Report: Recalled Products From Meijer Pop Up For Sale Elsewhere

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says products that were already recalled from Meijer stores where they were sold exclusively were then sold at discount retailers, dollar stores, liquidation forms, flea markets and thrift stores around the country. Yikes.

According to the CPSCsite (via Consumer Reports), it is illegal to resell or even try to resell any consumer product that has been recalled. The companies whose products were involved complied with the original recall.

The CPSC warns anyone using the recalled products to immediately stop using them, as at least one poses a serious safety hazard, and contact the company.

The list includes the below eight products:

360,000 Innovage Discovery Kids Animated Marine and Safari Lamps: A defect in the lamp’s circuit board can cause an electrical short, posing a fire and burn hazard (Black lamps not included in recall). Recalled Feb. 9, 2010. For more call Innovage at 888-232-1535 or visit lamprecall.org or email info@lamprecall.org.

1 million Infantino SlingRider Baby Slings: The slings pose a suffocation hazard to infants younger than four months old. Recalled March 24, 2010. For more call Infantino at 866-860-1361 or visit infantino.com.

108,000 Hoover WindTunnel T-Series Bagless Upright Vacuum Cleaners with Cord Rewind: The power cord is not properly routed or securely seated in the cord rewind assembly allowing the power cord to be pulled loose, posing a fire and shock hazard. Recalled May 27, 2010. For more call Hoover at 888-891-2054 or visit hoover.com/tseriesrewindrecall.

2.9 million Fisher-Price Ocean Wonders Kick & Crawl Aquarium (H8094): The valve of the inflatable ball can come off, posing a choking hazard. Recalled Sept. 30, 2010. For more call Fisher-Price at 80032-5437 or visit service.mattel.com.

120,000 Fisher-Price Little People Wheelies Stand ‘n Play Rampway: The wheels on the purple and the green cars can come off, posing a choking hazard to young children. Recalled Sept. 30, 2010. For more call Fisher-Price at 800-432-5437 or visit hoover.com/tseriesrewindrecall.

7.2 million Fisher-Price Barbie Tough Trikes model M5727 and Kawasaki Tough Trikes model N6021: A child can strike, sit or fall on the protruding plastic ignition key causing injury. Recalled Sept. 30, 2010. For more call Fisher-Price at 800-432-5437 or visit hoover.com/tseriesrewindrecall.

34,000 Munchkin Bathtub Subs: The intake valve on the bottom of the toy can suck up loose skin, posing laceration hazard. Recalled Oct. 18, 2010. For more call Munchkin at 877-242-3134 or visit munchkin.com.

37,000 Sassy Refreshing Rings Infant Teethers/Rattles: Small pieces of the plastic ball can detach as a result of children chewing on the teether/rattle, posing an ingestion hazard. Recalled Jan. 31, 2011. For more call Sassy at 800-323-6336 or visit sassybaby.com.

Recalled Products Originally SOld By Meijer Found to Have Been Resold By Discounters After Recall Date [CPSC]
Retailers selling recalled products previously for sale at Meijer [Consumer Reports]

Comments

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  1. Cat says:

    Will someone be investigating who sold these products to other retailers? And what is the penalty when they discover who did it?

  2. Blueskylaw says:

    I’ll take everything they have for a quarter a piece. Just don’t ask me what I plan on doing with that jun… err, treasure or I might have to get medieval on your as*.

    • Cat says:

      My truck is parked outside. Are you packed for your vacation in Cancun?

      • Blueskylaw says:

        I bought Cancun with the money I made on the deal. This would be the equivalent of buying 10,000,000 shares of stock for a quarter a share and selling it later for $5-$10 a share.

  3. quail says:

    It’s the foreign manufacturer more than likely. They found themselves sitting on a ton of stuff the original company wouldn’t take so they sold it to others. There’s probably a web of middlemen in half a dozen foreign countries responsible for this.

    • Kuri says:

      And they have likely been doing it for years.

    • lovemypets00 - You'll need to forgive me, my social filter has cracked. says:

      I vote for this option. Meijer probably found out about the dangers, canceled the production and wouldn’t accept it into their supply chain. Off shore factories just shopped the stuff out to others and it’s finally showing up here.

  4. Lexasaurus says:

    I really hope Meijer didn’t have anything to do with this. It seems like someone must have been selling these items out the back door, either at Meijer or whereever they decided to dispose of them.

    I’m a huge fan of Meijer. You can get anything you need at a decent price, and they aren’t anti-union. When I moved away from the midwest for a while, I missed Meijer a lot. But if they keep doing dodgy things like this (not to mention the time they got caught bribing public officials in Michigan), I might have to re-assess.

