2,000,000+ Drop-Side Cribs Recalled

The CPSC recalled over 2 million drop-side cribs from seven firms today, due to reports of falling and entrapment. The makers are:

Child Craft (out of business), both fixed-side and drop-Side
Delta Enterprise Corp
Evenflo
Jardine Enterprises
LaJobi
Million Dollar Baby
Simmons Juvenile Products Inc

Drop-side cribs have a side rail that moves up and down to make it easier to pick up and put down your baby. However, every drop-side crib that has ever been recalled has been because of a problem with its hardware or durability created an opening where a child could get trapped or asphyxiated.

Here’s a video that explains the dangers more in-depth and how to deal with them.

The CPSC warns not to try to jerry-rig your drop-side crib to fix it. Immobilization devices will be issued in the next few weeks to disable the side rails from moving. However, if your drop-side hardware is damaged or broken, contact the manufacturer for an alternate solution.

Seven Manufacturers Announce Recalls to Repair Cribs to Address Entrapment, Suffocation and Fall Hazards [CPSC]
Seven firms recall 2 million drop-side cribs [Consumer Reports Safety Blog]

Comments

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  1. jrwn says:

    Will all the cribs being recalled, can we just ban them all and be done with it?

    • TuxthePenguin says:

      Ever heard of the Americans with Disabilities Act? Someone stuck in a wheelchair has to be able to get their kids out of a crib somehow…

      • JohnnyP says:

        The drop sides that I have seen I dont think would still be low enough for a person in a wheel chair to reach over.

      • xxmichaelxx says:

        The ADA has absolutely nothing to do with consumer products. Thanks for playing, tho.

      • kujospam says:

        It’s called cut out the legs of the crib. The crib has legs because normal people can use their legs. Disabled people who can’t, won’t need the legs and can then reach down and get the children. Although in my mind I fail to see how a disabled person in a wheelchair can get them either way. If it is a drop side or not.

    • Mr. Pottersquash says:

      i believe a legislator from NY proposed such a solution. It was mocked rentlessly as a waste of resources.

    • keepher says:

      Ban them from coming from China, that should fix the problem.

    • HoJu says:

      Screw that. It’s time to take this shit right to the source.
      Ban babies!!!

  2. Ominous Gamer says:

    Awesome, we’ve been using a Delta dropside for 7 months now.

    Its like playing the freaking lotto!

  3. Verucalise (Est.February2008) says:

    This just reaffirms my decision to get my tubes tied in the next month or so. I have 4 kids without injury so far from recalls– my theoretical next one would not be so lucky according to stats.

    • H3ion says:

      One in every five babies born in the world is Chinese. You’re due.

      • Verucalise (Est.February2008) says:

        Are they born with the ability to make superb sticky rice and sesame chicken? If so, I’m game.

  4. nightshade74 says:

    I own this one –
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml10/10271.html

    Later this year I’m going to need to reassemble it. It’s
    a fixed side ie no moving parts. If all cribs are banned
    where would infants sleep? Do you think that
    any other random place would be safer?

  5. keepher says:

    More China crap being recalled. Hello manufacturers, is it really cheaper to not pay Americans and continually have to recall your cribs?

    I’ve said it before, the drop side crib used for me and my three sibs also held the first grandchild. Nothing fell apart, no openings to cause entrapment and guess where it was made? Certainly not in China. And if you’re struggling with that it was made here in the US.

  6. msbask says:

    I’m just guessing that these things were not made any better 20 years ago, yet 20 years ago I don’t recall a single crib recall, or warning about babies being suffocated when their cribs came apart.

  7. dork says:

    We have a European drop-side crib. (I forget the manufacturer). The drop-side mechanism has metal parts and works flawlessly. I have no qualms putting my kid in it.

    Regulate their design and construction so the cheap ones don’t get sold here if you like. Banning all of them seems excessive to me.

  8. Blackadar says:

    So how do you recall a crib from a company out-of-business? What does someone do with one of those?

