My Bank Refused To Believe I Was A Person

Inspired by the tale of a couple whose Wachovia checking account was frozen for a month, Loan shares a similar tale.

It seems Wachovia refused to believe someone with the first name of Loan could possibly be a person and in fact must be a business. How to sort things out? Account freeze! Loan writes:

I opened an account in 2007 with Wachovia because they had a very attractive APY for their savings account. It worked the same way as Bank of America’s keep the change program, but instead of 0.25 APY, Wachovia offered 5.00% APY with a 100% match for the first 3 months the account was open. I had my account open for about 2 months before it was frozen.

I called customer service daily, then multiple times daily, only for the service representative to tell me, “We are currently looking into why your funds are unavailable to you. At this time, we do not have information as to why. Someone will be contacting you in regards to this matter.”

Nearly 2 weeks later, someone from corporate called to tell me that my account was incorrectly opened as a personal account instead of a business account. The transactions made on the account were not of “business” nature, and Wachovia wanted me to convert my account to a personal account, but needed my information. You see, my name is Loan Co. The new accounts auditors at the corporate office mistook me, a person, as a business. I tried to explain to this person out in Virginia that the information in the computer system was indeed for a person, but they would not release my money to me until I could prove that I was a human being.

In order for me get my funds unfrozen, I had to send a notarized letter from the social security office that I was indeed a person and that the social security number I provided was a SSN# not a EIN for a business, along with a notarized copy of my driver license.

It was such a hassle, and the second I had access to my funds, I closed the account.

The great thing about mattresses is they lack the ability to freeze your funds.

But in all seriousness, what measures do you take to diversify your liquid cash so one account freeze can’t knock you out?

Comments

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  1. Anathema777 says:

    This sounds like some kind of urban legend I would get in an email forward from my grandmother…

  2. Smashville says:

    Call me a skeptic or whatever…

    But I don’t believe this story. Someone’s parents named them Loan Co? Seriously?

    • h3llc4t, breaker of office dress codes says:

      Maybe they changed their name to that intentionally? People do wacky things with their names for odd reasons. The boy was obsessed with a movement where you changed yourself into a corporation to get back the money you gave to Social Security or some such nonsense…I think that involved a name change. (If it’s an ethnic name and I’m just an insensitive idiot, please forgive me.)
      I’m riding the “blame the OP” line here, but with a name that unusual it would be prudent to be prepared for such situations and be ready to submit it right off the bat. They shouldn’t have to, but I can absolutely see how the mistake happened.

    • pecan 3.14159265 says:

      @Smashville (11:22) Well, we’re not all Roberts and Kellys you know. Some of us have pretty ethnic names. Loan Co seems like it would be Asian – Laotian, Vietnamese or Filipino. Loan doesn’t have to be pronounced like one typically thinks. It could be “Lo-Ann.”

      • Smashville says:

        I’m extremely aware, as I have a very unusual name…but this name seems a little too unusual for them to be surprised that the bank flagged it.

    • DangerMouth says:

      Seriously? Sounds Vietnamese to me.

      • pecan 3.14159265 says:

        I did a quick search, and Loan is a French name as well. Given the influence of the French in Vietnam, I wouldn’t think Loan as a name is unreasonable.

        • Smashville says:

          Probably more likely to be Filipino or Chinese than anything. But again, it seems almost too Snopes.com to me…and again…just me.

    • Smashville says:

      Also, I should point out that the second part of that sentence is separate from the first.

      The part that really bothers me about this and makes me skeptical is that the bank supposedly waited over 2 months after someone opened account before asking for any form of identification?

    • sleze69 says:

      As much as I dislike Wachovia, can you really blame them? If my name was Best Buy, I am sure that I would have to deal with this from time to time.

    • catastrophegirl chooses not to fly says:

      you said that so i had to go look zabasearch says there are in fact two people named that in their records.

