agents reserve to themselves the sole right to inflict violence upon the people. It’s not a two-way street. She could just as easily have been shot to death by the local Marshall who is stationed nearby.

      If assaulted by the TSA, wait until you get home to submit a formal complaint, and send copies to your Senators and Congressman.

  2. Craige says:

    “The pat down was conducted correctly in accordance with our procedures,”

    Good to know. Groping is in “accordance with procedures”

  3. The Black Bird says:

    The TSA said in a statement. “Violence against our officers, who work every day to keep the traveling public safe, is unacceptable.”

    They went on to say that violence against the public, especially toward small children, the infirmed and the elderly is completely acceptable.

  4. phonebem says:

    Hi Pot, have you met Kettle?

  5. Gman says:

    Sigh…

    No matter how stupid the security theater is or annoying the people are who are employing its actions you should never take your frustrations or reactions out against the agents themselves. Always use the proper channels, public opinion or media.

    All what she did was get her in jail with no other real result.

    • The Cupcake Nazi says:

      Seems to me she invoked the media very effectively, in fact.

    • KFW says:

      Yes, as you protest the absurdity of modern life, please restrict yourself to the proper channels. Please do not cause a disturbance. Your cooperation is appreciated. — Big Brother.

      • Gman says:

        Thus the other two. There is a time and place for rebellion against authority. Being uncomfortable and groped in a line is not either. There are numerous other ways to go against “big Brother” than violence.

        Save that for the next time a future dystopian govt’ uses oppressive tactics. I’ll bring my crowbar.

        • HomerSimpson says:

          Yes yes, do not question authority. You’re just holding up the line for others who are more than happy to be felt up (may be the only affection some of them get in a given day)

    • kc2idf says:

      Yeah, how’s that workin’ for ya?

      Proper channels are not there to affect change; they are there to deflect change.

    • HomerSimpson says:

      Yes, you go and do that. I’m sure in a couple of years (or “whenever they get around to it”), they’ll “look into it”.

    • Jane_Gage says:

      The Rosa Parks of crotch grabbing.

      • dush says:

        Just think if the millions who are groped started casually groping back the TSA dude. Are they going to arrest and prosecute millions of people? I’d like to see the government try that.

    • FigNinja says:

      I actually feel bad for the TSA agents with the new searching techniques. I would be quite upset if I were told that I had to touch strangers so intimately in order to keep my job. It’s not like jobs are so easy to come by right now.

      I doubt your average rank and file TSA agent is some sort of perv getting off on groping the passengers.

  6. Costner says:

    If you want to protest the actions and methods of the TSA, and if you honestly believe they are “wrong” (illegal, unethical, immoral, or just hurtful to your sensibilities) then I’m guessing groping a TSA officer or employee is probably not the way to handle it.

    Two wrongs don’t make a right.

    • Blueskylaw says:

      But four rights make a circle.

    • FredKlein says:

      Two wrongs don’t make a right.

      They don’t necessarily, but they can.

      If I’m playing poker with someone, the cards are shuffled, thus neither of us knows what card is next to be dealt. This is the way it should be- neither of us has an advantage over the other. This is ‘right’.

      If my opponent marks the cards, this is a ‘wrong’. He now has an advantage over me.

      If I mark the cards, too (a second ‘wrong’), we now both know what the next card will be, thus neither of us has an advantage over the other- which is ‘right’.

      Thus, two wrongs made a Right.

      tl;dr- If you cheat, it’s wrong. But if you cheat a cheater, the wrongs effectively cancel out, and the game is fair (‘right’) again.

  7. Craige says:

    I would have figured that a TSA agent patting down someone they know personally would be a conflict of interests, which should call for another agent to screen said person.

  8. TheMansfieldMauler says:

    That sounds like the first couple of minutes of a porn flick.

    “Oh yeah, well how do you like it when I do THIS?”
    “Oooooooh yeeeeeah.”

  9. sufreak says:

    While I despise the TSA, I can’t fully support this woman. Air travel comes with the current unfortunate consequence of getting groped by the TSA. Just because they are doing it (poorly) as part of their job does not give citizens the right to do it to them.

    If you disagree, you use other venues. Assaulting a person doesn’t make you right. It makes everyone wrong and the situation doesn’t improve.

    • Bionic Data Drop says:

      I fully support the woman in the story. The TSA should not be touching someone in a way that would be considered battery if done to them. Even police officers should not touch someone that way unless they have reasonable suspicion that the person committed a crime. Just because you need to fly somewhere doesn’t mean your body becomes the TSA’s playground.

      But hey, modern America is always willing to sacrifice freedom for security.

      • incident_man says:

        “But hey, modern America is always willing to sacrifice freedom for security.”

        And end up getting neither one in the process…………..

    • homehome says:

      Is it really that bad, because I’ve gone through the airport at least 8 times since january and they check me, it’s very inconveinent and quick. Maybe they grab and feel up other ppl, but I’ve never experienced what ppl are describing here. No one has ever grabbed my junk or any place that was uncomfortable to me.

