Study: Some Cereals For Kids Contain More Sugar Than A Twinkie

You wouldn’t feed your kids Twinkies for breakfast (right?), so the news that some cereals aimed at kids have more sugar than those processed yellow bits of foam food is a bit disturbing. As Americans get more obese by the day, a new study warns of the sugary punch packed in many cereals.

Time cites a report by the Environmental Working Group that says in many cereals marketed to kids, one cup of cereal has more sugar than a Twinkie, and many have more of the sweet stuff than three Chips Ahoy cookies.

Part of the problem is that the cereal industry holds itself to its own nutritional standards, allowing cereals marketed to kids to have up to 38% sugar content by weight, compared to the government’s recommendation of no more than 26%.

The EWG looked at nutrition in 84 popular cereals, and the super-sweet results have prompted them to press the government to make mandatory guidelines for sugar content. “Few parents would agree that a cereal that is one-quarter sugar by weight is the best that cereal makers can do for children,” the report says.

Some of the worst offenders include Kellogg’s Honey Smacks; Post Golden Crisp; Kellogg’s Froot Loops Marshmallow; Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s OOPS! All Berries and Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch Original.

For healthier alternatives in big brand names, go for cereals like Kellogg’s Mini-Wheats (frosted or unfrosted); General Mills Cheerios Original; General Mills Kix Original; Quaker Oats Oatmeal Squares Cinnamon and Post Honey Bunches of Oats with Vanilla Bunches.

Children’s Cereal: More Sugar Than a Twinkie? [Time]