      LOAN B CO
      ……
      FL

      LOAN K CO
      ……
      CA

      • Smashville says:

        Yeah, but even if their name was Steve Smith, wouldn’t they have been required to show identification when opening a bank account? Otherwise, what’s the point of a Cayman Islands offshore holding corporation?

    • tape says:

      You’d probably be quite shocked at some of the names that come out of Southeast Asia, if you think Loan is a particularly odd first name or Co is a particularly odd last name.

  3. Coelacanth says:

    You shouldn’t need to diversify your “liquid cash” to too many different accounts, because that makes it a hassle to manage. One checking, one savings, and perhaps a high-yield online money-market/savings account are enough. The first two are usually with a single bank, so if they freeze one account, they’ll freeze both.

    The online account can also be a hassle, since many require the use of ACH transfers to deposit and withdraw. Besides, if you’re using a high-yield savings account for the maximum return of liquid assets, one is likely to put the vast majority of their spare cash there… so if for any reason *that* account is frozen, the problems could be severe in a financial emergency.

    In all seriouslness, banks should be required to notify the consumer in the event they wish to freeze funds (with the exception a court order), giving the customer to respond.

    • FatLynn says:

      I have a small amount in online savings with a debit card that’s locked away at home. When my wallet was stolen, I was able to access what I needed until other cards were replaced.

  4. MDSasquatch says:

    A friend of mine named her son Hercules & I once had a co-worker’s 1st name was Happy (male).

    I am not blaming the OP, but sometimes, parents need to step back and look at the long-term ramifications of their “cute” choices when naming their offspring.

    Can’t blame the bank on this one.

    • Kitamura says:

      I have to agree, as an individual I’d be pretty skeptical about who claims their name is “Loan Co.”. I can only imagine what a business would think when something like that pops up in their system. There’s probably enough (no necessarily loads, but enough) businesses that try to bypass the system that a name like that automatically raises red flags in the system.

      • pecan 3.14159265 says:

        It’s just Loan Co, no period after “Co” – in the OP’s letter, it says “You see, my name is Loan Co.” with the period at the end to denote the end of a sentence. It’s not part of the person’s name.

        • floraposte says:

          Right. And I doubt it was a cutesy-intended name–it’s more like naming your kids Randy and Fanny and then moving them to Britain, where they’ll be laughed at all the time.

    • korybing says:

      Except that Loan is a perfectly legitimate name in Vietnam. It’s not unreasonable to think that “Loan Co” could be a Vietnamese name, and not parents naming their kid something weird for fun.

    • SudhamayiKabong says:

      I could see that being relevant if his name was Apple Moon or something equally as silly, but Loan Co is most likely a Vietnamese name, rather than the result of the OP’s parents doing too many drugs during the 60’s.

      That you folks seriously seem to think that someone would name their child Loan Co as a lark is beyond mental.

  5. Noir says:

    you could make a reality show about your adventures in the banks OP

  6. PsiCop says:

    I’m with Smashville on this one. I do not believe there is a person whose name is really “Loan Co.” I just don’t.

  7. jamar0303 says:

    As for the name, I’ve seen stranger things. Over here there were people who wanted to name their kid “@”. Yes, the symbol. It was blocked only because there was no reasonable way to write it with Chinese characters.

  8. pecan 3.14159265 says:

    I think it’s interesting that a lot of people think this is a made up name. What if it’s ethnic? If you came from a country in which getting bank loans was not commonplace, or your parents came from a time in which this didn’t exist, how can you anticipate having these kinds of problems? For that matter, how would you go about telling your parents “Sorry, I’m changing the name you gave me and called me from birth because I’m in a different country now, and it seems like my formerly-acceptable birth name is going to cause trouble.”

    • P=mv says:

      It might be ethnic or it could be someone looking for trouble. I don’t care either way.

      The bank should have verified that the number Loan gave them was in fact an SSN and not EIN. If the only thing they were basing this freeze on was his name, the bank is at fault, especially with how long it took to correct the issue and the fact that initial CR reps had no clue what was going on.

