Best Buy Messes Up Remote Starter Install, Turns Car Into Non-Starter

Michael paid Best Buy to install a remote starter in his car. The installer on duty went far beyond that, and destroyed the wiring so that eventually, the car wouldn’t start at all. Best Buy covered damage to the wires that became evident right away, but not problems that came up later. Michael has now spent more than $3,200 of his own money repairing damage that he says resulted from the botched installation.

He writes:

I had a remote start installed in my car. The “installer” damaged my car by drilling through my fire wall into a wire harness in addition to damaging the wiring and body control module.

The best part is that he didn’t tell anyone that he did it. I found out after I had to bring it back for service because the car wouldn’t start. They looked at it and discovered what he did. I was lucky that the car couldn’t start because the damage could have caused the car to turn off and lock up while I was driving resulting in uncontrollable car-crash-dead. The installer was later fired for his incompetence.

They admitted fault and had just the one harness replaced by a dealer. One week after having the repair done my car continued to have problems. They fiddled around with it and said it was fixed. STILL had problems and brought it to the dealer. Called the BBY repairs claims people and told them about what it would cost to repair the damage. They called the store manager and he denied the claim.

I talked to 10 different managers in the store and district and no one could help me they all said that only the manager of the store had to power to approve the claim and he refused to do it. So with no other option I had to pay to get it fixed myself. There were two options one was to get the battery replaced and have the dealer repair the existing wires $700 or have the repair and replace most of the wiring system that they chopped up incompetently and the body control module that was damaged as a result of the electrical shorts and damages from the bad installation. $2500.

Seeing as I had no money to pay for the incompetence of “professionals” that made my car undriveable I had to go with the cheaper option.

Which worked…… till a few days ago. Cost to repair $2500! Why should I have to pay to fix something that best buy did! They already admitted that the install was done incorrectly. I’m not going to waste my time calling the store to have them tell me that they aren’t going to pay to have it fixed. I never want to speak to anyone at that store again!

I’ve been advised that Small Claims Court will be the best way for me to get compensated. I don’t understand why they are going to force me to do this it is going to cost them for court fees in addition I’m going to ask for the their installation cost the first repair costs and these final repair costs.

I would be willing to sign anything they want waiving all farther claims on this car if they would just pay to have it back in the state it was before they damaged it.

My advise for everyone is go somewhere that cares about doing things right and doing the right thing when they make a mistake.

Filing in small claims court seems daunting, but isn’t all that hard. You don’t even need a lawyer.

Comments

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  1. TheOnlyBob says:

    Had a similar experience at BB years ago with remote key less entry on a truck. They broke the door panel for the truck. Gave us 50% the price to compensate. Close to 200$ off. Got a used door panel for 25$ at u-pull it.

    Never went back after that. i don’t want 18 year olds doing anything on my vehicles.

    • racermd says:

      Not all BBY stores are the same and some are (much) better than others.

      I’ve been to the BBY store near their corporate HQ and have always had good results. I think a lot of that has to do with the proximity to that corporate HQ office (it’s literally blocks away and you can walk there in about 10 minutes). I’ve met quite a few floor drones that don’t have much of a clue but their specialists tend to know what they’re doing there. The remote start I had them install in my own vehicle turned out perfect and they installers weren’t 18 year old rookies (which probably had a lot to do with it).

      That said, I can see how and why some other stores wouldn’t have the same level of quality RE: staff. If the store managers are meeting their financial targets and don’t have too many customer complaints, the district managers and corporate offices likely don’t check in all that often. As a result of that lack of regular contact, ordinary things like customer service and store cleanliness (among other things) will start to suffer and affect the overall shopping experience for customers.

      This isn’t a BBY-only phenomenon. Any corporate entity at a sufficiently large size will eventually reach a point where customer service begins to suffer as a result of a lack of consistent quality checks. It has mostly to do with the (necessary) layers of management as you reach those larger sizes. Some stores are better than others because of different store managers and district managers. So “YMMV” will apply.

    • jimbo831 says:

      “Michael paid Best Buy to install a remote starter in his car.”

