Study Links Increased Life Expectancy For Citizens Of NYC To Anti-Smoking Policies

As if New York City residents need anything else to brag about to the rest of the country, they can now boast a record life expectancy of 80.6 years, which is more than the national rate of 78.2. The city attributes this longer life span in part to its anti-smoking policies.

Bloomberg News quotes the stats in a report released by Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The report says HIV fatalities have also dropped faster than any other cause of death in the city.

“If you want to live longer and healthier than the average American, come to New York City,” Bloomberg said as he released the report. “By investing in health care and continuing to encourage more New Yorkers to take charge of their own health, we’ve experienced dramatic improvements in life expectancy.”

The Health Department said the adult smoking rate for NYC is at a record low, with just 14 out of 100 New Yorkers smoking, a 35% decrease from 2002. Bans on smoking in bars and other public spaces as well as increased taxes on cigarettes likely contributed to the lower number of smokers.

Officials say the decline will prevent 50,000 premature deaths in the next 40 years, and that the reduced smoking has already led to a 4.3% decrease in cancer deaths since 2002.

So according to Mayor Bloomberg, if you want to quit smoking, just move to NYC. It’s that easy!

NYC Life Expectancy Is Seen Linked To Anti-Smoking Policy [Bloomberg]

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  1. majortom1981 says:

    I would think this would also be the case here on long island where smoking in bars and places like that was banned before nyc did it.

  2. Warren - aka The Piddler on the Roof says:

    “Study Links Increased Life Expectancy For Citizens Of NYC To Anti-Smoking Policies”

    So…is this a good thing, or…?

  3. pecan 3.14159265 says:

    Could mostly be the taxes, but Virginia has banned smoking in bars, restaurants, and other public spaces as well. It’s better if no one has to breathe second-hand smoke while in public.

  4. Kuri says:

    Michigan did the same thing. With all the health problems my mom has now, including asthma and a cigarette smoke allergy, thank the gods.

  5. Kuri says:

    I’ll add though, that none of this stops the fucking douchebags who seem to believe that while smoking inside is prohibited, that SOMEHOW makes it ok to smoke RIGHT next to the goddamn entryway where people are walking in and out.

    • Bsamm09 says:

      I smoke and agree with your comment. I always try to keep a good distance. If people walk by, I will put my cigarette behind me and hold my smoke in until they pass and blow it in the opposite direction.

      Just because you can stand beside the door and blow smoke at people doesn’t mean you should. But I do ask that “concerned” citizens keep their “You know smoking is bad and you should quit” comments to themselves. I just tell them I’m trying to make sure I don’t out live my retirement savings and they usually chuckle and walk away.

    • lawnmowerdeth says:

      Please, have some cheese with that whine.

      It’s banned from inside the bar, but now you have to suffer walking past it for three seconds, oh the humanity!

  6. Clyde Barrow says:

    “The city attributes this longer life span in part to its anti-smoking policies.”

    This is pure speculation and cannot be proven. Even calculating and using hypothesis as a “what-if” it would be difficult to prove. Non-smoking venue’s have not been around long enough to show any positive effect as compared to Allowed-smoking venue’s.

    Obviously there is going to be a benefit, but to show an actual increased upper age range? I find that hard to believe.

  7. suez says:

    But couldn’t other factors, like most folks in NYC walk more because they typically don’t have cars, also play a role? While I’m a non-smoker and wholeheartedly approve of smoking bans in buildings, I can’t help but wonder how they can narrow the difference down to one single factor like that.

    • Jane_Gage says:

      I think also the ocean air blows off the exhaust fumes, rather than them puddling like in Camden and making all the kids die of asthma attacks.

  8. suez says:

    But couldn’t other factors, like most folks in NYC walk more because they typically don’t have cars, also play a role? While I’m a non-smoker and wholeheartedly approve of smoking bans in buildings, I can’t help but wonder how they can narrow the difference down to one single factor like that.

    • Brontide says:

      Like the fact that cycling in the city, as transportation, has grown by leaps and bounds in the last decade. The rise can be partially attributed to the city, the genesis for many was the illegal transit strike in 2005. So poor city management caused many to re-evaluate their commuting options.

  9. chiieddy says:

    Hrm. Article is in Bloomberg magazine….

  10. Actionable Mango says:

    New York is kind of crowded; perhaps they should put pro-smoking policies in place.

  11. TasteyCat says:

    If I lived in NYC, I’d want a shorter lifespan.

  12. Mark702 says:

    Studies also show that banning fast food places, soda, and lots of other stuff can increase life span. Let’s have the government tell us we can’t have those things either!

  13. Fantoche_de_Chaussette says:

    The current state of American politics is epitomized by having Bloomberg News trumpet the successes of Mayor Bloomberg.

    Government by, for, and of the billionaires.

  14. Nighthawk Foo says:

    It’s also because cigarettes are prohibitively expensive in NYC. They have the highest taxes on them in the nation, pushing the cost of a pack over $10. There’s a direct correlation between increased cost and decreased consumption.

  15. khooray says:

    Now if they’d just do the same with drinkers…oh wait! Those are the people who hate smokers! That would interfere with THEIR right to drink and drive.
    Personally, I’d rather be around a person smoking than a drunk person.