Toilet Paper-Plagued Idaho River Finally Flushed Clean

An Idaho truck mishap that left a river clogged with massive rolls of disintegrating, unprocessed toilet paper has finally been cleaned up after weeks of efforts by clean-up crews. The upper Lochsa River was clogged with the waste, foiling sanitation efforts until recently.

The AP reports the crews towed out rolls wrapped with reinforced mesh to completed the efforts.

The truck carrying the toilet paper slid into the river off o U.S. Highway 12. The driver was cited for inattentive driving.

Officials: Idaho river toilet-papered by truck that slid off highway finally mess-free [AP via Washington Post]

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  1. AlteredBeast (blaming the OP one article at a time.) says:

    “The leading brand just disolves in this Idaho river. Charmin Ultra absorbs the river water, leaving your river feeling fresh and clean.”

  2. Thassodar says:

    I guess you could say…

    *puts on monocle*

    That river took the plunge(r).

    NOOOOOOOooooooo…..

  3. iParadox{InLove} says:

    The really sad news is that the TP was headed for a Taco Bell convention but never made it… those poor, poor people! :(

  4. Geekybiker says:

    I guess you could say….

    They wiped out the problem.

  5. Marlin says:

    So, what have you clogged recently with toliet paper?

    /phil

  6. End with a question says:

    Ooops, two typos make it a Phil article :

    1. The AP reports the crews towed out rolls wrapped with reinforced mesh to completed the efforts.
    and
    2. The truck carrying the toilet paper slid into the river off o U.S. Highway 12.

    Does Consumerist have license for AP material or is this near-entire copy of the original article ‘fair use’ ?

  7. DanKelley98 says:

    Ah… Toliet Paper Caper solved!

  8. Foot_Note says:

    *Hoooogggaaaannnnnnn*!(/Klink)

  9. Costner says:

    How long would it take the toilet paper to dissintegrate on its own? I mean most of that stuff totally breaks down after being in water for a few hours, so you would think the river could just flush itself clean (pardon the pun) at least after a few days.

    A little paper pulp in a river isn’t really a huge deal, but I suppose if the toilet paper was all contained in boxes and plastic packaging it could be a big mess.

    • Rachacha says:

      These were huge (approximately 3 feet tall by 6 feet wide) rolls that were likely wound tighter than a standard roll of TP you use at home, so it could take several months for the entire roll to break down.

      Also, the rolls were unprocessed, so I don’t know if there is some additive that is added in the final processing to help break down the paper that was not on these large rolls.

  10. MikeM_inMD says:

    What exactly is “unprocessed toilet-paper”? Why is production started in one place and then finished in another? It’s not like it’s car parts that come from all over to be assembled. It’s *paper*.

    • GuyGuidoEyesSteveDaveâ„¢ says:

      And there are paper mills that produce paper. Do you think jeans are made in the same factory that the denim is? Or that beans are canned at the farm they are picked?