Addicted To Debt? Take Our 15 Question Quiz

Are you addicted to debt? And I don’t just mean addicted like oh I’m addicted to curly fries, they’re so delicious, I mean addicted like a psycho-chemical need to keep slamming that credit card through the swiper. Maybe you know someone like this. Take this 15 question quiz, and if you answer “yes” to 8 more, you could be an addict.

15. Are your debts making your home life unhappy?
14. Does the pressure of your debts distract you from your daily work?
13. Are your debts affecting your reputation?
12. Do your debts cause you to think less of yourself?
11. Have you ever given false information in order to obtain credit?
10. Have you ever made unrealistic promises to your creditors?
9. Does the pressure of your debts make you careless of the welfare of your family?
8. Do you ever fear that your employer, family or friends will learn the extent of your total indebtedness?
7. When faced with a difficult financial situation, does the prospect of borrowing give you an inordinate feeling of relief?
6. Does the pressure of your debts cause you to have difficulty sleeping?
5. Has the pressure of your debts ever caused you to consider getting drunk?
4. Have you ever borrowed money without giving adequate consideration to the rate of interest you are required to pay?
3. Do you usually expect a negative response when you are subject to a credit investigation?
2. Have you ever developed a strict regimen for paying off your debts, only to break it under pressure?
1. Do you justify your debts by telling yourself that you are superior to the “other” people, and when you get your “break” you’ll be out of debt overnight?

According to Debtor’s Anonymous, a debt-recovery group based on the Alcoholics Anonymous precepts, if you answer yes to eight or more of these,”he chances are that you have a problem with compulsive debt, or are well on your way to having one. If this is the case, today can be a turning point in your life.

We have all arrived at this crossroad. One road, a soft road, lures you on to further despair, illness, ruin, and in some cases, mental institutions, prison, or suicide. The other road, a more challenging road, leads to self-respect, solvency, healing, and personal fulfillment. We urge you to take the first difficult step onto the more solid road now. “

15 Questions [Debtor's Anonymous] (Photo: DCvision2006)

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  1. zigziggityzoo says:

    I’m just glad I only have student loans (for now). 10 more months till I’m free and clear!

  2. Shadowfire says:

    I think #3 is most people….

    • Traveshamockery says:

      @Shadowfire: No…maybe many people, but not most. Why do you say that?

      • Rectilinear Propagation says:

        @InfiniTrent: If Shadowfire read it the way I did at first then they read “Do you usually have” instead of “Do you usually expect” and figured most people find it irritating that everyone wants to look at your credit now.

    • outoftheblew says:

      @Shadowfire: Not the people who know what to expect when their credit report is run and know they have nothing to worry about, and there are a lot of us out there.

      • theblackdog says:

        @outoftheblew: I disagree with you because I know what’s on my credit report and it isn’t anything out of the ordinary, but I do not know by what standards that person or computer has to determine if I am “worthy.” Therefore I still have a bit of that reaction that they’re probably going to say no.

  3. MrBlastotron says:

    *Sigh of relief as he makes his last payment on his only 2 credit cards*

    Feelin’ good at this point. Paying off your debt is one of my favorite feelings in the world.

    *gets ready to buy a house now… ugggggghhh*

    • admiral_stabbin says:

      @MrBlastotron: It took me a while to get over the emotional feeling of being in more debt than I ever have been…after buying my first home a year and a half ago.

      The tax benefits do help with the pain… ;-)

    • Sodypop says:

      @MrBlastotron: We paid off all our debts, except our morgage, last August which it is great and seeing our savings go up each paycheck is the best. But now we will be trying to get pregnant this coming July… as much as I am excited about starting a family, I wish it did not cost so much…

  4. t-r0y says:

    Let’s take the test for our Government…

    15. Are your debts making your home life unhappy? Sure — lots of arguments.
    14. Does the pressure of your debts distract you from your daily work? Yes
    13. Are your debts affecting your reputation? Yes
    12. Do your debts cause you to think less of yourself? No, don’t be silly
    11. Have you ever given false information in order to obtain credit? Umm, no. Well, maybe. Okay, yes.
    10. Have you ever made unrealistic promises to your creditors? Sure! Constantly
    9. Does the pressure of your debts make you careless of the welfare of your family? Yes.
    8. Do you ever fear that your employer, family or friends will learn the extent of your total indebtedness? No. They’re sheep.
    7. When faced with a difficult financial situation, does the prospect of borrowing give you an inordinate feeling of relief? Oh, yeah.
    6. Does the pressure of your debts cause you to have difficulty sleeping? Of course not, we know what we’re doing.
    5. Has the pressure of your debts ever caused you to consider getting drunk? Yep.
    4. Have you ever borrowed money without giving adequate consideration to the rate of interest you are required to pay? Yes.
    3. Do you usually expect a negative response when you are subject to a credit investigation? Yes. But only recently.
    2. Have you ever developed a strict regimen for paying off your debts, only to break it under pressure? Sure, all the time.
    1. Do you justify your debts by telling yourself that you are superior to the “other” people, and when you get your “break” you’ll be out of debt overnight? Well, we are superior. Aren’t we?