      This is where the OP messed up. Never go to Best Buy for anything having to do with your car. Years ago, they actually used to hire car electronics people to do this work, people with years of experience. Now they hire random kids and put them through a 1-2 week training course. Why would anyone let them fiddle with the electronics in their car?

      Find a good, reputable home run place. Most likely the person doing it will have seen and done everything already. Best Buy is the worst choice for this.

      • CommonSense(ಠ_ಠ) says:

        FYI, I have installed remote started myself on several of my cars when I was in Highschool.
        All it takes is reading the directions written by someone who knows the electronics for the specific car, having the tools, and having a manual to tell you how to remove the body panels/dash. It does not take a electronics technician with any special degrees, just someone who can read, comprehend, follow directions, and fit into tight spaces and TIME.

        I dont see anything wrong with hiring even a high school kid to do installs. 1 – 2 weeks training would be way more than I ever had and I installed several car stereos and remote starters.
        You get faster the more you do.
        Hiring some kind of electronics engineer or mechanic would mean like $100 an hour which most people are not willing to pay for when it comes to installs. Instead people would like to pay like $20 to 30 an hour for someone else to spend their time following the directions.

  2. dicobalt says:

    Best Buy… that is all.

    • PsychoRaven says:

      Yup. When will people learn? Only a masochist would go to Best Buy. Hell I wouldn’t have let them touch my car to begin with. I’d have gone to a mechanic and had it installed properly.

  3. CharlesFarley says:

    Take them to small claims court.

    • J. Cohen says:

      The article is above. You must have missed it.

    • gman863 says:

      More specifically, file in Small Claims Court and beg the producers of Judge Judy to pick up the case.

      Judy Sheindlin giving Best Buy a beatdown. The ratings on this episode of the show should rival those of the Super Bowl.

      • bar_foo says:

        Yeah, given that appearing on those tv judge shows requires the consent of both parties, not likely.

  4. Important Business Man (Formerly Will Print T-shirts For Food) says:

    I haven’t been in a Best Buy since my applying for a Best Buy Credit Card fiasco 2 years ago. (I was young and stupid and knew nothing about anything, but I know better now that I’m out of my parents’ house and on my own.)

  5. Blueskylaw says:

    “I talked to 10 different managers in the store and district and no one could help me they all said that only the manager of the store had to power to approve the claim and he refused to do it.”

    Can you say bullsh*t here. So Best Buy is basically saying that a District Manager has NO control over what a store manager does and ONLY a store manager can authorize a repair. Does that mean that store managers can also authorize their own raises without asking a district manager or corporate?

    • INDBRD says:

      The store manager is ultimately in control of the budget and it comes out of store profit.. BUT As a district manager there is no reason not to eat the cost and fix the issue your store caused… just goes to show someone shouldn’t be a DM without balls big enough to stand up to their direct reports and do what is right….

    • VintageLydia says:

      BBY gives a LOT of power to the store manager… far more than most retailers. It’s why some stores are just awesome while others (most) are so terrible you wonder why they are still around. I’m really not even sure what their DMs do.

  6. Marlin says:

    Call the local news as well.
    Squeaky wheel… be it.

  7. sufreak says:

    Start with small claims. You’ll be amazed how quickly they decide to pay your claim before the date comes.

  8. wellfleet says:

    The car installers are the only techs that work within the store that are required to have outside certification via MECP. Most installers are MECP Basic certified (the first of three levels). There are some installers that are MECP Advanced, and maybe a handful that are MECP Master certified.
    It sucks that this guy’s car was damaged, techs certainly make mistakes and we read about those mistakes on Consumerist. Nobody writes to Consumerist about a job that went as expected. I will note that there is practically a zero tolerance policy for mistakes at auto-tech. If you cause damage to a vehicle that results in Best Buy having to pay a claim, you are fired 99% of the time.
    When I worked there, our location had two MECP Advanced techs and not only did they do beautiful work, they did basic mechanic stuff for employees on the side as favors. A major electric repair to my car was quoted at $700 in a shop. My installer did it for a case of Bud Light and I’m driving the same car six years later with no issues.