      For every bank account I have ever opened I have to provide 2 forms of ID, one has to be picture, verifying that I am who I say I am. If they then look at my name and insist it is the name of a business, the bank is being idiotic.

    • FrugalBDevil says:

      quick search on the white pages:
      Loan Co San Francisco CA View Details
      Loan Co Westminster CA View Details
      Loan Co San Jose CA View Details
      Loan Co Lowell MA View Details

      I took out the middle names, cities and other details . .

      so I don’t really doubt this. I know a lot of people, mostly Asian and African who’s names are really unfortunate when translated to english.

    • She_Goes_to_Eleven says:

      I went to high school with a girl whose last name was “O.” Just one letter. She had the worst time… she was Asian-American with a very American first name. Most things would show up with her last name as “Oh” since many computer systems wouldn’t accept a surname with only one letter, and often “O” would be put in as her first or middle initial and her actual first name would be put in the surname field. I’m sure when she was born, her parents never dreamed these kind of problems would exist at some point in their future.

    • H3ion says:

      They used to do this pretty regularly at Ellis Island. The civil service personnel couldn’t pronounce or spell many of the names of the European immigrants who passed through and, to be fair, a lot of the immigrants were illiterate as well. You’d be amazed at how many people wound up with very Anglicized names.

  9. Murph1908 says:

    I would like to suggest to those thinking inside the box that the OP’s name is likely a name from a country other than yours.

    Would an Anglo name their child Fuk? Probably not, but it doesn’t mean it’s not a popular name in Asia.

  10. duncanblackthorne says:

    @Pecan: Asian people take westernized first names all the time.

    • pecan 3.14159265 says:

      I know they do. I’m one of them. But I did it because I grew up in the US, disliked my Asian name, and my mother gave me a Western name because after some decisions, she realized I was going to be growing up in the US. But this person probably either didn’t want to, or didn’t anticipate it being such a problem. I’d wager that the OP either has profound connections with his or her name, or is older and has spent most of his or her life as Loan. Why should anyone change their name against their will?

  11. d0nkss says:

    I don’t see why some of you think Loan might not be a real name. Co seems like an asian surname and Loan is probably not said as loan as we say it. It is probably said like Lo-an or something of the nature. http://www.all-babynames.com/meaning-of-name-Loan.html.

  12. Android8675 says:

    How are banks able to stay in business? Why hasn’t everyone fled to their local CREDIT UNION yet? Good for her for grabbing her money and running, but damn if these banks don’t make a HUGE turnaround at some point… This just gets me so mad. I know some people have a lot of assets, but if my bank ever got frozen for a month I’d probably go broke from all the bounced auto payments that I have setup on an almost weekly basis.

    You trust someone to keep your money safe, but the problem is they are keeping it safe from you. Fumming…

    • catastrophegirl chooses not to fly says:

      i totally just got my first bingo since the redesign!
      [p.s. - i love my credit union!]

  13. Hoang says:

    Loan Co is a real name, and Vietnamese to boot.

    I say this with my full authority as a certified Asian, I do.

  14. Sarcastikate says:

    Oh, come on. Today’s not April 1st….so WTF????

  15. raven268 says:

    Do business with trustworthy businesses. In consumer finance these days, that usually means credit unions, though be careful of which CU you choose–some are distressingly bank-like. Don’t make your banking decisions on rates alone. Look: you’re not going to make a killing on bank account interest. So don’t try, and don’t be tempted: deals that look too good to be true usually are. Get a decent deal, but also establish a good business relationship.

    This is standard advice from pre-bubble days, which I now realize are nearly two decades ago. It’s still good advice.

    Croak!

    • That's Consumer007 to you says:

      Unfortunately, advice like that (as you admitted, several decades old) doesn’t apply to things that happen after the fact, behind the scenes, and so cosmically stupid as to be impossible to predict ahead of time.