    Yes Total: 12 — We’re addicted!

  5. Segador says:

    It’s taken me about 4 years, but I don’t even think about debt anymore. No credit cards, cars paid, no loans. I don’t live like a king, but I don’t buy things I can’t afford, either. The lack of debt-related stress alone is worth it.

  6. BlondeGrlz says:

    Since I only answered yes to four, does that make me a functioning debtaholic?

  7. RBecho says:

    #5 was true for me after we closed on our house. It was a good rate, great deal, but the hugeness of it all was kinda crazy, and booze worthy.

    • The Cynical Librarian says:

      @RBecho: I’m with you there. Frightening as hell when you sign a paper saying you owe thousands of dollars to be paid out over many years.

  8. Jubilance22 says:

    I didn’t answer yes to any of these….

  9. econobiker says:

    My ex-wife needs to examine her life on this one.

    9. Does the pressure of your debts make you careless of the welfare of your family? Before I could share it, she stole the entire amount of our joint tax return money to catch up her car loan before it went to reposession -which I didn’t know about either.

    8. Do you ever fear that your employer, family or friends will learn the extent of your total indebtedness? With her credit cards she was like an alcoholic hiding bottles around in the home . I would go looking for some unrelated legal paper or bill statement and end up discoving completely unknown-to-me credit card statement for $1200 to $1400.

    1. Do you justify your debts by telling yourself that you are superior to the “other” people, and when you get your “break” you’ll be out of debt overnight?She used to lie to me about her financial “mistakes”. She was a salesperson who was always looking for the “big payoff” or “big sale” that would payout a large sum to catch up (multi-level marketing, etc)-never mind steadily working a regular job.

    And this is what she did to me before I even knew the term for it:

    Are you guilty of financial infidelity?:
    [www.bankrate.com]

    Financial infidelity is rampant:
    [articles.moneycentral.msn.com]

    She might as well have had a boyfriend behind my back. At least then I could have kicked her out to him…

  10. picardia says:

    I kept telling myself for years that there would be a big windfall that would get me out of trouble.

    Then, finally, I sat myself down, recognized this was irresponsible and got on a better footing.

    Six months later, the windfall came. Yay!

    But although I have been much more responsible since, it’s sometimes really hard to stick to that because I keep thinking, “Well, it worked the first time –”

    • LadyNo says:

      @picardia: A friend of mine is working to pay off her family’s maxed out credit cards for the 3rd time. (She’s not decadent, just living like lots of 20 somethings do)

      The first time they used wedding gift money to pay them off.

      The second time they used money from an injury settlement to pay them off.

      This time they’re doing it all on their own with “real” money.

      Using windfall money to pay stuff off is a quick fix, you never learn your lesson and just get back into the debt. I guarantee after this 3rd payoff, my friend will never let herself get into that kind of debt again.

  11. honestlytoomuch says:

    After you recover can you begin to use credit cards responsibly or is it like being an alcoholic: you can never drink again?

    • MostlyHarmless says:

      @honestlytoomuch: Nah, its more like being very obese and then slimming down. You dont give up on food once you decide to slim down.

      On the contrary, theres a certain amount you need, and is infact good for you. [The credit card parallel would be to pay off the balance every month. You still earn rewards on the credit you use.]

      True Story: Everyone kept on talking about going “cash only” and “credit cards are BAD” and i thought there was something inherently bad with CCs. Turned out they only meant it when you spend more than you can afford to pay back. That thought never even crossed my mind. “Why would I spend money I dont have??”

      • LadyNo says:

        @Lucifer_Cat: My husband and I both had about $2K in credit card debt before we got married. When we got the cards paid off, we knew we needed to detox because we were careless credit card users. So it’s now been 3.5 years that we’ve been credit card free. Now that we’ve learned to live without them, we finally feel ready to start using them again.

      • Outrun1986 says:

        @Lucifer_Cat: If you go cash-only, you can’t shop online, which is where you get the best deals. Overall your going to be spending more money if you go cash only, however if you can’t handle a credit card then this is the way to go for you.

