Meet The Disposable, Recyclable, Reusable Cardboard Shopping Cart

One great thing about living in a city like New York: Being able to buy just about anything you need. The problem: Getting the things you buy back home. That’s why a designer in the UK has come up with a cart constructed completely out of cardboard that could allow you to wheel your purchases down the street and onto the bus or train.

According to the designer, the Move-It, currently being considered for a Dyson Award, is adjustable to a wide variety of box shapes and sizes. It can safely hold up to around 44 lbs. of cargo.

To use, the customer or store employee takes the flat-packed base/handle of the Move-It and adjusts until the handle is in a comfortable and secure position. The package to be toted is then secured via contact adhesive to the base/handle and a pair of wheels are stuck to the bottom.

The Move-It prototype, constructed entirely from waste materials, was sturdy enough to withstand a 10-mile trip through London while carrying a new microwave.

Watch the Move-It in action here:

Disposable Cardboard Trolley Lets You Walk Home from Ikea [Wired]

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  1. danmac says:

    And then it rained…

  2. NarcolepticGirl says:

    Ridiculous. Doesn’t seem convenient.
    Looks complicated for older consumers.
    Looks ridiculous.

    Might be okay for walking city couriers, I suppose.

    • Daverson says:

      The video mentioned that it would be assembled and attached to the box by the retailer. Why do you think an “older consumer” would find holding a handle “too complicated”?

      • NarcolepticGirl says:

        I don’t have sound here at work – so I was under the impression that someone buys this cardboard thing and sets it up themselves to fit whatever they want it to fit at their home.
        If they buy it from the store – I don’t see why many customers would bring the box they want to us it for and try to carry it into the store. Plus, when they go to use it for something else, they would need to be able to adjust it to fit whatever they’re carrying.

        • Daverson says:

          You still don’t understand how this is designed to be used.

          Let’s say you’ve just bought a microwave – or something else that comes already packaged in a large, unwieldy box. After your purchase, the store clerk attaches this recyclable corrugate handle along with two recyclable wheels, also made of heavy cardboard. It’s simply a handle-and-wheel kit, very inexpensive to produce and distribute to stores, which is designed to be used once and then recycled with other corrugate.

          The box isn’t included. No confused geezer has to figure out how to assemble it. You don’t use it a million times. It’s not a permanent or durable replacement for a hand truck or wheeled grocery trolley. See?

      • NarcolepticGirl says:

        I am realizing by “the store” they probably mean that the guy wants to sell his product to retail stores for them to use for their customers.
        But if it’s designed/adjusted to fit a specific package, I’m guessing you would have to figure out how to readjust it on your own in order to “re-use” it. … which may be difficult for older people.

  3. DariusC says:

    One Word: Ghetto

    Another Word: Cool!

    • DariusC says:

      Oh, and also, this is probably more useful for getting all of your groceries from your car to your apartment or perhaps bringing stuff to a party, gathering, etc.

  4. dustindmw says:

    I bet it works great… in 100% ideal conditions. What the fuck you gonna do if it starts raining

  5. pantheonoutcast says:

    Or you can buy one of these:

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ1xqd/R-202204471/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    It is a one time-purchase, has almost 4 times the weight carrying capacity, is easily 100 times stronger, takes up almost no storage space when folded, doesn’t take 10 minutes to set up or involve gluing wheels into place, and creates absolutely no waste since it is never discarded.

    • energynotsaved says:

      I don’t really understand the idea of the cardboard box on wheels. The above referenced Home Depot item does seem more practicle. I live in a house in the burbs, but if I didn’t have the one that carries 600 ibs (and doesn’t fold), I’d be tempted to get this!

      • cybrczch says:

        I’m not going to take the HD cart with me if I’m only expecting to buy a single tote bag of spring greens (or box of Twinkies). But if I see organic pomegranate juice (or Mountain Dew) on sale, it’s nice to have the option of getting one of the cardboard carts at the store to tote a case home.

    • Tarceinus says:

      I think the idea is that retailers could buy these in bulk and offer them to customers for a convenience charge. If I decide to buy a heavyish box on a whim, I could see spending a few dollars to make walking to a bus stop/subway platform easier.

    • brinks says:

      Yeah, but then you won’t look homeless.

    • HogwartsProfessor says:

      I use one of those at work. I LOVE IT. No more tennis elbow from picking up crates of copy paper!

    • Conformist138 says:

      You are correct in much of what you said, but I will take issue with your “no waste” statement. It is a very narrow, almost to the point of absurdity, view to say only discarding an item counts as waste. The cardboard one is made from recycled materials and looks simple to manufacture, so there’s more to it than just reusability (though I agree it is nice to not purchase the same thing over and over if you need it often).

      I would still prefer your suggestion just because, in Portland, it rains a lot. A lot a lot. A cardboard wheel would be soggy as Wheaties in a bowl of milk in about 5 minutes.

  6. Woofer says:

    Reminds me of soap box derby racers

  7. smo0 says:

    Where cardboard boxes can hold a lot…. (I used to move around quite a bit and had the same boxes for years) it just seems that if you’re outdoors with this…. you expose it to more of the elements…

    namely…. water.

  8. Marshmelly says:

    Its a neat idea (and I don’t think it looks ridiculous at all)…but you would probably get some stares trying to assemble this thing in a store or outside somewhere…since you can’t really assemble it without the box. And then you have to throw it out anyway. I think a very light collapsible handcart would be more efficient. Is it really compact before being unwrapped? If so, it could prove useful for situations where you’re not completely sure if you’re going to make a large purchase or not…or don’t want to be dragging along a handcart before buying the product.

    • Marshmelly says:

      oops missed the part about being assembled/attached by the retailer…thought the consumer did it.