      That’s why sites like this, protection agencies, etc. exist, and consumers need to have a brain and a spine, corporations need to treat them well when they eff up, and make it right, and all of us need to support other consumers like ourselves (no matter how weird their names are, they didn’t choose them), not second guess and armchair quarterback them with sh1t happens.

  16. That's Consumer007 to you says:

    I feel really bad for the consumer here. Once an account is set up correctly (as his originally was), no other processes or people in the bank should be able to close it because they are suspicious morons. Why couldn’t they just look at the card on file with his credentials if they were in doubt instead of HELLO jacking his life up preventing access to HIS money?

    On a slightly unrelated note, when I don’t want a website or business knowing my real name (like when I pay in cash) I like putting down “Nunya Biz”, “Hu Askid Yu” or “Goeh Weigh” as my name, lol. But that is with retail things that don’t matter, not banks where it matters a lot.

  17. profmonster says:

    Co is also a common Phillippine name. I’m glad that Loan got his/her money out of Wachovia. I’m surprised that some people think that Loan should have to take an “American” name. Aren’t we the melting pot nation? If so, let’s *be* the melting pot, and not fuss when people’s names aren’t John and Cindy (or whatever the common names are now….Brittney and Skyler?)

  18. parkj238 says:

    LOL oh man, this one is kind of funny though.

  19. berkeleydad says:

    While this situation for Loan Co is unfortunate, imagine if your name is Gary Danko and tried to open a restaurant in Japan. (Gary Danko is by the way a celebrity chef popular here in the SF/Bay Area and has a restaurant that bears his name).

    With a Japanese pronunciation:
    Gary = diarrhea
    Danko = ball

    My wife and I practically fell over our seats when we first heard this !!!

    • That's Consumer007 to you says:

      Yeah things getting lost in translation are always fun. I was over with some other Americans in London a few years ago meeting with some British coworkers. One of the Irish guys said to one of the American lady workers, meaning that he would knock on her door in time to leave together for a meeting the next morning: “I’ll come around about 7am and knock you up, then.”

      Of course she turned red and the rest of us Americans started howling with laughter.

      The Chevy Nova didn’t sell in Mexico because “no va” mean’s “won’t move” or “won’t go”.

      fun times

      • pecan 3.14159265 says:

        Now THAT is an urban legend. http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp

        The Chevy Nova in fact, sold very well in Mexico and Venezuela.

      • h3llc4t, breaker of office dress codes says:

        Sadly, the Nova thing is an urban legend:
        http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp
        It’s a shame, since it’d be pretty awesome if it were true.

      • Murph1908 says:

        Playing pool with a British friend of mine when I was younger, a similar thing happened. I thought we were having a pretty good time, then all of a sudden he tells me he’s getting pissed. For the Brits, it meant he was getting drunk.

        Lots of little stuff like that, like instead of Solids and Stripes, it’s Spots and Stripes.

        And it was quite entertaining watching the waitress explain to him what a Dorito was.

      • DangerMouth says:

        My partner swears he was having dinner with an Ozzie once and when he was served coffee, asked for it “lighter”. So she puts milk in it and says “no, LIGHTER”. Much hilarity ensued when they figured out he was saying “later”.

    • SudhamayiKabong says:

      It’s Dango, which isn’t exactly a ball per se, but your point still stands.

    • dantsea says:

      When I used to do work for a call center quality assurance outsourcer, a young lady on the roster of one of centers had the first name of Swastika. Yes, Swastika. While we have a very definite image and cultural reference in mind when we hear or read that word, Swastika (or perhaps her parents) were from a part of Asia where that term is still related to something more positive and spiritual.

      I believe she announced her first name as “Katherine” to callers.

  20. randomman says:

    A quick search on http://www.peoplefinders.com (basically a LexisNexus search), reveals at least 6 people names Lean Co in the United States.

  21. howie_in_az says:

    It was such a hassle, and the second I had access to my funds, I closed the account.

    This is the best part of the entire article.

