At Least I Tried To Buy A Vacuum From Best Buy

Gregg ordered a new Dyson vacuum this past weekend, and used a Best Buy gift card toward the purchase. When he arrived at the store, his order wasn’t ready, even though the exact item he had ordered wasn’t on the sales floor. They couldn’t rush the online order process, couldn’t give him back the $30 from the gift card for his in-store purchase, and couldn’t do much of anything useful. So he waited for a refund and bought the same item from Lowe’s. The notification e-mail never did come through.

Given the 20% off that Dyson is running through Mother’s Day, the wife and I decided to get a Dyson vacuum. It was May 5th, and we were preparing for a Derby party at our house. I found the vacuum that we wanted a Dyson DC24 Animal at Best Buy for $359.99 and it was available for pick up at my local store, so I ordered it at 3:45pm.

The web site stated that most online orders are ready within 45 minutes, so I went to the store 1 hour later to pick up my vacuum. I was told that I was unable to pick up my vacuum (which they had in stock, I found it on the sales floor) since my BestBuy.com order had not yet hit their system. They advised me to wait until I received the confirmation e-mail. Not being one who likes to wait to purchase mundane items like vacuums, I suggested that since the vacuum was in stock (at this point I had it in my hands at the customer service area) and I was actually at the store to pick it up, if they could just cancel the online order and then sell me the vacuum so I could be on my way.

The difficulty was that I had purchased with a $30 Best Buy gift card, and wanted to use that $30 towards the in-store purchase, but it would be days before the gift card got refunded. So I was in the store, with the gift card and payment for the remaining amount, the vacuum in hand, and yet I was unable to get the vacuum. I cancelled the order the following day, and purchased the vacuum at Lowes.com, picked up in-store within 30 minutes of ordering, painless.

I did wait all night and half of the following day for the “your item is ready to be picked up” e-mail from Best Buy, but it never arrived. Likewise I never received an e-mail notifying me that my order was cancelled. Just another story of great Best Buy customer service.

Comments

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  1. Golfer Bob says:

    Well at least he doesn’t make the wife do the mundane appliance purchasing…

    • Fubish says: I don't know anything about it, but it seems to me... says:

      He bought it for her birthday.

      • Golfer Bob says:

        I thought it was for and early Mother’s day so she could clean his house for his derby day party…

  2. Benny says:

    Why did the OP gone to Best Buy in the first place? Bad decision. Could of have just get price match some where else.

    • dolemite says:

      I got a gift card to GameStop for xmas. I’ve vowed to never shop there after bad experiences in the past (and I was successful for about 10 years). So…I bit the bullet and used the card. Wow…next time I’ll know better. Just sell it online or something. Not worth the headache, even though the item I got was *free* after the gift card.

      • jimbo831 says:

        My wife’s parents got her a $100 gift card to Barnes & Noble two Christmases ago. This was the worst gift/curse ever. She ordered several books online and after 2 months they had never shipped and B&N just kept giving us the runaround. In the end, they gave us more gift cards as compensation and it was absolutely not worth it. If I could do it over, we would sell the gift cards somewhere.

    • Jawaka says:

      Because he had a gift card. its in the article.

      • MeowMaximus says:

        A gift card is no reason to shop at WorstBuy. Should have just thrown it away, or sold it on Craigslist. Sorry, this was VERY foolish on the OP’s part.

        • Overheal says:

          Yeah, just throw money away. Makes sense.

          • MeowMaximus says:

            Gift cards are not money, they are basically useless. Getting a gift card says that the person does not care enough to find you a gift to might actually like. Cash is always preferable.

    • flip says:

      The 1st and 3rd paragraph explains that

  3. Extended-Warranty says:

    Doesn’t their system say to wait for a confirmation email to pick it up just like every other store does?

    I think once you went in there, raised a stink, and made it clear you wanted to cancel it, they probably knew not to fulfill the order.