    • We Have a Piper Down says:

      Spoken like a true sheep. Nothing ever changes without a few bumps and bruises, unfortunately. But go ahead and keep writing letters. I’m sure they all get read and taken into consideration.

    • HomerSimpson says:

      So when it comes to the point where they shove a probe up your ass will you be ok with that too? I mean gotta think of the chillllllldren…

  10. iesika says:

    I know it was a terrible way to make her grievances known, and that nothing came out of it but a criminal case against the woman in question. I know that her reaction was impulsive, and also that there’s probably more to this story than we’re hearing, since they women knew each other.

    But I fly frequently, and this brightened my day. :) Hopefully when I’m giggling in the security line on Saturday, no one will construe it as glee over explosives in my mini-shampoo bottle.

  11. framitz says:

    Leave the lady alone TSA gropers.

    • Coleoptera Girl says:

      I feel like we now need a spoof the the “leave Britney alone” guy, this time have it “leave the TSA alone”…

  12. VintageLydia says:

    Off topic: Do any of you think someone would get into trouble going through security in a bikini? I’m thinking stuffing a dress in the carry-on and once pass security, putting it on so one wouldn’t be kicked off the flight for daring to bare a bit of skin.

    • Craige says:

      I have a feeling you’d be detained as suspicious if you ran into the wrong TSA agent.

    • TheGhostshark says:

      inb4 someone asks for pics before they can decide

    • scoutermac says:

      This already happened once. The woman was detained and missed her flight.

      I could not find the link I was looking for but I did find this

      http://www.examiner.com/article/video-woman-strips-to-underwear-at-seattle-airport-to-protest-against-tsa

    • Coleoptera Girl says:

      Some people have made it through nearly naked, but others haven’t. If you end up selected for a grope, they will tell you to put your clothes on so that they can grope you. Also, make sure the local laws won’t say you’re indecently exposed.

      • VintageLydia says:

        I figured it would depend on the agent. I’d probably never try it but it’s a thought :P I wonder if a one piece bathing suit would make a difference, too.

        I had heard wearing dresses and skirts helps prevent TSA people from coming quite so close to the crouch area. They tend to err on the side of caution since they can tell as easily how far up your legs go. I may try that if I run into this problem (I refuse to go through the pornoscanners for about a million different reasons but so far ive only had to do the normal metal detector thing.)

  13. ShreeThunderbird says:

    If I read this correctly the two individuals involved already knew each other. Could there have been other issues at play on both sides?

  14. 2 Replies says:

    “The pat down was conducted correctly in accordance with our procedures,” the TSA said in a statement. “Violence against our officers, who work every day to keep the traveling public safe, is unacceptable.”

    Bullshit.
    The fact that “the pat down was conducted correctly in accordance with our procedures,” is what is UNACCEPTABLE.

  15. longfeltwant says:

    It seems crass to say that violence against officers is unacceptable, but greater violence against passengers is required. How about no violence at all?

    • StarKillerX says:

      You have that option, the method of achieving it is simple, don’t fly.

      I realize that’s not as dramatic and grabbing the TSA agent, or striping naked in the line, but it’s been known to work.

      • Coleoptera Girl says:

        What if someone has family in Hawaii? Such people are being denied movement within the USA if they don’t want to risk being groped or scanned.

      • RvLeshrac says:

        Yes, this. When people stop flying, things will change, and not a moment before.

      • longfeltwant says:

        That’s cute, but I reject the suggestion that people should have to shun modern culture in order to enjoy modern culture. That is a way for weak thinkers to try to say something insightful, when really they have said nothing at all.

        “Don’t like being oppressed by the government? Kill yourself! Then you aren’t oppressed anymore!”

        It’s just not a meaningful argument. It’s nonsense.

      • DJ Charlie says:

        Sorry, no. If people stop flying the TSA will move to phase 2. Checkpoints at every state line. You’ll get groped anyway.

        Actually, come to think of it, why haven’t they started putting up checkpoints at state lines yet? It’s the next logical step for them.

      • Mark702 says:

        And when the TSA comes to sports stadiums, Federal buildings, public schools, malls, post offices, etc. You can “choose” to not participate by avoiding those too. What happens then? Just don’t go outside or to the stores if you want to avoid being groped and sexually assaulted?

  16. 2 Replies says:

    Two wrongs don’t make a right.
    TSA was the first offender.

  17. Applekid ┬──┬ ノ( ゜-゜ノ) says:

    So, you might say, it was a little…

    … tit for tat?

  18. thenutman69321 says:

    “The pat down was conducted correctly in accordance with our procedures,” the TSA said in a statement. “Violence against our officers, who work every day to keep the traveling public safe, is unacceptable.””

    Quoted for being the most obvious hypocrisy in the world. They do it and it’s all fine and dandy even though we all know it doesn’t keep us any safer and is nothing but security theater, she does the same damn thing and it’s violence. Arrest every god damn TSA agent.