      • NarcolepticGirl says:

        I don’t understand the store setting it up for you…

        So basically, you have to carry the box into the store – so they can set it up to carry the box that you just carried into the store.
        And if you want to re-use it, do you have to take it back to the store to have the employees adjust it to accommodate everything you use it for?

        • NarcolepticGirl says:

          unless the guy is trying to sell them to actual stores – so all the stores can use it (like plastic bags).

          • brinks says:

            You know how staffing is in retail stores these days. You buy it, you’re on your own. No one has time to assemble this for you.

        • MaliBoo Radley says:

          I don’t think you understand how this works. Imagine you got to a shop and buy a new stereo. It comes in a box. The store would attach this to the box that the stereo comes in. You then roll it out of the store.

  9. Daverson says:

    These are designed as quick, recyclable solutions to the problem of lugging a heavy boxed purchase home. Like if you bought a microwave or something. It’s not designed to be reused ad infinitum in all sorts of weather.

  10. aloria says:

    They have things like granny carts and hand trucks, yanno. I hear they are also good for toting large items home, and have the benefit of being reusable for years.

  11. James says:

    That looks extremely cumbersome and unweildy. I live downtown (Denver) and see plenty of folks, mostly older using those wire wheeled baskets where you can plunk in one or two big bags.

    http://www.amazon.com/Mini-Folding-Grocery-Cart-White/dp/B000Z2IRVW

    Seems to work great for them, and when I’m too old to bike and stock up the panniers I’ll probably use them too.

  12. Rectilinear Propagation says:

    http://www.amazon.com/Jumbo-Folding-Shopping-Cart-Black/dp/B0000UZ57S/ref=pd_sim_dbs_bt_4

    I have this cart in blue. It has a canvas liner.

    Since you’re going to be reusing the thing a lot I don’t think cardboard is a good idea. Sure it survived that one trip but if you think no one is ever going to kick your cart, lean on it, crash into it, etc. then you’re kidding yourself.

    I can see someone using the cardboard one if they only need it for say a week but for long term use I think a metal cart is the way to go.

  13. theirishscion says:

    Actually, this is an excellent idea if it can be made cheaply enough. I lived without a car in Edinburgh for a couple of years in the mid 90s and lugging big boxes around was a huge PITA. If I could have paid 5 pounds for one of these rather than ten pounds for a taxi, it’d have been well worthwhile. I have a handy little telescoping/folding portable dolly now as well, which would work well but lacks the massive convenience this would offer. Totally excellent idea anyway.

  14. TerpBE says:

    Finally the homeless will no longer be denied their own Winnebago.

  15. brinks says:

    If it’s cheap enough, it would be convenient as a one-time use item for those of us that take the bus or walk. I’d say I feel stupid carting around a big cardboard box, but there’s already so much of a stigma attached to those of us that ride the bus where I live that it hardly matters.

    Really, though, if you find yourself needing something like this more than a few times a year, they sell collapsible carts for this very purpose.

  16. AuntieMaim says:

    This is brilliant. It seems designed for the store to affix to your box at purchase, not for the customer to bring along and apply: a quick solution that can be provided by the store to get your purchase home. It’s clearly not designed for re-use. I definitely see the advantage of reusable grocery trolleys in that respect, but this seems specifically designed for items of unwieldy shape that would be precarious atop a cart and need special taping, bungee cords, etc. I do as much as possible on foot or on my bike, so would love to have access to this. Now they just need to find a way to secure the cardboard trolley to the back of a bike!

    • AuntieMaim says:

      … except I gather (watched the video with the sound off) that it IS reusable. I just suspect it will be used only once by most users.

  17. AuntieMaim says:

    This is brilliant. It seems designed for the store to affix to your box at purchase, not for the customer to bring along and apply: a quick solution that can be provided by the store to get your purchase home. It’s clearly not designed for re-use. I definitely see the advantage of reusable grocery trolleys in that respect, but this seems specifically designed for items of unwieldy shape that would be precarious atop a cart and need special taping, bungee cords, etc. I do as much as possible on foot or on my bike, so would love to have access to this. Now they just need to find a way to secure the cardboard trolley to the back of a bike!

  18. teqjack says:

    Cute, but “… and onto the bus or train.” Nope, at least not a bus. Might fit the handicapped access doors and wheelchair space, but having it would not entitle you to use such.

    And yeah, I would not use it during the eleven months of often-wet conditions.

    For the effort, one-time-use, limited conditions – this is an art concept, not a practical idea. Heck, to drag around a microwave? They come in boxes: carry a few furniture casters in your pocket, with a couple of bungee cords.

  19. JeremieNX says:

    Um… so this is yet one more disposable product that we can throw away? No thanks…

  20. BytheSea says:

    And this is better than a wire granny cart, why? A cart that is light, can be folded up, can withstand multiple trips and abuse, and hold more than 44 pounds?

    • Bye says:

      I would imagine because even city folks who walk or take public transportation to their local neighborhood stores don’t always know before they leave the house that they’re going to find something that they want to buy.

      We have a good ol’ wire cart, but it’s happened many times that we stop in stores on a walk and find something we’d like to buy but have to go home and come back with a cart or the car.

  21. GreatWhiteNorth says:

    Brilliant.

  22. invisibelle says:

    The mere idea of watching someone like my mom or dad trying to put this thing together is painful.

  23. MaliBoo Radley says:

    This would have come in superhandy when I was living in London. My husband and I didn’t have a car there, as we didn’t really need one. Then came the day we decided to go to the high street and buy a vacuum. It was a two mile walk home trying to carry this 20 pound, awkwardly shaped box. If the shop could have slapped wheels on the thing, it would have been a much easier walk home.