    • Jeremy says:

      It said be ready in 45 minutes. He waited an hour. Email confirmation or not they should have grabbed the item needed off the shelf and took care of him. I would raise a stink too if I saw the item I wanted to buy and they refuse to sell it to me! This is simple customer service, he isnt trying to do anything more than purchase a item that he saw online and was promised to him.

      • Golfer Bob says:

        It appears they were attempting that but the OP was upset since the gift card couldn’t be refunded the $30 dollars to then be used for the in the store purchase.

      • elangomatt says:

        It said online orders are usually ready in 45 minutes, not guarnteed in 45 minutes. I imagine it also probably said to wait for the confirmation email before going to pick it up too. That being said, it is just crappy customer service to not be able to fulfill the order in store very easily for an item that is in stock on the sales floor.

      • Extended-Warranty says:

        Online purchases go through a fraud check. If it takes longer than expected, there isn’t much you can do.

      • Overheal says:

        It said most orders are ready in 45 minutes. It doesn’t guarantee your own order will be ready in 45 minutes.

        He was better off to wait for the email. Either way if he wanted it faster than that, why not drive down, knowing it was in stock, and grab it from the shelf? FYI: you can also phone the store and have them slap your name on it, without any money up front, and they will hold the item till closing time.

  4. Coffee says:

    When he arrived at the store, his order wasn’t ready, even though the exact item he had ordered wasn’t on the sales floor.

    This sentence needs either one more or one less negative to be correct.

  5. syxx says:

    if his name is gregg he should have just bought it at h h gregg

    • Coyote says:

      Agreed, simply because nobody ever buys there so they are DESPERATE to make sales/commission. They beat online prices on a Dyson and 60″ TV for me.

  6. Kryndis says:

    I’m not blaming the op, but I am wondering if perhaps he entered his email address incorrectly? He should have received a receipt almost immediately that specifically stated it wasn’t the confirmation email and to wait for a confirmation email before going to pick up the item. If he didn’t receive it, nor any other email communications, I wonder if perhaps there was a typo?

    • vastrightwing says:

      OK, I’ll do it for you. I blame the OP. What was he thinking? You should have sold the card for 50% of it’s value on craigslist and gone to Lowes. You don’t actually buy stuff at Best Buy, it’s only a showroom!

  7. KFW says:

    Even though the exact item he ordered *WAS* on the sales floor — again, terrible editing.

  8. The_IT_Crone says:

    Wait. You went there before it was ready AND IT WASN’T READY? THE OUTRAGE!

  9. Southern says:

    Another possibility, did you get a confirmation NUMBER when you submitted the order? The OP might have hit “Submit Order”, or “Confirm Order” or whatever, but until that confirmation number (or reservation number, or whatever they call it) is displayed on the screen, the order may not have been submitted properly.

    At least with that number they should be able to track down the order.

  10. maxamus2 says:

    1) Why on earth are you shopping at Best Buy?
    2) Why on earth are you buying an overpriced vacuum cleaner?
    3) Why didn’t you just call the store to see if they had it then just go there and buy it?
    4) Why on earth are you shopping at a Best Buy?

    • Coyote says:

      1) I don’t know, because he thought maybe he could save another $30 by using a gift card? Seems smart to me, even if you don’t normally shop there.
      2) Have you ever owned a Dyson? They are worth every penny if you and your spouse are long haired freaky people and your house is a zoo. I pull up at least three containers full of cat, dog, and human hair, hay, rabbit poop every week. If the hose or beater bar does clog, every part is accessible enough to clean it without tools. I think the other day was the first time I’ve washed the filters in the two years I’ve had it (You’re supposed to do every three months) and that was only because I remembered to, not because it lost suction.
      3) You don’t even have to call, you can check online and have them hold one. That’s the point of online ordering/store pickup… if the store does it right.
      4) Insanity is defined as asking the same thing multiple times and expecting different answers.