  19. Extended-Warranty says:

    This woman is an idiot. The people defending her are idiots as well.

    You don’t have to be a supporter of the TSA to know that grabbing the officers vagina accomplished nothing. Suddenly it is ok to do whatever you want to justify something you feel is wrong? Please fine her for this behavior.

    • Coleoptera Girl says:

      Wow! She grabbed her vagina? I don’t even see mention of labia… where did you get that? Vagina-grabbing would be straight up rape, not just assault.

      Neither woman should have been touched as they were. The TSA says that the first grope, of the traveler, was OK but the second wasn’t. I think what she did is better than if she didn’t because it better highlights the hypocrisy of the TSA. She’s an ex-TSA employee for crying out loud… I think she knows if a grope was properly conducted or not.

      • Extended-Warranty says:

        Just imagine if a male had groped a female TSA officer…

        • Coleoptera Girl says:

          If gender was the only thing changed… well, then even more people would question the caliber of the people the TSA chooses to employ. Unfortunately, a lot of people would be screaming “rape,” which it still would not have been. I wouldn’t feel any differently about it.

          It’s interesting, though, that footage of the passenger’s grope of the TSA screener is available but there is no mention of video of the initial grope of the passenger.

    • Awesome McAwesomeness says:

      To grab her vagina, she would have had to put her hand up inside the woman’s pants. I think what you mean is she grabbed her vulva. The vagina is the actual canal that a penis gets inserted to and a baby comes out of. It is not the outer area. The out area is the labia majora and minora and the mons pubis. The entire outside package is the vulva.

  20. incident_man says:

    I simply despise the idea of flying anywhere, because of these TSA “enhanced security” procedures.

    1. Because it’s an invasion of my privacy, bordering on assault.
    2. Because I believe the actual effectiveness in stopping airline hijackings is dubious, and
    3. The last thing I need is a lovelorn TSA agent following me around the airport afterwards.

  21. Atherton says:

    Were the words “honka honka” employed by the accused at any time during the alleged assault?

  22. Sad Sam says:

    What happened to those public advocates that were supposed to be available. I get groped 9 times out of 10 when I fly, so I’m overly familiar with the process.

    My biggest grip is the fact that I have to be groped at all. Followed by the regular delay in finding a female TSA agent to grope me, this is a regular problem. I often have to wait 15 minutes. The lies the TSA agents tell me to try and get me to go through the scanners. If you didn’t fly very often, if you were easily influenced by a fake badge they would convince you that you can’t opt out when you absolutely can. The repeated suggestion, order, directive that I be separated from my belongings.

    The actual groping is generally fine, I wear a skirt now to avoid the crotch grope. See if you wear a skirt you are obviously not a terrorist so we don’t have to grab your crotch. Some of the breast groping is more aggressive than others. Most of the agents are professional to the extent you can be professional in groping another person.

  23. dush says:

    “who work every day to keep the traveling public safe”

    AHAHAHAHAHAHHA!!!

  24. Clux_the_Chicken_Penguin_Hybrid says:

    So it’s a correctly-performed, procedure-following pat down when a TSA agent does it to a passenger, but it’s “violence” when the passenger uses the same techniques on a TSA agent? F that s. I’m so glad that my work travel has been minimized to save money.

    • dush says:

      Yeah it’s like how beating up a suspect is called proper procedure by the police unions. However you’d better not beat up someone.

  25. ned4spd8874 says:

    You touch me, I touch you. Fair enough.

  26. Fisher1949 says:

    When Ms. Price demonstrated to the TSA supervisor what had been done to her TSA calls it violence.

    So TSA finally admits that what they do to us is actually assault, not the courteous and respectful screening they have been trying to convince us it is.

    This is the kind of security we get when they hire high school dropouts with rap sheet, give them a mall cop badge and allow them to harass innocent people with impunity.

    This is the same agency that allows pedophile TSA Supervisor Thomas Harkins to stay on the job at Philadelphia Airport even after being exposed by CBS two weeks ago. This week they fired seven screeners at PHL for bribery but let the pedophile continue to grope children at the checkpoint.

    It’s time to end the “violence” against travelers and replace the TSA.

  27. Fisher1949 says:

    When Ms. Price demonstrated to the TSA supervisor what had been done to her TSA calls it violence.

    So TSA finally admits that what they do to us is actually assault, not the courteous and respectful screening they have been trying to convince us it is.

    This is the kind of security we get when they hire high school dropouts with rap sheet, give them a mall cop badge and allow them to harass innocent people with impunity.

    This is the same agency that allows pedophile TSA Supervisor Thomas Harkins to stay on the job at Philadelphia Airport even after being exposed by CBS two weeks ago. This week they fired seven screeners at PHL for bribery but let the pedophile continue to grope children at the checkpoint.

    It’s time to end the “violence” against travelers and replace the TSA.

  28. Consumer007 says:

    Why is it violence when the consumer / passenger does it, but not when the officials do the same thing?