  22. trujunglist says:

    yeah, and you know what, it’s because there’s some sort of stigma behind having a name that might be confusing as in this case or hard to pronounce.
    when I was in high school, there was a new kid coming into my class directly from China. the dude hardly spoke any english and was already faced with incredible challenges; joining a new school with new people that don’t speak the language (and my school was also incredibly small so you can imagine that cliques were very tight), living in a completely different environment (Hong Kong to Tucson), and not even living with his parents (he lived with his aunt). the headmaster, along with his aunt, decided that he would not be called his real name, but rather Vincent, and introduced that concept to us during a homeroom meeting. At the time I wasn’t thinking too much about it since I was probably trying to figure out how to get out of the meeting and ditch class. anyway, finally “Vincent” joined up with us, and we had another homeroom where he was officially introduced to our class (like I said, very small school). the headmaster began speaking and finally she introduced him. he got up and said a few words, like that he was happy to be there and was looking forward to making friends. The headmaster got back up and started talking about “Vincent” again and what she expected from us etc. and instead of listening to her bullshit, I interrupted her. I asked the class if they REALLY thought that Vincent was his name. No, they of course didn’t think that. I asked “Vincent” what his real name was. He spoke up. I asked the class if this was too hard to pronounce, or if it would cause problems for us to call him his real name. Of course not, we weren’t stupid. I asked “Vincent” what he’d prefer; would he rather be called Vincent or his real name? His real name of course! I then asked the headmaster if she had even bothered asking him what he thought, or if she just thought we were too childish or too stupid to be able to deal with someone having a foreign name. My class laughed and began mocking her as we were wont to do in this type of situation.
    to me, name changes to fit the melting pot are very harmful. fuck the melting pot, all that does is blend all the flavors together into some sort of sludgy stew.

    • pecan 3.14159265 says:

      @trujunglist

      See, I see it in an entirely different way. To me, you didn’t even factor that because you didn’t think his name was really Vincent, you were characterizing him as an immigrant who couldn’t possibly have chosen a Western name. No, he has to be Xi Ling, he can’t possibly be a Vincent because he doesn’t look like us or talk like us or anything!

      I’ve changed my name to take out my Asian name because of the problems I had as a kid with people not knowing how to pronounce my Asian name, and because it really was very difficult to be in the US not having the same language skills, not looking like everyone else, and not having the same cultural understanding. I hated every time I was introduced to a class because it was yet another thing that made me seem incredibly foreign, and it would be mispronounced, kids would ask “how come your name is different…” not understanding at such a young age how that seems. It was a small piece of solace the day my mom finally started putting only my Western name down on school forms.

      • saturnleia says:

        Well, in context – he said that the headmaster had already announced to the class that “Vincent” was not the kid’s real name to begin with.

        I have a Western first name even though I was born in Asia – but I have gotten a few people over the years who asked me what my “real” name was. They are taken aback a bit when I inform them that I gave them my real name to begin with.

      • thetroubleis says:

        People also assume my real name isn’t my name and I’m only Black so I don’t know where the hell the shock is coming from. Amanda [Bland English Name] doesn’t seem like it would be surprising on anyone.

        I kid of question why people feel the need to ask people if what they want to be called is their real name.

      • jamar0303 says:

        Which is surprising, because even when I moved to the South no one ever had any problems pronouncing my “Asian” name. And frankly, I couldn’t care less which one people call me by. Both are my “real” name, I won’t hold one over the other. One I use in America or with people who have trouble with pronunciation, the other I use when in China or other Asian countries (currently studying in a Chinese university- even the Yemeni and Bolivian students call me by my “Asian” name) or with Asian people.

        (Aside- The commenter mentioned “Hong Kong”. Canto people don’t have names like “Xi Ling”.)

