Senate Postpones Vote On PIPA

As you may have heard the other day, the Senate was set to vote next Tuesday on the controversial anti-online-piracy Protect IP Act, but after the entire Internet seemed to raise its voice in opposition to the bill — and a number of Senators quickly changed their opinions — that vote has been put aside for the time being.

“In light of recent events, I have decided to postpone Tuesday’s vote” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in a statement issued this morning. No new date has been given for a vote.

In spite of the vote being tabled, Reid insists, “There is no reason that the legitimate issues raised by many about this bill cannot be resolved… Counterfeiting and piracy cost the American economy billions of dollars and thousands of jobs each year, with the movie industry alone supporting over 2.2 million jobs.”

Reid postpones Senate vote on PIPA anti-piracy bill [Chicago Tribune]

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  1. Buckus says:

    Cue the “This is why I pirate…” rants.

    Just to be clear, I do not support stealing, and I do not pirate. I do wish more games had demos, but that doesn’t justify stealing it. And if music/movies are so bad, why are you stealing it? Just wait until it’s in the $1 bin at Walmart.

    • Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

      No demos might not justify stealing it, but shouldn’t it justify being able to return it?

      • MutantMonkey says:

        Not when a game, movie or CD can be easily copied prior to the item being returned

        • agent 47 says:

          So punish law-abiding people for the sins of pirates? How is that not an incentive to just pirate?

          • Mit Long says:

            Law abiding citizens are constantly being punished by the sins of criminals. Crooked salesman? Ripping off a (presumed) innocent. My insurance is more expensive because a certain percent of the population engage in fraud. In a Ponzi scheme the innocent investors take the bath. Taken a step further, say you’re struck by a drunk driver; not only does he cost you your ability to walk, but now you as a taxpayer have to pay for his room and board in prison as well!

            I guess the moral of the story is don’t be a dick for the sake of the human race.

          • Doubting thomas says:

            Retail prices have a company’s losses from shoplifting built in. Does that justify shoplifting?

            People morals seem to turn off if the product is digital and that is a shame. Now you will have to excuse me because the Jailbreak for the Ipad2 is out and I have to get to work on it.

        • Loias supports harsher punishments against corporations says:

          So provide a demo. You get what I’m saying?

        • pop top says:

          So no one should be allowed to return open software because they may have possibly copied it before the return? Is it fair to assume everyone is a criminal?

          • MutantMonkey says:

            They should if, for example, the game were truly broken, i.e. large number of bugs rendering the game nearly unplayable.

            They should not allow returns because you just did not like the game. There are plenty of avenues to research a product like this prior to purchasing.

            The problem comes down to truly differentiating between the two when someone stands in front of you. Retailers have obviously chosen to err on the side of caution.

            My particular issue with this is that I believe this is one of the primary reasons games are allowed to be released in the states that they are. If people were allowed to return these products, and retailers were able to ensure that it was due to quality issues, then games and possibly movies would be better than they currently are.

            It’s easy to site on the consumer side of the fence and say something should be allowed. It’s a little more difficult to put yourself in the position of a business owner dealing with these types of returns and not knowing what the true reason for return is.

        • Happy Tinfoil Cat says:

          Isn’t that what GameFly is for?

  2. Mulva says:

    AKA icing the kicker – way to play dirty, Reid.

  3. Phil Keeps It Real [Consumerist] says:

    Senate Postpones Vote On PIPA….*until you forget & they slip it right by ya’.

  4. Sian says:

    “Counterfeiting and piracy cost the American economy billions of dollars and thousands of jobs each year”[Citation Needed]

    • ronbo97 says:

      I wonder how much Hollywood has contributed to his re-election coffers.

      I’m also wondering why Congress is getting involved in this in the first place, when our country has more important problems on our plate, such as repairing our roads, bridges and economy.

      Oh, wait…I just reread my first statement. Never mind.

    • Megalomania says:

      the “2.2 million jobs” figure includes well known hollywood insiders such as florists, caterers, and hardware stores. Clearly, were it not for the MPAA, none of them would be able to find work.

  5. pop top says:

    Is there any actual proof (i.e. a credible study from a non-biased source) that actually shows that jobs are being lost by the thousands directly because of the piracy of copyrighted content?

    • Mulva says:
      • Kuri says:

        So if anything, the job loss would happen AFTER SOPA passed, in the form of numerous online retailers and other web based serves shutting down.

    • InsertPithyNicknameHere says:

      Well, the issue was researched by the Government Accountability Office, and they found “Three widely cited U.S. government estimates of economic losses resulting from counterfieting cannot be substantiated due to the absence of underlying studies”, in their report on Intellectual Property in April 2010.

      http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d10423.pdf

      Basically, it’s pretty much impossible to accurately estimate the impact of piracy, by the government’s own admission.

    • jvanbrecht says:

      The reality is, Piracy does more for the industry then against.

      While I do not have citations of specifics, it is somewhat widely know that many of those who pirate music, movies and software, if they like the product enough, will go out and purchase it legitimately.

      The flip side being that those who would not purchase anything they pirated, would also most likely not have purchased the product anyways, so it is not so much that money is lost to pirates, as much as it is additional moneys not made by the content providers.