    • Southern says:

      If I never shopped at any place most Consumerists said never to shop at, I’d be stuck shopping for groceries at my corner gas station. :p

  11. BigDragon says:

    It’s a vacuum. Did you really need to order it online before visiting the store? It’s not like a vacuum is going to sell out or other stores don’t have the same vacuum. Just go to the store and buy it the old-fashioned way. Simple.

    I agree with the people pointing out that the OP probably entered their email wrong.

  12. oubobcat says:

    The last two times I’ve tried online ordering from Best Buy I haven’t got an email, even though their system processed it and the store held it. The first time I saw the refund come back to me and the second time just recently I went to the store and found that the order cancelled since it had been 8 days, still need to check to see if I was refunded yet. I used their system in the past and it always seemed to work well and send you reminder emails to pick up your item before they stopped holding it. I am at the point where its no longer worth it to order from them.

  13. arcticJKL says:

    “The difficulty was that I had purchased with a $30 Best Buy gift card, and wanted to use that $30 towards the in-store purchase”

    Actually, you had a piece of plastic with no monetary value. You had already used the $30 earlier that day.

  14. ColoradoShark says:

    Husband Pro-hint: NEVER BUY AN APPLIANCE AS A GIFT FOR YOUR WIFE!
    The all-caps was 100% intentional.

    • Golfer Bob says:

      I think when you refer to her as “the wife” this rule doesn’t apply

    • Arctic Snowbot says:

      my wife loves the sewing machine I got for her birthday last year. And the kitchen aide mixer. So what you mean to say is “my wife doesn’t like appliances for presents!” or possibly you don’t know your wife well enough to know what she likes/wants?

  15. rockelscorcho says:

    Best Buy did their job! They did what they always do…screw things up! How can you get upset with them for doing that? It’s like getting upset at your dog because he eats his own poop.

  16. Costner says:

    I blame the OP merely because he thought a Dyson was a good value even when they are on sale. Dyson’s are popular because of marketing, and because people who buy them have no basis to compare them against other vacuums. Think about it – when is the last time someone bought a vacuum when their old one was working? It rarely happens, so when people buy them they are comparing them to a 12 year old Dirt Devil that hasn’t been cleaned or maintained since the day it was new… it stands to reson why the Dyson impresses them out of the box.

    Dyson vacuums are not any better than many other competing vacs out there, and in fact indepedent side by side testing has shown them to be inferior in many ways. They also have enough refurbished units available to keep woot.com busy several days a month plus a half dozen other outlets that stock refurbs at any given point (even Best Buy at one time).

    Consumer Reports for instance (the parent company of Consumerist) has tested them many, many times… and they have NEVER come out on top. Not even close. They are overpriced and you are paying for those clever commercials, but the technology found inside of a Dyson can be found in many other vacuums and a much lower cost if that is what you are excited about.

    For the same money you could get a Miele and have ten times the vacuum, or you could buy a Hoover that uses the same cyclone bagless technology for about one third or one fourth the price of a Dyson.

    This does a pretty good job of summing up some of the misleading info about Dyson vacs: http://redpushpin.blogspot.com/2009/03/james-dyson-sucks.html

    James Dyson is the Amar Bose of the vacuum cleaner world. In a previous life I’m pretty sure he would probably have been selling snake oil.

    • Golfer Bob says:

      You say all this and yet you’ve never tried a Dyson yourself? Is it possible that CR could be wrong or maybe other people judge by different criteria?

      • Costner says:

        I have tried Dysons – and was not impressed. And Consumer Reports hasn’t just tested Dyson once… they have tested them countless times, yet Dyson is never anywhere near the top.

        I fully understand why someone who shells out $500 for a vacuum will have a strong desire to think they made a good purchase, but when put to the test in independent, scientific testing, Dyson never comes out on top.

        That isn’t my opinion – that is merely a fact.

