Could This Be The Most Expensive Bottle Of V8 In The World?

This will make you feel a little better about grocery shopping in your neck of the woods (unless your neck of the woods is Nunavut, Canada, of course.) Reader Steve sent in the above photo of V8 at his grocery store. No, it’s not an error, and Canadian dollars are about equal to the USD these days. According to my extensive research, I can have that much V8 delivered to my house right now for $5.12. Sorry, Steve.

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  1. Parting says:

    Simple pricing mistake. V8 isn’t worth more than 5$ anywhere in Canada. Unless you have gold floating inside the bottle. Than never happens either.

  2. astrochimp says:

    I hear they’re going for about 65 billion dollars in Zimbabwe right now.

  3. OldJohnRobinson says:

    Well, with the biofuels rush causing a spike in vegetable prices, it isn’t completely out of the realm of possibility.

    Does V8 still taste like rotten garbage?

  4. LikwidFlux says:

    @Victo: What part of ” No, it’s not an error” don’t you get?

  5. astrochimp says:

    @Victo: Are you sure it’s a simple pricing mistake? Note the truly middle-of-nowhere location.

  6. AMetamorphosis says:

    I am a regular purchaser of V8 and regardless of what was said, I still find this hard to believe.
    True, the cost would be higher due to the remote location but what verification do we have that this photo hasn’t been altered?

  7. OldJohnRobinson says:

    If I had to bet…someone in data entry screwed up and put the case price in for the single unit price in the system.

  8. lilacorchid says:

    When I was in Churchill MB (which has rail and air service)about five years ago, a gallon of milk was $12. I doubt that is a pricing error. In a fly-in community (air service only), things like V8 are a luxury and you have to factor in airfare for that bottle!

    Victo and AMetamorphosis, where are you from? If you have a road into your community, you are not remote. I don’t care how long you have to drive to get to a large centre.

  9. temporaryerror says:

    I absolutely love the taste of fresh V8. (older V8 starts to taste kind of metallic.) The generic brands just don’t taste very good but the brand name stuff is great. Anyway, how do we know that this price isn’t an error? Did the OP talk to the store mgr and ask about it?

  10. AMetamorphosis says:

    @lilacorchid:

    I live in Harrisburg, PA so yes, you are correct that I don’t have to pay the costs associated with a remote delivery. I guess V8 wouldn’t be a daily item for me @ that price ! :-)

  11. ringo00 says:

    This is pretty much par for the course at the stores in logging and mining camps. Massive price gouging it pretty rampant and it is to be expected when the store at the camp is the only business within hundreds or even thousands of miles.

  12. Rectilinear Propagation says:

    @ringo00: Yeah, but you’d have to really, REALLY need some V8 to spend almost $34 on it.

  13. Grabraham says:

    @ringo00: Is it gouging? If you are the only store for hundreds or thousands of miles there is usually a reason. Maybe it is because it is more expensive?

  14. lilacorchid says:

    @AMetamorphosis:

    The first time I was in Churchill, I couldn’t believe how much stuff cost either. My brand of shampoo was double the cost of what I buy it for in the south. :)

    The government offsets some of the costs with Northern Allowance. It’s a subsidy based on where you live.

  15. Ben Clayton says:

    Steve has a bunch of pictures from his trip in a thread on SomethingAwful, really great read.

  16. tedyc03 says:

    Yeah but they get a full solar eclipse on that date, plus the northern lights, so they should quit their bitchin’. ;-)

  17. Ben Clayton says:

    Sorry for the double post, but the reason things from the mainland area are so expensive up there, is that it takes so much fuel and time to ship it up there, there are pics of movies at the store like Hot Rod or Semi Pro going for 59.99, and various other items from Canada or America for a lot more.

  18. AMetamorphosis says:

    on my salary …

    ( Slaps forehead )

    I couldn’t afford a V8 … lol

  19. WinnipegDragon says:

    That’s not a pricing error. I used to sell and service grocery store cash register systems here in Winnipeg, and in the fly-in communities you basically multiply all pricing by somewhere between 3x and 6x regular price. Liquids like V8 and Milk are extremely expensive because they are heavy and costly to ship.

    Once winter rolls around, they can use the winter roads, but even then it’s a long haul.

  20. thomanjones says:

    That’s a great deal, actually. I hear that KBR charges 50$ a bottle to our troops in Iraq.

  21. Mistrez_Mish says:

    For that price, these bottles of v8 better give you super powers!

  22. RhymePhile says:

    I think it might actually be cheaper to buy the vegetables and juice them yourself!

  23. kc2idf says:

    I’ll have Nunavut.

  24. Shadowman615 says:

    @kc2idf: Strangely enough, that’s hillarious.