        Again when shopping online you have to control yourself and don’t buy things you don’t need. Instead use the tool of online shopping to find products that meet your needs better and cost less than those in a traditional retail store. Since there is a wider selection of products available online you will likely be able to find something for less money that meets your needs just fine.

        • David Brodbeck says:

          @Outrun1986: Debit cards work fine online. Most people regard them as a form of cash. I don’t personally like them for a few reasons but they’re a good way to go if credit cards tempt you to bad behavior. Some people seem to psychologically regard their credit line as money in the bank, somehow, and find it hard to resist the temptation to spend it all.

  12. sleze69 says:

    No to all.

  13. MostlyHarmless says:

    Only one. And thats solely because I only have a very short credit history. Happened to me when I tried to get the car last year.

    “Well, theres nothing wrong in your credit history, except that you dont have one.”

    But other than that, debt free. The car is on a lease though. Never carry balances on the Credit Card or buy stuff outside my budget.

    Only ‘debt’ I had was a couple of Ks I borrowed from sis when I first started working, just as an emergency fund. Paid that back as soon as I had my emergency fund up. Lifes good.

  14. Robert Jason Cervantes says:

    I am guilty of a few of these. But I am slowly but surely paying these off. In fact, I used my tax refund to completely take out one of my cards. Next month, I will be done with another one. It just takes time and patience. But seeing a balance of zero is really rewarding.

    For those looking for work and can’t find it (due to such a large job pool), I suggest you start networking and do some odd jobs here and there. I have started doing basic computer work around the neighborhood. Every day I pay off more debt, my smile starts coming back.

  15. shadowboxer524 says:

    That woman in the picture, obviously a “Cred Head”.

    • The Cynical Librarian says:

      @shadowboxer524: I think it needs to be pointed out; she’s less addicted to debt than she is to hardened plastic fumes.
      …delicious hardened plastic fumes…
      Someone call R.J. Reynolds.

    • Blue says:

      @shadowboxer524: To whoever took that pic: You blew it, …She’s smoking a CHARGE CARD. The image she be of her smoking a CREDIT CARD. Big difference!! Nice try though.

  16. howie_in_az says:

    If you replace ‘debt’ with ‘savings’, I’m guilty of a lot of them.

    15. Are your savings making your home life unhappy?
    14. Does the pressure of your savings distract you from your daily work?
    13. Are your savings affecting your reputation?
    12. Do your savings cause you to think more of yourself?
    11. Have you ever given false information in order to obtain an extra percent return?
    10. Have you ever looked at a competitor bank’s savings accounts and seriously thought about moving?
    9. Does the pressure of your savings make you care more about the welfare of your family?
    8. Do you ever fear that your employer, family or friends will learn the extent of your total savings and want to borrow money?
    7. When faced with a difficult financial situation, does the prospect of saving give you an inordinate feeling of relief?
    6. Does the pressure of your savings cause you to have difficulty sleeping?
    5. Has the pressure of your savings ever caused you to consider getting drunk with high-priced champagne only to see the actual price and instead opt for the cheap stuff, and only if it’s on sale?
    4. Have you ever transferred money just to get an extra half-percent return?
    3. Do you check your bank’s APY religiously?
    2. Have you ever developed a strict regimen for saving and never broken it — even under pressure?
    1. Do you justify your saving by telling yourself that you are superior to the “other” people, and when you retire you’ll be happy?

  17. bishophicks says:

    There’s one test where I’m glad I scored a zero.

  18. CumaeanSibyl says:

    I scored a three, but that’s because I’m a huge neurotic. Almost anything can cause me to lose sleep, think less of myself, or turn to the sweet embrace of bourbon (or it would, were I not worried about the cost of liquor).

    Realistically, I know we’re in a good position, but I think I worry more about debt than some people who actually have a problem. Even our car loan, which I hate, has a low interest rate and a small principal. I already have a third of the amount saved up, and I hope to have it paid off by the end of the year.

  19. kwsventures says:

    Credit card debt? Please, are you insane?

  20. oregongal says:

    There was a time when I could have answered yes to many (if not most) of the questions. Nowadays I can in all honesty say no to most (if not all :) ) of the questions. My only debt as of February 9, 2009 is my mortgage. I paid my car off 6 months early (**does a happy dance**) and have no CC’s. Life is good again. Frankly I see my mortgage as good debt and I don’t stress over it.

  21. Anonymous says:

    DA is a fellowship of men and women who are recovering from debt. It is a wonderful program which saved my life. I have been a member of DA for 14 years.

    Please visit DA’s website at: http://www.debtorsanonymous.org

    Thanks.

    Alan K.