      • InsertPithyNicknameHere says:

        The government study that I linked below does address this (pages 14-15). They agreed that there can be “potential positive economic effects of counterfeiting and piracy”, and outlined a number of the potential effects. So, there’s some very legitimate citaion of your stance.

  6. kosmo @ The Soap Boxers says:

    Here’s my vote:

    Her dress was OK, but I really don’t understand the comments about how she upstaged Kate. Maybe people glanced at Pipa for a moment, but then they returned their focus to Kate.

  7. InsertPithyNicknameHere says:

    One of the things I find most aggravating about the whole SOPA/PIPA argument from Congress is the numbers they use to argue in favor of these laws. Frankly, there’s no real data to back up these numbers for how much money is lost, and how many jobs are threatened.

    An excellent review of how the numbers are inflated: http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/how-copyright-industries-con-congress/

    SOPA/PIPA is not about helping the overall economy (as Reid has said). It’s about the profitability of a particular set of industries. Because the $15 a person doesn’t spend on the DVD of the latest Alvin & the Chipmunks movie is getting spent elsewhere. It’s not like the money is being taken out of the US economy, it’s just being put into industries that aren’t run by the MPAA and RIAA.

    All of that said, I agree that piracy is wrong and shouldn’t be done. But the impact has been so grossly overstated that it’s hard to support any legislation beyond what already exists.

    • Happy Tinfoil Cat says:

      Is that “Trickle-up” economics?

      • InsertPithyNicknameHere says:

        Oh, we can’t allow the money to only “trickle” up. How will the heads of movie and music studios survive without a gushing flood of money coming in? Won’t somebody think of the billionaires?

    • dolemite says:

      It’s kind of like the “100K” jobs the Keystone Pipeline would generate. Republicans threw that number around with aplomb. Well, a real independent study puts that number closer to 5k, and only for 2 years. Where did the 100K number come from? Well, turns out the oil company published that number.

  8. pythonspam says:

    Mr. Reid, I direct your attention to the fact that the top 10 movies of 2011 grossed $2.5Billion (you know, the ones that everybody is downloading/watching online) and the top 100 grossed almost $9 Billion just in first run theatre tickets. This doesn’t count DVD sales, distribution deals, and merchandise/licensing.
    Hollywood is doing ok.
    http://boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=2011
    By studio:
    WB 20 1,793,828,785
    Par. 11 1,223,453,513
    BV 9 1,091,896,875
    Fox 12 988,052,568
    Sony 12 971,536,789
    Uni. 10 885,970,031

    • nicless says:

      Well then, since that’s your logic I’m going to just take $100 from you because you made $10,000.00 this year and it’s only $100.

      • DariusC says:

        Because overpricing content that costs almost nothing to replicate and sell at full retail price and having your content pirated is the exact same thing as taking money from someone that has (by your perspective) too much. The record industry has no right to tell people what they can and can’t do in their homes on the internet. The only exception I see is if you were coordinating assassinations or finding other ways to hurt people. Nobody is being hurt by piracy, they just make $20 billion instead of $25 billion. They are just angry they aren’t making as much as they think they should. It’s the gap between expectations and reality.

        • nicless says:

          “Because overpricing content that costs almost nothing to replicate and sell at full retail price and having your content pirated is the exact same thing as taking money from someone that has (by your perspective) too much.”

          Those two things have nothing to do with one another. I have something I am selling for $1. You take it without paying. That is stealing. The fact that you think it’s overpriced doesn’t even matter. Of course, I don’t think piracy is a $1 = $1 scenario anyway, I think it makes far less of a dent than that.

          “The record industry has no right to tell people what they can and can’t do in their homes on the internet. The only exception I see is if you were coordinating assassinations or finding other ways to hurt people.”

          If I start coordinating assassinations, you better believe the RIAA is going to tell me to stop. That record industry sure does keep down on the killings.

          “Nobody is being hurt by piracy, they just make $20 billion instead of $25 billion.”

          Well, I’d say a missing $5 billion is going to hurt somebody. Daddy needs to buy a new Huayara.

          “They are just angry they aren’t making as much as they think they should. It’s the gap between expectations and reality.”

          Well, that’s true.

  9. Paul in SF says:

    Darn those pesky citizens demanding to have a say about what laws are passed. Don’t they understand how democracy works?

  10. Kuri says:

    The probably plan to postpone it just long enough for us to hopefully forget.

    We must not forget, nor should we forgive.

  11. deathbecomesme says:

    I need to get me one of those beanie/beard thingies. Thats cool

  12. maruawe says:

    I would feel better that both PIPA and SOPA were canceled …. We will have to keep a close watch on these sneaky B@#@%@%#&’s

    • Jaynor says:

      Closer watch if they cancel them… as they will just add the provisions to other bills like the “fund some schools or something” bill.

      I vote the farm bill for hiding our sneaky screw-the-plebs legislation… have you seen how big that thing is?

  13. vliam says:

    Harry Reid’s still as spineless as ever.

    Make them vote. Enter it into the public record. 1/3 of them are coming up for re-election. Knowing that, I’d like to know who the stupid ones are.