    • WeaponX says:

      There are Autotechs that can work on cars without being MECP certified. I believe they are coded in the system as Trainee. I know because my cousin was an Autotech at Best Buy for 3 years. He was their Trainee and his two co-workers were Basic and Advanced certified. The Basic guy transferred to another store so they hired another Trainee. Then the Advanced guy got fired for theft and couldn’t replace him. So they asked my cousin to take the test “finally” and get Basic certified.

  9. wellfleet says:

    Also, the store manager and district manager do not deal with damage claims. They submit a claim to the Best Buy incident/claim center (used for all damages caused by employees) and the insurance/claims people approve the claim and charge it to the store’s P&L. The manager has to *submit* the claim but has no power beyond that.

    • homehome says:

      yep, he should just sue cause the ppl he’s talking to don’t really have a word in the decision. I would either escalate higher or just sue.

  10. PSUSkier says:

    This is actually somewhat surprising to me. Usually if there was one thing I saw Best Buy do good work on it was the installs. Granted, the prices for the installations were usually a bit high, but professional work was provided in return.

    /Bad apples everywhere, etc.

  11. CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

    I have very little knowledge of cars, but I’m confused a bit. If Best Buy admitted fault, and sent it to a dealer for repair, the dealer repairs it, and then it still has problems. Did the dealer fix it or not? Was there more damaged that neither Best Buy nor the dealer caught? And where does replacing the battery come into play?

    • Stickdude says:

      He had two options:

      1. Have the dealer try to repair the wires – cost $700
      2. Have the dealer completely replace the wires – cost $2500

      Since BB wasn’t willing to pay for the damage they had done, he chose option 1. That didn’t work, so he was forced to choose option 2.

  12. CrazyEyed says:

    Yup Small Claims. Make sure you you toss in some lost work time in there too. Hit them where it hurts: $$$

  13. Torgonius wants an edit button says:

    He should be grateful the car didn’t explode when he turned the key.

  14. Dave B. says:

    “Michael paid Best Buy to install a remote starter in his car”

    Well there’s your problem.

  15. framitz says:

    Sue for punitive damage as well as the repair. BB needs to learn a lesson… no chance they’ll learn, but you may get some additional deserved compensation.

  16. dorianh49 says:

    Did the Best Buy installer drill through all of your commas, too? ;)

  17. bsh0544 says:

    As a side note, get a car that comes with remote start or don’t get remote start. Every aftermarket system I’ve seen is incredibly sketchy and usually involves some circumvention of your car’s anti-theft system(s).

  18. TheSpatulaOfLove says:

    Considering how many electronics are in a car nowadays, I don’t think I would risk the option of having someone who isn’t trained on my specific vehicle make monkey around with wiring.

    Being a VW person, I know one small electrical problem will cause an amazing amount of pain when dealing with the car. When it came time to install my car stereo, I used my own wiring and left the factory stuff laying next to it. This way, if I develop any electrical voodoo, I can quickly back out what changes I made and prove my stuff isn’t the cause.

    Fortunately, there are great VW forums out there for help on how to attack certain issues, but I found that doesn’t hold true for all manufacturers.

  19. some.nerd says:

    I don’t know if this varies from state to state, but I think the most you can receive in MA small claims court is in the neighborhood of $2k monies. Just check the limits before you go a-filin’.

  20. skakh says:

    I guess the obvious question is: why would any sane person allow a Best Buy employee access to their vehicle’s electrical system? Most of us won’t let a Best Buy employee touch anything we own, certainly not a car.

  21. Anachronism says:

    My sister had a Subaru as a first car. For a birthday present, my dad takes it to best buy for a new car stereo.

    Afterwards, the car blows fuses and stops running about 5 minutes after it is started. Can’t go anywhere. I’m the family mechanic, and happen to be flying out on vacation. I get to spent part of my vacation fixing the car (yay).

