Spa Factory Aromatherapy Kits Continue To Injure People 20 Months After Being Recalled

Last night, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission had to remind folks that it had announced a recall of more than 500,000 Spa Factory Aromatherapy Fountain & Bath Benefits Kits. The reason for the reminder: People are still getting injured when the unvented jar lids go POP!

From the CPSC:

This children’s product was originally recalled in January 2009. Since that time, there have been additional injuries caused by the Spa Factoryâ„¢ Spa Fantasy Aromatherapy Fountain & Bath Benefits Kits. Pressure from the buildup of carbon dioxide in the jars of Bath Bombs/Balls or Bath Fizzies that come with the kits can cause the unvented lids to blow off, posing explosion and projectile hazards. The flying pieces also can cause property damage. Additionally, the mixture of water with the Bath Bombs/Balls or Bath Fizzies can create citric acid. This acid can get into consumers’ eyes when the jars explode, posing a risk of eye irritation.

When the initial recall was announced in Jan. 2009, CPSC had received 88 reports of exploding jars, including 13 injuries to children. In the nearly 20 months since, CPSC has received 12 additional reports of exploding unvented jars of JAKKS’ Bath Bombs/Balls or Bath Fizzies, including 13 additional reported injuries.

“The new injuries include irritated eyes, irritated skin and one eye injury from projectile jar lids,” says the agency’s recall statement.


The kits listed in the chart here were sold at Sam’s Club, Walmart, Target and other stores nationwide from August 2008 through August 2010.

If you still own one of these kits, CPSC says you should “immediately take the toy’s jars and caps away from children and dispose of any jar lids without vent holes. Only use jars that have lids with vent holes.”

Consumers should immediately take the toy’s jars and caps without vent holes away from children, dispose of any jar lids without vent holes and contact JAKKS Pacific to receive free jar lids with vent holes. Contact JAKKS toll-free at (877) 875-2557 between 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday, visit the firm’s website at http://www.myspafactory.com or email the firm at caps@jakks.net

Additional Injuries Prompt JAKKS Pacific® to Reannounce Recall of Spa Factory™ Aromatherapy Kits Due to Explosion and Projectile Hazards [CPSC re-announcement]

JAKKS Pacific® Recalls Spa Factory™ Aromatherapy Kits Due to Explosion and Projectile Hazards [original recall announcement]

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  1. PsiCop says:

    The CPSC’s “reannouncement” poses more questions than it answers.

    If these were recalled in January 2009 — almost two years ago — why are they still being sold in stores? Does a recall mean anything? If stores don’t have to stop selling “recalled” products, then why bother issuing “recalls” at all?

    If, on the other hand, “recalled” items cannot be sold in stores, why is no one in charge of them being prosecuted for having done so? Why have no indictments been handed down, yet?

    The CPSC is either powerless or dysfunctional.

    • Destron says:

      It’s not that their still being sold. Its that people have ignored, or not seen the recall.

      • PsiCop says:

        You may be right, but that’s not how the CPSC reannouncement reads. It says, “JAKKS Pacific® Spa Factoryâ„¢ Spa Fantasy Aromatherapy Fountain & Bath Benefits Kits were sold at Sam’s Club, Walmart, Target and other stores nationwide from August 2008 through August 2010.” As far as I can tell, this means those items were sold from February 2009 through August 2010, which is the period after the recall was issued.

        • Destron says:

          The ones sold after the recall was issued were modified with the vented caps. Just because a product is recalled does not always mean they stop selling it entirely, if the cause of the recall is a simple fix (as was the case here, they just simply had to use different caps) the will modify the product to be safe and keep selling it.

          When I worked in retail and processed recalled merchandise, it was not uncommon for that recall to only include certain UPC’s, LOT numbers, or production dates.

  2. Noadi says:

    Just as a note: the bath bombs are supposed to contain citric acid, that’s why they fizz when put in water because it liquefies the acid and base (usually baking soda) so they combine in a cute grade school science experiment way. The problem is of course that bath bombs are only supposed to fizz, not explode.

  3. Maous says:

    Maybe they should repaint the toy with science-y lookin’ decals, and resell it as a science kit. “Warning, things might explode”=Huge selling point. At least, I would have loved to fiddle around with exploding aromatherapy bottles as a kid. Just provide some goggles.

    (Side note: The goggles? They do nothing.)

  4. daemonaquila says:

    This just gets a big “meh” from me. Take the danged lids to the basement, poke a little hole through them with a drill, and carry on. Cool toys (chem sets, water pressure or black powder battery, powered mini-cars, skateboards, etc.) come with risks. Safety culture has gotten carried away.

  5. Gravitational Eddy says:

    I agree daemonaquila,
    I’m seeing a pattern here about kids and responsibility.
    While this isn’t on par with the Whamco “Bags O’ Glass Shards” fun kit,
    it’s still kinda silly to try and raise concern about “explosive” toy container lids.
    The whole article reads as if an injury lawyer wrote it:
    “Pressure from the buildup of carbon dioxide in the jars of Bath Bombs/Balls or Bath Fizzies that come with the kits can cause the unvented lids to blow off, posing explosion and projectile hazards. The flying pieces also can cause property damage…”
    Come on, “property damage”?
    What, the damn thing can take out a wall or destroy a room with a huge fireball of flame and destruction?
    No?
    Just a little pop?
    And the lid -might- go flying away only to bounce off of someones’s head or body.
    Like those little nerf toys that are still being sold?

    I believe there’s a distinct possibility there’s a personal injury lawyer that has sued this company over a toy that scared a five year old, whose mother then realized the toy she bought her kid -could- possibly pay for that kid’s college education.