        • zz9 says:

          I got mine free, after years of using every machine of the market. So that psycology doesn’t apply. I am actually a bit of a contrarian. I loather Monster, even though we were pushed to sell them and made huge commission. I haven’t got any Apple products but love my HTC phone which is far better than the iPhone and Bose are okay but nowhere near the best for sound quality. I have a JVC TH-A10 DVD surround sound system that I compared side by side with the top of the range Bose in our stores demo room. It wiped the floor with the Bose. And for 1/3 of the price. Really shocked me as I never rated JVC for audio.
          So I’m certainly not some brand snob that buys into marketing and brand image. I used every cleaner on the market for years. I *know* Dysons are fantastic from first hand experience over twenty years.

        • Golfer Bob says:

          Well good thing you’re not taking all of this Dyson stuff to seriously then.

    • BennieHannah says:

      I’ve had my Dyson for 12 years. Before that — with our kids, dogs and cats and foster puppies — I was buying a low-end (about $150) vacuum every year. Seriously, I vacuum EVERY DAY. I priced out some really expensive vacuums (although people call Dyson an expensive vacuum the brand really falls toward the middle in terms of pricing), and settled on a moderately-priced Dyson.

      Twelve years later, the $350 bucks I spent has paid off. I like that it comes apart completely and each part can be cleaned — a must when you’re picking up dog fur and cat litter because after a while it can begin to smell. It picks up pennies and Barbie shoes without gagging. Never had a single problem, though if I did, a friend who has one and has dealt with customer service says you can buy individual parts that snap right in. My only con is that it is heavy.

      Of course that was twelve years ago. I don’t know how the brand has changed since then, or if other brands have put out models that also strip down for cleaning and have the same reliability of the early Dyson cleaners. I just know I’m happy with the one I purchased and would likely buy one again — though I probably won’t ever need another vacuum!

    • zz9 says:

      I worked in electrical retail for years. Dysons are fantastic machines. In terms of performance, functionality, ease of servicing (cleaning brushes etc) and reliability and lifespan they are great. There’s a reason they come with a five year guarantee.

      Maybe you can’t remember when Dysons first came out? You know those upright cleaners with a hose attachment? Dyson invented that, everyone else copied them*. Bagless? Dyson invented that, eveyone else copied them. (Though they resisted because they made so much profit selling replacement bags.) A Hoover director even admitted in an interview they wished they had bought Dyson’s patents and kept them off the market.

      And for years Dyson didn’t advertise. Their first TV advert was made only because a big retailer demanded a TV spot or they wouldn’t place their order. It was word of mouth that sold Dysons for years.

      The reason there are so many refurbished Dysons is that the basic machine is so well made that even at ten or fifteen years old it is worth refurbishing. I have used other (top brand) cleaners that fell apart after a few months of in store use. A year ago the place I worked did a trade in offer for people buying Dysons. We had lots of customers trading in the very original Dyson from twenty years ago, still working perfectly, for new ones. Some staff took some of those old machines home to keep and use. Hair caught around the beater bar? On most vacuums you need a screwdriver and to take four screws out to get at the beater bar. With Dysons you use a coin to undo one clip and the whole brush bar slides out.

      * The copiers beat Dyson to market with the hose. It was in Dysons original prototype that he showed to every manufacturer. But because of some prior art in the 1930s, that was never made, he couldn’t patent it. So they copied it. But it is standard now thanks to Dyson.

      For cylinder cleaners Miele are great machines. I have a Miele washing machine and they are the best you can get. Miele cylinder cleaners are very well built, you can easily stand on them without anything breaking and they are powerful. As long as you are happy buying bags again and again they are great.

      • zz9 says:

        BTW, I once had a customer complain that a Dyson cleaner she borrowed for a couple of days was “terrible”. The reason? She hated the fact that she had to empty the bin after every room! I tried to explain that that meant it was doing its job, picking up all the dirt her old machine was missing, and that once it had got rid of all that dirt it would need emptying far less often, but she wouldn’t have it. She loved that her old machine she could use for “months” before she had to replace the bag.