    I take the radio out, and find the worst hackjob install that I’ve ever seen. Wires are wrapped together with no connectors, just electrical tape. The power wire from the deck doesn’t go into any part of what is left of the factory radio harness (which has become useless to ever install a factory radio or an aftermarket harness again- the connector was cut off one of the wiring groups).

    The power wire actually goes to the ECU power line. Apparently the tech just grabbed the first wire he saw that got 12V with the car on and tapped it. The radio drew too much power, and thus would blow the fuse, or perhaps this guy’s gowaful wire job also induced a short somewhere else. In any case, tapping the ECU power is why instead of losing the accessory circuit, the engine can die and the car can be inoperable at any second.

    What’s worse? Best Buy charged them for a harness. When we go back to Best Buy, the manager haughtily informs us that they *always* install with a harness, and any problems must have been preexisting. When presented with pictures of the botch job, suddenly it becomes “Oh, well, we didn’t have a harness in stock in this case, but the work was still done correctly.” So why were we charged for a harness and why didn’t you call when you didn’t have one in stock instead or irreversibly damaging the wiring harness? “Oh, um, look, we will fix the car.” No, you won’t, you will pay for our reputable repair shop to do the work, or the first call will be to the police for fraud, the second will be to the news, and the third will be to start the lawsuit.

    For me, this ordeal reinforced the lesson that you DECLINE free installation of car stereos (and pretty much any install from a big box store, and spend the 45 minutes to do it yourself. You won’t randomly decide to hack the shit out of your wiring just because the harness that plugs right in won’t be there for another day.

    • GrayMatter says:

      I bought a replacement radio from Crutchfield. Now I am reasonably competent, so I did it myself. But I was impressed with the clarity of the instructions. And, when I had a small problem, I called them. They answered right away, and explained what needed to be done.

      If you are not comfortable with doing it yourself, but know someone, they could do it. And, there was no wire cutting; the special harness/connector they supplied did all the work.

  22. ferozadh says:

    Modern car engines do not need long periods of warm up. It’s a waste of gas.

    • deathbecomesme says:

      I like turtles

      • ferozadh says:

        But do turtles like you? They probably run away screaming since you’re apparently death incarnate. But you have the obvious advantage here: turtles can’t run fast or scream. You’ve chosen your prey well.

    • Costner says:

      Maybe not – but if you live in a climate where snow and ice are common, you would soon learn that it takes a long time to melt the ice and snow from a windshield, and when the temps are hovering around -15F, it takes a bit to warm the car up to the point you can’t see your breath.

      I don’t currently have a remote start on my vehicle, but I wish I did. They make winter that much easier, and it is really nice if you have children so you can put them in a warm car rather than having them freeze for the first 15 minutes of the trip. For an infant, a remote start can be a huge deal.

      • Princess Beech loves a warm cup of treason every morning says:

        Agree — even if you prepped your car up for a Midwest winter you have to remember the car is still made of materials that undergo stress as it constantly expands or contracts. In a 10-below temp, you’d still at least make sure that your engine is warmed up sufficiently — you can hear the stress in the engine if your car isn’t warm enough. Besides, if it’s just after a snowstorm or a relatively frosty morning, all the snow and ice is caked up on the windshield anyway, and while a snow/ice scraper can help, you’ll still have to warm up your car to make life easier.

        Don’t have a remote car starter, wish we do, but it can wait for now.

  23. There's room to move as a fry cook says:

    Filing a local small claims case, in a city with a Best Buy store, would be your best option. If they ignore and don’t pay the judgement then the sheriff can enter the store and seize merchandise to cover the amount owed.

  24. Costner says:

    And the two resident Best Buy employees who call “BS” on every OP who dares complain about Best Buy ready to post in defense of BB in 3…2…1…

    • Bionic Data Drop says:

      Yep, I’m waiting for Latentius to explain how this is all the OP’s fault. If no explanation is readily available, then this must be an isolated incident that is one single employee’s fault and Best Buy shouldn’t be judged as a company because of it.

      • CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

        Yes, the same reason you people blame Best Buy every time is no different. Except that we actually have experience dealing with these situations typically, and can offer a view of what might really have happened.