  23. trujunglist says:

    yeah, and you know what, it’s because there’s some sort of stigma behind having a name that might be confusing as in this case or hard to pronounce.
    when I was in high school, there was a new kid coming into my class directly from China. the dude hardly spoke any english and was already faced with incredible challenges; joining a new school with new people that don’t speak the language (and my school was also incredibly small so you can imagine that cliques were very tight), living in a completely different environment (Hong Kong to Tucson), and not even living with his parents (he lived with his aunt). the headmaster, along with his aunt, decided that he would not be called his real name, but rather Vincent, and introduced that concept to us during a homeroom meeting. At the time I wasn’t thinking too much about it since I was probably trying to figure out how to get out of the meeting and ditch class. anyway, finally “Vincent” joined up with us, and we had another homeroom where he was officially introduced to our class (like I said, very small school). the headmaster began speaking and finally she introduced him. he got up and said a few words, like that he was happy to be there and was looking forward to making friends. The headmaster got back up and started talking about “Vincent” again and what she expected from us etc. and instead of listening to her bullshit, I interrupted her. I asked the class if they REALLY thought that Vincent was his name. No, they of course didn’t think that. I asked “Vincent” what his real name was. He spoke up. I asked the class if this was too hard to pronounce, or if it would cause problems for us to call him his real name. Of course not, we weren’t stupid. I asked “Vincent” what he’d prefer; would he rather be called Vincent or his real name? His real name of course! I then asked the headmaster if she had even bothered asking him what he thought, or if she just thought we were too childish or too stupid to be able to deal with someone having a foreign name. My class laughed and began mocking her as we were wont to do in this type of situation.
    to me, name changes to fit the melting pot are very harmful. fuck the melting pot, all that does is blend all the flavors together into some sort of sludgy stew.

  24. raven268 says:

    I was replying to the question about self-protection & offering general advice on how to choose financial firms. While this particular event wasn’t predictable, bad experiences with untrustworthy businesses are likely: if not this, then eventually something else. Advice doesn’t obviate the need for laws, regulations, social and legal action after the fact, and so on.

  25. SudhamayiKabong says:

    The guy who does the yearly harassment awareness training at my place of employment told us a story about an Australian friend of his. His friend used to come to America every year to participate in a marathon, and he would always tell him that he was rooting for him before the race. Well, after a few years of getting strange looks from his buddy and his wife, he came to find out that “rooting” is Australian slang for having sex. He thought that he had been giving his buddy words of encouragement, when he had essentially been telling him that he was having sex on his behalf for the last few years.

    Ah, how cultural differences can sometimes lead to confusion.

  26. AK47 - Now with longer screen name! says:

    What I don’t get is why the bank’s reaction is to freeze the account immediately because they think it’s the wrong type of account. Unless they suspect fraud, why the hell would they freeze the account? Moreover, why freeze the account with NO contact (pre- or post-freeze) to the account holder?

    The OP says “Wachovia wanted me to convert my account to a personal account, but needed my information” – – but Wachovia never contacted her (him? apologies to the OP!) about this!! She had to contact Wachovia first, and wait 2 weeks for someone to figure out what the hell was going on.

    Ooh, nothing pisses me off more than bank stupidity, especially since it usually means the customer gets screwed for a ridiculous amount of time.

    >:( Now I’m cranky.

  27. mbd says:

    To open an account in 2007, Mr. Loan Co had to provide government issued photo id at that time. As such, something does not seem right in this story, although we don’t have enough info to determine who is in the wrong.

  28. brianguyy says:

    it appears, on the surface, like some Vietnamese names I’ve seen. example, my mother in law’s name is Do, and a lot of English speakers have a hard time understanding it at first when given verbally.

    so just curious, is Loan Co vietnamese or some other SE Asian nationality?

    • missheartme says:

      Well, I’m Chinese-Vietnamese/Filipino. Loan is from my mother’s side, Co is from my father’s side.

  29. brianguyy says:

    anyway, it seems like a bank manager or higher up should have just called them and said “come into the bank within 7 days so we can verify your account or we’ll have to close your account” once the account got “flagged”. they didn’t, they just put it into hyper lockdown without any warning. some way to do business…

  30. missheartme says:

    First, I was suprised that Phil posted my story… so thank you!