  9. Yoya says:

    I have a drop side crib I got with my first child, nothing ever happened. I am going to be using this crib again for my next child. However I have already made modifications to the crib by taking out the drop side equipment and replacing them with space blocks that completely nulls any movement.. The crib is now much sturdier then it originally was.

  10. Moongirl55 says:

    I believe there now is a ban on manufacturing drop-sides (or maybe it’s just that companies finally are shying away from them). It’s an inheriently poor design, even if generations of kiddos managed to survive sleeping in them. It’s the exisiting cribs hanging around out there that are feeing these rolling recalls.

    My concern: I believe all the remedies are repair kits which, in some cases, have been proven not to work very well. Instructions are confusing and sometimes, the repair hardware is as flimsy as the product. Seems the least the CPSC could do is require the manufacturers to authorize dealers to do free professional repairs on site for free, or send technicians to the home. La Jobi did this a couple years ago. Yeah, it’s more expensive for the manufacturers. But shouldn’t that be the price of making killer cribs?

  11. TakingItSeriously is a Technopile says:

    When my wife and I were looking for cribs in 2006 she hated the look of all the drops sides. We ended up with a Mission style crib that re-assembls into a twin size bed. It’s firmly assembled with now moving parts. Guess we dodged a bullet there.

  12. BK31 says:

    We’ve got an alternative version of the drop side crib which I guess could be best described as a swingtop side rail. The top 12″-18″ of one of the side rails is connected to a solidly attached side rail with piano hinge and swings down and out so my 5′-2″ wife can easily reach in and pick our son up. When we were looking at cribs 2 years ago it was tons sturdier and frankly looked better to me. Plus the swinging part, when down on the outside of the crib, is well above the height of any toddler standing on the ground so it won’t trap them against a rail or mattress or anything.

    • Eyebrows McGee (now with double the baby!) says:

      Do you have info on the manufacturer/model … or better, a link?

      This 5’2″ mom is pondering getting rid of our drop side but I can’t reach the baby.

  13. BK31 says:

    We’ve got an alternative version of the drop side crib which I guess could be best described as a swingtop side rail. The top 12″-18″ of one of the side rails is connected to a solidly attached side rail with piano hinge and swings down and out so my 5′-2″ wife can easily reach in and pick our son up. When we were looking at cribs 2 years ago it was tons sturdier and frankly looked better to me. Plus the swinging part, when down on the outside of the crib, is well above the height of any toddler standing on the ground so it won’t trap them against a rail or mattress or anything.

  14. ElizabethD says:

    Sometimes I wonder how our children all survived this long.

    • meske says:

      Sometimes I wonder how I made it to this point. I’m sure this keyboard will be recalled soon, but not before it kills me!

  15. nbs2 says:

    The now-out-of-business ChildCraft appears to be a good reminder that just because it’s fixed side, it isn’t necessarily safe.

    And what’s wrong with using a pack and play instead of a traditional crib?

    • cmdr.sass says:

      Babies outgrow the pack and play very quickly. They need room to roll around.

      • BK31 says:

        Plus when kids can start to stand up many times they can topple them over by leaning on the sidewalls depending on the design of the PnP.

        • nbs2 says:

          Even with a lower center of balance? Certainly the materials may be heavier in a traditional crib, but the mattress in a full size PnP is roughly the same size as a regular crib mattress, so the overall base is roughly the same and the kid should have about as much space to move around in.

  16. demechman says:

    I just built my own crib. Its about as safe as there ever has been of a crib.

  17. demechman says:

    I just built my own crib. Its about as safe as there ever has been of a crib.

  18. esc27 says:

    Looks like rather shoddy designs on these cribs. Plastic parts that pop loose if the crib isn’t kept completely square. If I recall correctly, the (possibly 30 year old) crib my parents used had metal parts and the drop side slid down a pole (that when through the side rather than on the outside edge.)

  19. My Head Hurts says:

    Both of my children slept their infant years in the crib pictured above.