    • drbtx1 says:

      They were pretty anti-union when I worked there in ’96. Don’t know if things have changed since then. Of course I was a lot more pro-union myself back then.

      • Kuri says:

        Things have changed. When I worked there a few years ago has indeed unionized. They likely realized it wouldn’t kill their company.

        • drbtx1 says:

          Grocery was unionized in those days, but the rest of store wasn’t. We got regular talks on the evils of unions. This store was one of the first stores in Indiana, I think some of the other states were completely union. I met Fred Meijer shortly after the store opened; he seemed like a decent guy for the most part, but he really didn’t believe in paying a living wage.

    • Theoncomingstorm says:

      Thanks, now that I know Meijer isn’t anti-union, I’ll be sure to NEVER shop there.

    • neilb says:

      I agree. I like Meijer for many reasons. They are always on top of consumer issues and make decisions that are genuinely good for consumers. They don’t cheap out (like Walmart does) when it has a negative impact on consumers. I sure hope the company is blameless in this.

    • GrandizerGo says:

      Quote “But if they keep doing dodgy things like this (not to mention the time they got caught bribing public officials in Michigan), I might have to re-assess.” Unquote.

      This makes me laugh so hard… So how many dodgy and illegal things does a company have to do for you to “reassess” your opinion of them????
      So they are now at 2, from your examples above only, maybe 3 if they had anything to do with the OP story.
      Although I would increase that by a lot for EACH and EVERY item they let be sold instead of recalled as they should have.

  5. Bagumpity says:

    Never (NEVER!!!) buy food or any other product designed to be ingested by a human being (or pet) at a dollar store. Don’t do it. Don’t.

    Also, if you see something at a dollar store with a mainstream product logo on it, you can safely assume that it is seized counterfeit goods. Those Gucci sunglasses at the “Everything’s a Buck (and up!)” store aren’t overruns or seconds.

    • Cat says:

      Citation(s)?

      I can buy some of the exact same foods at the dollar stores as are sold at Wal-mart and Kroger. EXACT. SAME.THING.

      I agree your Gucci sunglasses are counterfeit, but then, if you don’t know that already…

      • Yomiko says:

        It’s the same thing, but it may not have been handled properly between the manufacturer and the shelf. I would say that if you stick to canned goods and you 1) inspect the can for punctures or signs of botulism and 2) wash the can before opening it, you should be fine. Other things, I would avoid and that’s because I do have some exposure to… let’s say “alternately sourced” food products.

    • Kuri says:

      I get food from the Dollar Tree all the time and nothing is ever wrong with it.

  6. Murph1908 says:

    I once read (here maybe?) that items salvaged from fires/floods/etc at major retailers end up being sold at Big Lots and the like.

  7. caradrake says:

    Hmm, this reminds me of when a Walmart-branded office chair was recalled due to the chair falling apart when sat in. A weekish after the recall, we went to a local “salvage” store, and they had pallets of the chairs – and each one had huge “recall”s written in permanent marker on it.

    Always wondered how that happened.

  8. jrwn says:

    Where can I buy these from again?

  9. Snoofin says:

    This is one of the reasons I will NEVER shop at a dollar store or those places that buy old stuff from other stores and then resell it like the dented and scratched cans of food. All they sell is outdated stuff and expired or nearly expired food. I dont know how its even legal.

  10. Eater of Worlds says:

    If you shop at Meijer, you support the animal mill industry. You hear about puppy and kitten mills all the time but the small animal mills are just as bad, if not worse. Meijer also, in general, does a poor job of caring for the animals once they are in the store. So many reports to animal control that Meijer corporate just ignores, pretty much.

    • brinks says:

      My local Meijer stores have no small animals, just fish. I would have sent some hate mail if they had anything else. I LOVE Meijer, but that’s unacceptable to me. I will gladly send hate mail if you tell me which area Meijer is selling live animals in.

    • Kuri says:

      I haven’t seen a Meijer selling small animals or birds in the last ten years. Even the one I shopped at as a kid doesn’t do it.

  11. gman863 says:

    My guess is B(redacted)g L(redacted)ts and “salvage” stores like H(redacted)’s in MS and AL.

    Speaking of Hudson Salvage, when I lived in Mobile they had a huge major appliance “blowout” with prices “up to 70% off retail”. Everything was sold “as-is”, and all the manufacturer serial #s were ground off or peeled off. I wonder how many idiots who actually bought one suffered a “blowout” of their circuit breaker panel when the appliance was hooked up.

  12. Difdi says:

    A corporation and a criminal conspiracy have certain elements in common. The major difference is that one breaks the law and the other (in theory) does not. Conspiracy charges usually amplify the penalties for the underlying crime.

    So why is it that corporations typically suffer lesser punishments than a lone individual?