        Because obviously what an OP writes in about and how the writers @ Consumerist spin it must always be the truth.

        • Bionic Data Drop says:

          Best Buy screwed up the OP’s car and refused to make the situation right, plain and simple. Where is the spin? Please tell us how Best Buy is an innocent victim of this slanderous OP.

          It isn’t consumerist’s fault either. Had Best Buy done the right thing in the first place, we wouldn’t be having this conversation.

          • CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

            I didn’t offer an opinion about this one, but thanks.

            Obviously if the tech drilled through parts of the car, the store should have paid for it. In my earlier post, I questioned that once Best Buy paid for the repairs why was that not the end of it. I didn’t blame the OP at all.

            • rdaex says:

              because that WASNT THE END OF IT.
              The problems manifested themselves because BBY took the cheap way out, instead of replacing the whole harness, now things are starting to fail.

              • CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

                Wow. Comprehension is not easy for some of you.

                Best Buy makes a mistake, the guy complains, he goes to the dealer to fix it & Best Buy pays for it. Now he’s coming back and saying there is more wrong with it. Why didn’t the dealer either fix what was wrong to begin with or tell him BEFORE they fixed it there was more wrong so he could go to Best Buy with the larger estimate?

        • Costner says:

          Because obviously what an OP writes in about and how the writers @ Consumerist spin it must always be the truth.

          Maybe… maybe not. However it probably holds a tad more credibility than you since you aren’t involved in these incidents and have zero knowledge as to how they actually went down. Saying you can “offer a view of what might really have happened” due to your experience is like me saying I can explain what it feels like to give birth to a child because I ate at Taco Bell and had to sit on the toilet for 20 minutes.

          Not the same thing… sorry. You are no more qualified to give your opinion on these situations than anyone else here regardless whether they do work, or have worked at Best Buy. We can only go by the information presented, and although that often requires some assumption and perhaps a bit of doubt on what is written, we don’t just get to make things up to support our predetermined viewpoints on how things are supposed to work.

          I of course need to admit my original post wasn’t fair… since it appears you started posting even before I wrote it. I find the humor in that.

          • CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

            You typically seem to have some sense in your comments, but that is ridiculous. How am I not more qualified to answer questions about Best Buy, Geek Squad, or policies than you or others? I deal with these things almost every day. We’re not perfect, but I know we have far more positive experiences with clients than negative ones.

            It’s like me telling my mechanic what my opinion is on what’s wrong. I have no basis for my answer because I don’t fix cars or know anything about them. So obviously my thinking must be the right thinking.

            And your remark as to my earlier post was not me defending Best Buy, but simply asking questions as what was going on. Try reading the comment next time.

            • Costner says:

              Because most of these Best Buy posts aren’t about what the policy is, but rather what poor customer experience the customer suffers through. It doesn’t matter that you might know Best Buy policy inside and out… because that really isn’t the point of debate here. In the past, you have basically called and OP a liar merely because you disagreed with what they said… yet your comments were not based upon a policy disagreement but rather you simply didn’t believe them.

              In those cases – no… you are not any more qualified to speak about the issues than anyone else. This is especially true when you aren’t involved in the situation, so aside from casting doubt upon the credibility of an OP you really aren’t adding anything.

              Plus – and I’m sure you would acknowledge this point – you have a clear bias as you are trying to defend your employer. That is human nature… I’m not faulting you there because many people would do the same, but you have to admit it makes it appear you are working for your employer (even if you aren’t doing so in an official capacity) so it calls your objectivity into question.

              Really… the simple fact you actually registered the username of “CurrentGeekSquadEmployee” sort of makes it impossible to assume you can be objective in these cases.

              • CurrentGeekSquadEmployee says:

                None of you who post on these stories are there either. Yet you consistently take the side of the OP in situations where you have no information other than what is posted. At least where I comment, I will typically have knowledge of a similar set of circumstances. And I do not officially represent Best Buy, but I identified myself when I first started posting here as a long time employee.