    Secondly, reading the comments just kind of proves my point that with my name that people still don’t believe I am a person. It’s just an everyday thing for me… I work in the real estate business, and when I first started at my office, the IT department hassled HR and my manager to show documents that they weren’t making a fake login into their computer systems.

    I had no issues opening my account at the branch because I did have 2 forms of ID, but all the problems started after the fact… I had the same issue with Wamu.

    • Stephmo says:

      There’s an upside – AML (Anti-Money-Laundering) compliance is getting stricter – specifically the regulations governing the “Know Your Customer” portion. So where once upon a time it was okay to do these checks after an account was open, the feds are expecting a ton more due dilligence upfront. (Folks here may have gotten letters the last few months from their banking institutions asking them to clarify their contact information if portions were missing – that’s why.)

      So, when you prove you’re a person upfront, it will be you proving it – not something that gets flagged later.

    • ZeroLovesDnB says:

      Ey grrl!

  31. ZeroLovesDnB says:

    Hey guys,

    Jus’ wanna interject because I’m a personal friend of the OP. Her mom is Chinese and her dad was Filipino. Loan Co is her real name. I LOL’d so hard when I first met her because I found it ridiculous that her name looks like the abbrv. of Loan Company. I was like: “How in the WORLD does someone get a name like that”!? Then I met her mom; totally utterly Chinese, hardly speaks much English at all. With both parents native to other countries, I’m quite confident that they didn’t conjour the possibility.

    Further irony, Loan’s employment specialty is banking and accounting! >.

  32. Difdi says:

    I’m named for both of my grandfathers. My first name and middle name can be either given name or surname in their original ethnicities. Just about every other account (bank, internet, phone, whatever) I open, there’s extensive confusion on the part of the company in question about which name I put in is my surname. Sometimes they read it correctly, other times they see an “obvious” typo and insert a comma between my first name and surname (or delete the comma, depending on how I entered my name). On some of my older accounts, the name they have on file for me has been transposed several times over the years.

    My name is European, and doesn’t cause any sort of nonsense words or odd abbreviations no matter how it’s arranged or abbreviated. But my own problems with commas in account files makes me very sympathetic to someone like the OP.

  33. johnbc5 says:

    I always keep a months expenses in cash in the safety deposit box.

  34. H3ion says:

    In all seriousness, we use three banks. One is our main banking relationship with checking, savings, mortgage etc. One is a convenience checking account with a bank that has a lot of ATM locations, and the third is an account that my wife set up which has both checking and savings. I have direct deposit into the main account but since I run payroll I can change that in a flash if our bank ever froze accounts.

    As a practical matter, my main bank calls me whenever they think there’s an issue.

  35. feyshadowgirl says:

    I wonder if Mariuana Pepsi has this problem….

  36. Bagumpity says:

    I’ve often thought about legally changing my name to something that looks “funny” on a computer screen. My favorite is “Lastname First” as in my first name would be “Lastname” and my surname would be “First.”

    Customer Service Rep: What is your name, sir?
    Me: Lastname First
    CSR: OK. Go ahead.
    Me: With what?
    CSR: Your name.
    Me: Lastname First
    CSR: Yes, what is your last name?
    Me: First
    CSR: Yes. Your last name first.
    Me: Exactly
    CSR: Exactly what?
    Me: Exactly my name, Lastname First
    CSR: Sir, what is your first name?
    Me: Lastname
    CSR: No your first name
    Me: Lastname
    CSR: OK, let’s try this again. I need your name to open an account.
    Me: Lastname First
    CSR: Yes
    Me: Yes?
    *click*

  37. 4Real says:

    I had issues with Bank of America calling them when i was out buying something and instead of giving me a refund in store credit Best Buy put a credit on my bank card that took 1 week. I needed to buy a laptop so I called BofA t transfer money to my checking it took like 15 mins of questions including what where the last 3 charges and their exact amounts. Who the hell knows that I use my debit card all day long. They froze my account because they thought i wasn’t who I was. It was crazy.