      • Costner says:

        “I worked in electrical retail for years. Dysons are fantastic machines. In terms of performance, functionality, ease of servicing (cleaning brushes etc) and reliability and lifespan they are great. There’s a reason they come with a five year guarantee.”

        If you worked retail it is doubtful you were an authorized service facility and thus you would never see a vacuum if it was returned for service outside of the initial 30 or 90 day return window (depending upon the store you worked at). As far as ease of servicing, I had a 15 year old el-cheapo Eureka that used two clips on the bottom to remove the plastic cover – it took all of about 10 seconds to open. I’m not giving Dyson credit for doing what many other vacuums also do. That isn’t innovative and surely isn’t worth paying a premium for.

        By the way – a new clutch in a Dyson costs over $50, and it is not considered user serviceable. They brag about not having any belts, but the reality is they do have belts inside the clutch so when they break you are stuck bringing it to a service center instead of swapping a $3 belt like you would on so many other vacuums out there.

        “Maybe you can’t remember when Dysons first came out? You know those upright cleaners with a hose attachment? Dyson invented that, everyone else copied them*. Bagless? Dyson invented that, eveyone else copied them.”

        This isn’t even remotely true. There were many upright vacuums with hoses and numerous bagless designs that existed before Dyson came along. Commercial uprights never had hoses I’ll grant you that (they still don’t), but residential models did including Hoovers for many years before Dyson even existed. The only Dyson “innovation” was using cyclonic bagless technology in an upright vacuum cleaner where others hadn’t done so. That said, even the cyclonic tech wasn’t Dyson’s idea as it had been used in commercial dust collection systems for decades. He was the first to put it in a upright though so he gets credit there along with a patent.

        “The reason there are so many refurbished Dysons is that the basic machine is so well made that even at ten or fifteen years old it is worth refurbishing.”

        Oh come on. Go out and look for the reburb Dysons that are currently for sale and you will see they are the current generation models. The ball is one of the most readily available reconditioned Dysons and it has only been sold since 2005. Also, Dyson vacs have only been in the US since 2002 according to Dyson himself, so any refurb you see isn’t fifteen years old. There are more refurbs because a lot of people take them home and realize they aren’t really that special. They use them once or twice and then realize they paid $500 for a colorful well marketed machine that performs no better than a vacuum half the price, so they return them. Any item that has been used cannot be sold as new – thus it goes back to a Dyson service center for reconditioning only to be sold again.

        It should say somethign that both Best Buy and Sears were able to stock reconditioned Dysons in their stores nationwide (I’m unsure if this is still the case, but it was at one time). Do you know how many reconditioned units it takes to stock Best Buy and Sears? Why don’t we see any other vacuum cleaner in that same situation? I don’t see refurbed Hoovers for sale at Best Buy, nor do I see refurbed LG’s or Electroluxes at Sears.

        “A year ago the place I worked did a trade in offer for people buying Dysons. We had lots of customers trading in the very original Dyson from twenty years ago, still working perfectly, for new ones.”

        Your story really starts to fall apart here since 20 years ago was 1992. Dyson claims they didn’t start selling vacuums in the US until 2002, so unless your customers had a time machine I don’t see how this is even possible.

        Second, why would customers trade in a vacuum that was “working perfectly”? The Dyson technology hasn’t changed and the cyclonic tech is the same, so why swap for something newer if the old one is still so amazing? I could see a few people trading just because, or a few that maybe wanted the ball instead of what they had – but we know trade ins don’t drop the cost much (since Dyson themselves doesn’t provide credit for trades) so basically your store couldn’t have given more than $50 credit with a trade. Are you suggesting people felt their old Dyson’s weren’t worth more than $50?? That is hardly a ringing endorsement – if they were really that good then most people would keep them for a basement or as a backup.

