How Not to Take a Holiday Photo “Why didn’t I get my shot? There were a number of things I didn’t dothat would have made this a very memorable shot. So that you don’t suffer the same fate, here’s a short list to check before taking your holiday shots with your digital camera:” [Consumer Reports Electronics]

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  1. dohtem says:

    Why do these posts/alerts/whatever from ConsumerReports.org appear without a title in RSS readers?

    When I go back to look at a person’s comment history, comments in ConsumerReports.org entries appear without a way to click to them.

    What gives?

  2. MDSasquatch says:

    #1 rule for better photographers – get closer to your subjects.

  3. quail says:

    Another good rule, know your equipment. Take the time to know how to operate that new point & shoot. Don’t force friends and family to experience your learning curve.

  4. GuyGuidoEyesSteveDaveâ„¢ says:

    I think I need a better camera, because mine didn’t come out as nice as I would have liked it. I also need to get a green screen for better cutting out of animals.
    http://s165.photobucket.com/albums/u45/gitemstevedave/Christmas%20Card%20Shots/?action=view&current=48639668.png

    http://i165.photobucket.com/albums/u45/gitemstevedave/Christmas%20Card%20Shots/48639668.png

  5. pecan 3.14159265 says:

    Do not look to Awkward Family Photos for photography advice.

    Get closer to your subjects, make sure everyone is wearing a compatible color palatte (no day-glo yellows, please!), and make sure everyone is grouped. You don’t want that one person who is taller than everyone else sticking out of the group like the Statue of Liberty. Have that person sitting with some other tall people, then have the shorter people behind them.

    Have parents hold children. Hands in front of faces is the most common tactic children use to destroy a good photo. Have parents anchor their children, and if they don’t smile, they don’t smile. But by god, people, do not sit there and spend 10 minutes trying to get a kid to smile for a photo. That just makes everyone cranky.

  6. Skipweasel says:

    The most important thing I ever learned about taking decent photos is not to the put the subject in the middle. Humans naturally look at the subject’s eyes so we tend to put them in the middle of the frame – but when you look at the result it (mostly) looks horrid. Read up on the rule of thirds.

  7. LogicalOne says:

    Too bad the photographer didn’t think to take more than one shot of the Consumerist.com team members. Then there’d have been a better selection to choose from.

  8. Rectilinear Propagation says:

    Someone posted a link to a really awesome tutorial site for photography in the forums a while back. The forum is currently down and I didn’t bookmark it but if someone remembers the site a link to it would be both appropo and appreciated.

  9. Applekid ┬──┬ ノ( ゜-゜ノ) says:

    I’m not sure and… and… and correct me if I’m wrong but I think I see … a nipple.

  10. Munchie says:

    Very happy with the Sony TX-1 I just purchased. First camera I have owned with good low light sensitivity / scene detection. Little low on the battery life though.

  11. Keep talking...I'm listening says:

    I would recommend adding ‘in a restroom stall’ as another ‘How Not to Take a Holiday Photo’

  12. H3ion says:

    1. Crop in the viewfinder so you get the largest usable print.
    2. Don’t try to put film in a digital camera. It can’t be done and it just annoys the camera.

  13. H3ion says:

    Another way to get much better looking pictures is to get much better looking subjects. I often buy a frame just so I can get a photo of the family in the frame.