                • Costner says:

                  Actually I often make the comment that there are two sides to every story, but at the same time I acknowledge this is a website focused upon the consumer. This means there will always be a bias towards the consumer, and the OP typically (but not always) is favored as being truthful.

                  Obviously we can’t know all the facts in every situation, and there are times when it makes sense to call out an OP for misleading information, or something that doesn’t pass the smell test, but in more times than not we simply have to go on what is provided and there is a certain amount of assumption involved when we assume the OP is being honest. Is that the case 100% of the time? No… but how much fun would this all be, and what value would any of it add if nobody ever discussed a situation unless we knew both sides of the story?

                  Fact is, 99% of the time the other side either never responds, or they say “no comment” so it is probably unlikely we will ever know the full story. You are more than welcome to call something into question, but I hope you realize when you do so on a Best Buy story it is often difficult to take your seriously because your bias is obvious. Even if you intend no bias the appearance exists due to your previous defense of Best Buy coupled with your devotion to your employer (as witnessed by you using it within your username). It borders on being a paid shill for the company – so I dare say when it comes to a Best Buy topic people will always take your posts with a grain of salt. You can disagree, but that is my perception.

  25. Princess Beech loves a warm cup of treason every morning says:

    Best Buy goes above and beyond!!!

    Above and beyond poor customer service, that is.

  26. The Colonel says:

    I think the dealer ripped you off as well. I’m not saying it’s impossible, but it’s not likely that it should have cost 2500 to replace wiring.

    • Zelgadis says:

      Having worked in dealer parts departments before, I can say with certainty that wiring harnesses for many car brands these days are ludicrously expensive.

      I not only believe he had to pay $2500 for that, but I also think he’s damned lucky it wasn’t a lot more.

    • bsh0544 says:

      It’s worth noting that the $2500 figure includes the body control module, which way more complex than just a pile of wires. As another reply said, he’s lucky to have gotten it for $2500 including labor. I wouldn’t be shocked by a BCM priced at $2500 by itself.

  27. cris3429 says:

    I used to be a manager for best buy and here is exactly what you need to do. Best buy has an insurance claim department for damage done to vehicles over $200. You need to go back to the store and have them fill out this claim and submit it to the claims department. Make sure you have at least two quotes for the repair from different mechanics. Best buy’s claim department is actually very quick to respond to these since it’s the insurance company not best buy that handles it after the claim is submitted. Expect to be contacted within 48 hours, unless it’s the weekend then expect a call by Tuesday. If they refuse to submit a claim then you have to sue unfortunately. I’m glad that they fire the installer because any time you damage a car and don’t notify that it happened, you are automatically fired. Speak with the Customer Solutions Manager Because they are the manager in charge of the install bay. Good luck, hope it works out.

  28. cris3429 says:

    I used to be a manager for best buy and here is exactly what you need to do. Best buy has an insurance claim department for damage done to vehicles over $200. You need to go back to the store and have them fill out this claim and submit it to the claims department. Make sure you have at least two quotes for the repair from different mechanics. Best buy’s claim department is actually very quick to respond to these since it’s the insurance company not best buy that handles it after the claim is submitted. Expect to be contacted within 48 hours, unless it’s the weekend then expect a call by Tuesday. If they refuse to submit a claim then you have to sue unfortunately. I’m glad that they fire the installer because any time you damage a car and don’t notify that it happened, you are automatically fired. Speak with the Customer Solutions Manager Because they are the manager in charge of the install bay. Good luck, hope it works out.

  29. utslain says:

    You have to consider where you are taking your car at… It’s really not a professional shop. The guy at the summerville, sc store is a cocky moron who has at least 3 times screwed up a customers car and guess what ? He still works there! That’s right, your car is next.. The certifications these guys get are a joke. I’ve seen them copy the answers down and pass them to each other. Do yourself a favor.. take it to a “Professional” shop to have work done to it. Elearnings are not a resolution!