        Face it – you’re making things up because you are a Dyson apologist. I can only assume you make more commission off of a Dyson sale and/or you bought one yourself and are trying to make yourself feel better about spending $500 – $600 for a vacuum cleaner.

        I’m not saying they are “bad” vacuum cleaners, but the reality is they simply don’t stand up to side-by-side testing. In fact, I’ve yet to see an independent test that actually resulted in Dyson “winning” a comparison. Ever. The simple truth is they are overpriced just as Bose speakers are overpriced. It isn’t so much about the product as it is about the marketing. Dyson is a marketing genius and he should get credit for that, but when it comes down to performance of the actual machine I’m afraid he makes just another vacuum cleaner.

        • zz9 says:

          I live and work in the UK, not the USA. I worked for the first UK national chain to stock Dyson, called Rumbelows, in 1991/2 so here we do have twenty year old Dysons. (You can tell the very first machines because they were called DDC, not the DC01 they were later renamed) (Rumbelows went out of business in the mid ninties)
          When introduced it cost £200, twice the cost of other upright cleaners. There was no TV advertising but we sold huge numbers. Word of mouth is the biggest selling point for Dyson, and still is.
          Another retailer I worked for used a Dyson to clean its 20,000 square foot superstore every day. We had a Hoover The One (terrible copy of the Dyson) returned by a customer and started to use that. It literally fell apart after a month or so and had to be thrown out while the Dyson just kept on going.
          Maybe you missed my comment about other manufacturers copying the hose design off Dyson’s prototype but beating him to market? james Dyson tried for ten years to get a manufacturer to licence his design. Phantom in the US looked at his prototype and just stole it. They only signed a licence agreement years later to settle a court case that Dyson started. That licence money helped Dyson finance his own factory so he could start building his machines himself. Many features you believe existed before Dyson were actually Dyson innovations. It just took ten years for the Dyson to appear, making many to think Dyson copied others like Phantom.
          So yes, there were no upright cleaners with a built in hose before Dyson designed it into his prototype. It just took Dyson ten years to start building his machines.
          At the time the Dyson was launched it was years ahead of the competition. There were machines from top manufacturers that if you got a blockage in certain places you had to call out an engineer, they were so badly designed that getting to the blockage was almost impossible. Dyson designed his machines to come apart in seconds so any blockage could be removed in seconds.
          The Dyson “wand”, where the handle comes away and the hose automatically follows, is still years ahead of anyone else, where you have to remove a wand then unclip a hose and connect it yourself before you can use it.
          Other manufacturers have been catching up, as Dysons patents expire and they can copy features, but the Dyson machine is still the best upright.

          As for “lots of reconditioned machines being available means they are bad”, remember Dyson have a five year warranty and, like Apple, they often just give customers a new machine under warranty. They will then fix a simple fault and sell the machine as reconditioned. The sheer numbers of Dysons sold, something I saw first hand, makes the numbers of recon’s actually very reasonable. The last store I worked in got Dysons delivered by the pallet a couple of times a week. Another manufacturer bought out a new machine, with lots of TV advertising, and we got twenty. A month later we still had 19 of the original delivery sitting in the stock room. They were reduced to half price and then reduced even more to clear them. We’d sell 19 Dysons in a day.
          That is why there are so many Dyson refurb’s available. Sheer numbers of new ones sold.
          (The Dyson trade in was £100 off, nearly $200. The company had to send out a memo forbidding staff from helping themselves to the traded in Dysons since so many people were taking them home. That’s where I got my DC14, before the memo…)

          I actually made more commission selling Miele cylinder cleaners, and made lots of commission selling Miele bags as well. And they are very good cleaners. I have a Miele washing machine and they are the best by far. I was actually very disappointed in Miele here in the UK for running very anti Dyson advertising. I felt it cheapened Miele. BMW don’t slag off Mercedes after all. Hoover as well were very dismissive and claimed Dyson were nothing but a gimmick.
          Panasonic got my respect for saying “Yes, the Dyson is good and we have to pull our finger out” and the basic Panasonic bagged cleaner is an excellent machine for the money and what I had at home, and still have as a second cleaner.

