Live In The Mobile Home Of The Future

Would you live in a mobile home? No? What if it were solar and wind powered, and tricked out with the latest modern conveniences and looked sharp?

Treehugger’s Lyod Alter is selling his one-of-a-kind miniHome Solo prototype for $100,000. Whether your trailer park is urban or of the more traditional variety, you can live off the grid in environmentally-friendly style.

In a related story, people are also selling their houses so they can live off the grid in converted shipping containers, CR Home and Garden blog reports.

For Sale: Sustain Minihome Prototype [Lyod Alter via Curbly]

Comments

Edit Your Comment

  1. Coles_Law says:

    When a tornado comes by, every mobile home is wind powered.

  2. CumaeanSibyl says:

    I wouldn’t pay $100K for a mobile home, that’s for damn sure. You can get an actual house for a lot less around here.

    Plus, I’ve lived in an apartment that size (with my husband) and it’s awful.

  3. iron_chef says:

    it’s good design. It deserves a better name than a mobile home.

  4. lchen says:

    it’s nice. i would live in it, my apartment is about the same size.

  5. yume_ryuu says:

    I live in an apartment smaller than a trailer. If it wasn’t so damn expensive I would move it to a non-tornado prone place and live there.

  6. srh says:

    Neat design. Nicely appointed.

    Wait, what’s that? 350 ft^2 and $100,000?

    Oh.

    Never mind then.

  7. bohemian says:

    The problem with classifying it as a trailer is it ends up with the stigma of a trailer. Most trailer parks are pretty lousy places to live. If someone wanted to mass produce these there would need to be some better alternative for where to locate them.
    Having something fully contained and fairly off grid that you could put in a rural site might have benefit as a second home.

  8. Elcheecho says:

    i would live here for $50,000. $800 a month rent for 5 years comes out to $48,000.

  9. Heresy Of Truth says:

    I love trailers and mobile homes. Part of that is I can pick them up dirt cheap, and rework them into what I want. I could add wind or solar to an existing trailer for far less, and be happy with my green options.

    In my last trailer, I gutted the inside, and used recycled cabinets, and materials to redo the interior. I paid very very little to do so, as I did all the work myself.

    If you take away the affordable aspect of a trailer, then folks like me end up thinking, what’s the point.

  10. DrLumen says:

    “it was built to the highest standards without compromise”

    That explains the cinder blocks and 2×4’s holding up the ‘porch’. Can you get it with a ’72 Chevy up on blocks in the front yard?

    A rose, or mobile home, by any other name…

  11. quail says:

    In the 90’s our local paper ran an article about a small minority of people who were selling their $300 to $500 thousand dollar homes and moving into trailers. They sounded like the happiest bunch since their cash flow went up like 100% a month. The article ended with all of those interviewed wishing they’d moved out of their expensive homes much sooner in life to live a simpler style.

    But I must agree. It would all depend on where your trailer was parked as to how happy you’d be with it. Some parks are excellent, but most trailer parks deserve the stigma.

    • catastrophegirl chooses not to fly says:

      @quail: there’s a whole lifestyle movement about tiny houses. and often you can get around city codes and taxes by putting them on wheels.
      i’ve been fascinated by it for a while. [and of course went out and bought 1600 sq ft]

      [tinyhouseblog.com]
      [www.tumbleweedhouses.com]

    • Toffeecake says:

      @quail: Plus I bet it would be great for all those couples who’s kids have grown and gone, or even older childfree couples. A lot of people seem to have “too much house”, and really feel it in this economy.

    • bobloblawsblog says:

      @quail: actually, thats what were looking to do. we close on 10 ACRES dropping the $4k/mo mortgage

  12. Radi0logy says:

    Damn hippies

  13. evilpete says:

    How if I can get it air dropped on to 200 acres of that cheap Oragain/Washington state wilderness they sell on late night TV…..

  14. invormation says:

    As a kid, I lived with four other people in a 750 square foot home off the grid…and it was actually awesome. If I wanted to live alone, this would be my dream house. I think it’s beautifully designed.

  15. GitEmSteveDave_ Natural H1N1 Cure says:

    I only buy my mobile homes from someone I can trust…and also someone who can take a crescent wrench to the face 5 times.

    + Watch video

  16. nightshade74 says:

    I know I know… but I just got emailed
    this…. When you said “trailer”
    I had to share this video….

    _embedded

  17. Yurei says:

    Nope. Because at the end of the day, it’s still a trailer. And if this trailer’s a rockin, don’t come a knockin D:

    • kalaratri says:

      @DrLumen: If it didn’t LOOK like a trailer, I might consider it an option. The ‘rents have a lot of land and are starting to reach the age where they need to be looked after, but I don’t want to put an eyesore up in the backyard.

  18. SaraFimm says:

    How does it handle below freezing and 120F degrees? It’s only big enough for one person in my mind. Of course, I’m 6 feet tall so most places (and cars) are made too small for my size.

    • Skipweasel says:

      @SaraFimm: The only time I’ve stayed in a mobile home it was freezing inside – wasn’t even that cold outside! Don’t know what the rules are in the US but in the UK they’re exempt from the energy saving rules – or at least they were when the one I was in was built.
      I’ve been warmer in tents.

  19. mommiest says:

    There were a bunch of different models on display in DC at the Solar Decathlon a couple of weeks ago. All were small and utilitarian. Houston’s entry may be mass-marketed in the future, and it is built to withstand hurricane-strength winds. I think they were estimating the cost at about $85K. They were all much bigger than this, too.

    [www.solardecathlon.org]

  20. Triesharder says:

    Umm….”
    Complete with dual flush toilet, gray and black water tanks, full kitchen with propane powered fridge and stove, microwave and richlite counters.”

    “Quite possibly the world’s first, completely self-sufficient, ecological trailer design, the miniHome features ….”

    Which is it?

  21. HalOfBorg says:

    Mobile homes: They are beer cans to tornadoes.

  22. Bob Lu says:

    Check this out

    [www.greenbuildingadvisor.com]

    The basic unit is about 720 sq.ft and cost about 75K. It is not really an “off grid” house but you can upgrade it with optional solar panels.

  23. P_Smith says:

    @Paladin_11: In case you never noticed, not everyone lives in Oklahoma or Kansas. Or do you assume that tornadoes happen in mountain ranges too?

  24. subtlefrog says:

    @lmarconi: Yeah – in general, badly executed. There’s probably a market for this, but less so among people who will live in 350 sq ft. of dormishness.

  25. TVarmy says:

    @P_Smith: Tornadoes follow the mobile homes. It’s a fact. Tornado alley only exists because of all the mobile homes in the region. If they spaced them out over the continent, tornadoes would not be as big an issue. Sadly, the zoning committee in my town has yet to see my genius.

  26. s73v3r says:

    @subtlefrog: There’s a movement called the Small Home movement, in which people choose to live in tiny houses, sometimes around 100 square feet. In some ways it seems silly, but then when I look at where I’m living now, it doesn’t seem that bad.