    • cris3429 says:

      I think you’re confusing the best buy certification and MECP. MECP is a national independent certification program. Sort of like ACE for mechanics. Their tests are conducted at a test facility and change everytime they are done so copying answers is only a guaranteed way to fail. Plus you don’t get a copy of each question and answer when you take it so there’s no way for you to get the answers to copy in the first place

  30. cris3429 says:

    P.S. is this a Honda by chance? Their dealerships are notorious for over charging for services by hundreds if not thousands of dollars, at least in the Cincinnati area.

  31. Kuri says:

    Reminds me of when we had a remote starter put in our minivan. We took it into Walmart to fix the stereo and after that the remote starter didn’t work.

  32. benh999 says:

    I understand Best Buy’s point of view on this. They got a bill, paid it, then the guy comes back after that with more complaints. How do they know the issues are their fault? It sounds like the dealer did a lousy job inspecting and fixing problem initially.

  33. AllanG54 says:

    Yeah, they fucked up a remote start on my brother in law’s car too. Had the car for two days and then said they were unable to do it. Luckily they didn’t do much damage and he was able to bring the car to a place that knows what they’re doing and get everything done right.

  34. cbutler says:

    This is what happens when you leave technical work to minimally/marginally trained big box employees to do the job instead of much better experienced mom&pop shops As an ex-pro audio installer, we were the guys that were sub contracted by BB to either fix or figure out what they screwed up on a customers car. And let me tell ya, they did it often.

    This was 10 years ago when I worked at an audio installer so it might have changed. back then their installers at large were not even certified. While this is true at many mom&pop shops, there is almost always a couple of guys that are and supervise the work others do.

  35. WhenPigsFly says:

    Years ago I had a remote starter installed in my 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee at Circuit City. When I drove it home that night, I noticed the dash lights wouldn’t come on. WTH? I went right back and told them. They accidentally drilled a hole through a circuit that lights up the interior of the car. They would repair it the next day since they were about to close. The next afternoon I picked up the Jeep and everything was all square. Remote starter was fine also. When I bought by Subaru I thought about getting a remote starter but reneged on the idea after this incident.

  36. WhenPigsFly says:

    Years ago I had a remote starter installed in my 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee at Circuit City. When I drove it home that night, I noticed the dash lights wouldn’t come on. WTH? I went right back and told them. They accidentally drilled a hole through a circuit that lights up the interior of the car. They would repair it the next day since they were about to close. The next afternoon I picked up the Jeep and everything was all square. Remote starter was fine also. When I bought by Subaru I thought about getting a remote starter but reneged on the idea after this incident.

  37. Extended-Warranty says:

    I find this story a bit odd. Any big company has this kind of stuff insured. Perhaps there is more to the story such as pre-existing damage?

    What makes everyone think a mom and pop is the best hands-down? It’s not exactly common to find people who both have a trade AND are smart business owners. I’ve seen tons of people burned by mom and pops who make unethical decisions to save money.

    To say these installers aren’t trained is BS. They have a national certification….

  38. dush says:

    Wouldn’t his insurance company be the ones to go after Best Buy?

  39. Sham03 says:

    Send them a demand letter via certified mail with delivery receipt threatening legal action. I did this when I was having trouble with a title insurance company. Within two weeks, I had a check in hand and didn’t even have to go to small claims court. Little effort, big results. For an example, Google “demand letter example” and look for the nolo.com link.

  40. CrackedLCD says:

    “My advise to everyone” is that Consumerist should either edit these diatribes for clarity or not publish letters from people who have the English proficiency of a Cocker Spaniel. A few grammatical errors here and there are par for the course these days, but this thing is damn near incomprehensible.

  41. sopmodm14 says:

    attorney/small claims court

    if the store manager is subpoena’d, and refuses to show up, auto win

    best buy will pay eventually

  42. cupcakechardonnay says:

    Go to the local Attorney General’s Office. I am currently going through the “claims process” at Best Buy for the EXACT same issue. If enough people complain to Attorney General about this issue it may eventually start a class action lawsuit.

    After two weeks of phone calls to Best Buy they are still trying to run me in circles. I will be contacting the Attorney General’s Office shortly unless I get some immediate results.