          My own Dyson is a DC14 I got free, so I certainly don’t have buyers remorse and I got it after having used every make of cleaner for many, many years. They are great. Can’t say I think as highly about his fans. That’s aircon money for just a fan.

          • Costner says:

            “I live and work in the UK, not the USA.”

            My apologies – I made an incorrect assumption.

            “Word of mouth is the biggest selling point for Dyson, and still is.”

            I can’t speak for the UK, but I disagree that is the case here. Dyson only became popular after his massive ad campaign where he bragged about things working properly. The same holds true with his “bladeless fan” and people thought they were amazing, yet comparable products had been around for years that were practically identical.

            As far as vacuums, Dyson licensed his cyclon technology to another company in the US before he started selling vacs here, but they were never all that popular. They performed just as well as any Dyson does, but they lacked the flashy bright plastics and the neverending barrage of commercials.

            “Maybe you missed my comment about other manufacturers copying the hose design off Dyson’s prototype but beating him to market?”

            I didn’t miss it – I just don’t beleive it. Uprights have had hoses for almost as long as I can remember long before Dyson was ever heard of. I’m going to need to see a source for this claim before I can give it any credibility.

            “Many features you believe existed before Dyson were actually Dyson innovations.”

            Source? Patent numbers? Aside from the concept of putting a vacuum on a giant ball or using cyclonic technology I don’t see any innovative features on a Dyson.

            “The Dyson “wand”, where the handle comes away and the hose automatically follows, is still years ahead of anyone else, where you have to remove a wand then unclip a hose and connect it yourself before you can use it.”

            Apparently you haven’t tried the LG Kompressor vacs. I happen to own a Hoover that allows me to grap one handle and it is a want connected to the hose. The advantage is the hose originates at the bottom so I can pull the vacuum around with me and it won’t tip over. I happen to know Dyson’s can be a little top heavy if you aren’t careful with the wand design, so I would hardly call this light years ahead of the others. There is probably a good reason everyone else haven’t copied his design.

            “Other manufacturers have been catching up, as Dysons patents expire and they can copy features, but the Dyson machine is still the best upright.”

            You opinion is duly noted, but I’ll continue to trust independent testing from a reputable organization like Consumer Reports which shows time and time again that Dyson’s are mediocre at best.

            “As for “lots of reconditioned machines being available means they are bad”, remember Dyson have a five year warranty and, like Apple, they often just give customers a new machine under warranty. They will then fix a simple fault and sell the machine as reconditioned.”

            A lot of other manufacturers offer five year warranties. Even Hoover does on several of their models, and Meile has for decades. I still don’t see refurbed Hoovers for sale at Best Buy. Also, unless it is a major issue, Dyson doesn’t just send new replacements as you should know if you sold them. They first try to send parts the owner can swap themselves, and next they will suggest taking it to a service center. If the repair hits a financial threshold then they will replace it and return the old unit to their central service center.

            “The sheer numbers of Dysons sold, something I saw first hand, makes the numbers of recon’s actually very reasonable.”

            I won’t speak for the UK, but here in the US Dyson still does not sell more units than the other brands (although they have the largest sales in terms of profit). Thus there is no basis for the number of refurbs they have available at any given point. If I want a Hoover refurb on a current model I might find one somewhere, but most likely it will be limited availability or it will come from Hoover’s website. Same thing for Dirt Devil or Eureka or LG. If I want a refurbed current generation Dyson, there are a few dozen websites to choose from including Woot at least three times a month (and twice during every Woot-off) and a half dozen other websites including Amazon, Overstock, Home Depot, and Buy.com.

            I don’t doubt that Dyson sells well – that is indisputable, but I also believe it has to do with marketing and not quality or innovation.

            • zz9 says:

              Re the fan, I agree it is a lot of money for something that doesn’t do anything more than a normal fan. Here it is aircon money for a fan. I’d be happy if someone gave me one but I wouldn’t buy one.
              Dyson didn’t “licence” his tech to people like Phantom, they stole it. He demonstrated his prototype, they looked at it and said no. Six months later they launched their almost identical copy. Dyson sued and eventually they signed a licencing deal to settle.

              As for hoses on an upright the Dyson came out in 1993 (I checked, and was wrong when I said 1991/2. So you were correct, they were not twenty years old) . He had been demonstrating his prototype for nearly ten years before that. Prior to that there were one or two uprights that came with a hose, but it was totally detached and you had to plug it into a slot on the base to use it, after getting it out of the cupboard where you kept it. The first integral hoses on uprights came out by manufacturers that had seen the Dyson prototype and copied that.

              As for innovative features you really had to deal with machines every day, day in day out, selling them and helping customers who bought “faulty” machines back to the store to appreciate just how revolutionary Dysons were. I have fixed many machines that took half an hour to clear a blockage, or where a belt needed superhuman strength to fit using only the tips of your fingers because the design was so awkward. Machines where the hoses fell off in use because they were only held together by friction, cases, hinges and handles that cracked because of cheap plastic and bad design. Wheels that fell off and so on.
              We used a Dyson to clean a huge superstore every day and the thing just went on and on when other machines, like the Hoover, fell apart after weeks.
              Dysons are great in the “use the hose and the cleaner follows you” aspect. It is some other brands where the machine will topple over the moment you try to pull it. The LG is a good cleaner, but still not as easy to use as the Dyson. I can empty my Dyson and put the bin back on one handed in a couple of seconds. I have never seen another make as easy and quick to do that.
              Here Dyson do not have any service centres. They will send out a part if that will fix it, and thanks to the Dyson design most parts are easy for the user to replace, or failing that all machines are collected and taken back to Dyson themselves.
              Working in the trade I know that Monster are crap, Bose are okay but expensive, Apple are expensive and locked down and so on. But Dysons are genuinely great machines, and compared to what was around before everyone else started copying Dyson, even before Dyson reached the market, they were revolutionary, and still lead the field.
              And I say this as someone who will insist that Miele are by far the best washing machine. Mine is well over ten years old now, probably over fifteen years, and still going strong with not a single problem in all the time I have had it.

  17. The_Fuzz_53 says:

    * Was on the sales floor.

  18. Latentius says:

    Oh look, yet another situation where someone encounters the slightest of difficulties, then throws a huge fit about it. And of course, since it involves Best Buy, Consumerist just HAS to post it because they get off on such stories.

    Seriously people, grow up. If the order hasn’t gone through, it hasn’t gone through. Don’t expect things to be perfect to the exact minute.

    I wonder of the OP, if they order a pizza and it doesn’t arrive within 30 minutes EXACTLY, do they throw it in the driver’s face and place an order at another pizzeria?

  19. sonicdivx says:

    I guess my Best Buy is a bit better than most (White Marsh, MD) I have had very few issues. I have bought many appliances and even a Dyson ( I wanted the Eureka, but…. ) a Macbook Pro and more. Though I generally only buy things that are well priced (sale or no real discount – Apple ) and still compare to online. Sometimes shipping costs just don’t make it worth it to buy online. Couple that with their rewards, though not great, and BB can be a worthwhile endeavour.

  20. glitterpig says:

    I really don’t understand why Best Buy has the online-order, in-store-pickup option – I tried it and got to the store three hours later, and my order still wasn’t ready. Yes, for something that was in stock – I walked to the back of the store and got it myself. At least it only took two phone calls and an email to get the online order cancelled, and I got all the appropriate emails. Has anyone ever done this successfully?

  21. mariospants says:

    “Derby party”… is that what they’re calling Cinco de Mayo these days?

  22. mariospants says:

    “Derby party”… is that what they’re calling Cinco de Mayo these days?