  25. MagicEightBall says:

    Some friends of mine spent some time in Nunavut recently, though not quite so far north. They sent back many pictures of stuff in the grocery stores. For example: 24 cans of Coke for $39.99, a single frozen pizza for $19.49, and lets not forget a 1 litre bottle of whiskey for $140 (including the $50 license required in order to purchase alcohol).

  26. smirkette says:

    @RhymePhile: That’s what I was thinking. You can get a good juicer for ~$100. Pays for itself in three bottles of V8…plus you’ll know it’s all natural.

  27. Parapraxis says:

    @SF_iris:

    fresh vegetables must be really hard to come by, though, don’t you think?

    now fresh squeezed walrus from Fishy Joe’s… that’s awesome.

  28. Ben Popken says:

    It’s cheaper to do a lot of things yourself. Thank goodness we have something called an economy so we don’t have to.

  29. jonworld says:

    @Victo: Once again (if you didn’t read on the post), this wasn’t a mistake. Nunavut, while being quite large in size, has a population of about 30,000 and is extremely remote. You can’t grow much there, also. With such high gas prices and presumably bad travel conditons, one can only expect to have a $34 bottle of V8.

  30. jonworld says:

    @SF_iris: Too bad your fruits (and vegetables) in Nunavut are probably going to cost you $5 apiece. Now let’s see if that juicer pays for itself.

  31. Are paychecks just as high in places like this?

  32. TechnoDestructo says:

    @jonworld:

    If it’s like a lot of northern locales, there may be wild berries all over the place for free (during late summer and whatever brief autumn exists). So…it could.

    Regardless, NO, if you’re in a situation where buying a bottle of V8 is going to cost you 30 bucks, buying vegetables would not be cheaper. This V8 is expensive because EVERYTHING that isn’t local (which is almost everything) is expensive.

    I grew up in Fairbanks, AK. Milk cost 4 dollars a gallon…IN THE 90s. And apples cost then what they do now in the most expensive cities in the lower 48. And that’s WITH roads, and rail lines, and a major cargo airport. Hell, to me, living in Japan was a bargain.

    Getting stuff to the middle of nowhere is EXPENSIVE.

  33. BaShildy says:

    I am the person who took the photograph at the Northern store in Igloolik, NU, Canada. Igloolik like all of Nunavut is only accessible by plane and the supply boat only arrives once a year. I believe they ran out of V8 this year so this bottle came by plane which is notoriously expensive. On top of that, non-essentials are marked up in order to make things like diapers, fresh fruits, and baby food affordable for everybody.

    Other interesting prices were:

    PS3 – $899 [lh4.ggpht.com]

    Semi Pro on DVD – $49 [lh4.ggpht.com]

    GPS Street Navigator – $664 [lh3.ggpht.com] ( There are only five unpaved, unnamed streets on the island town )

    And finally soda was $4-5 a can as they did not buy enough this year. When the boat arrives in August it will drop down to $2.50.

    If you are interested in reading about Igloolik, I have been maintaining a thread about my visit their last month at: [forums.somethingawful.com] and have put the videos on [www.youtube.com]

    Living in Los Angeles, Igloolik was an amazing vacation and I’m glad the photos and videos I took are starting to make their rounds on the net and generating interest about the arctic. A lot of my friends didn’t even know that Nunavut was a territory or the Inuit that live there.

    - Kevin King
    Los Angeles, CA

  34. BaShildy says:

    @Victo: Sorry if this double posts, but this was not a pricing mistake Victo. I took the photograph in June of 2008, in Igloolik, Nunavut, Canada.

    I am the person who took the photograph at the Northern store in Igloolik, NU, Canada. Igloolik like all of Nunavut is only accessible by plane and the supply boat only arrives once a year. I believe they ran out of V8 this year so this bottle came by plane which is notoriously expensive. On top of that, non-essentials are marked up in order to make things like diapers, fresh fruits, and baby food affordable for everybody.

    Other interesting prices were:

    PS3 – $899 [lh4.ggpht.com]

    Semi Pro on DVD – $49 [lh4.ggpht.com]

    GPS Street Navigator – $664 [lh3.ggpht.com] ( There are only five unpaved, unnamed streets on the island town )

    And finally soda was $4-5 a can as they did not buy enough this year. When the boat arrives in August it will drop down to $2.50.

    If you are interested in reading about Igloolik, I have been maintaining a thread about my visit their last month at: [forums.somethingawful.com] and have put the videos on [www.youtube.com]

    Living in Los Angeles, Igloolik was an amazing vacation and I’m glad the photos and videos I took are starting to make their rounds on the net and generating interest about the arctic. A lot of my friends didn’t even know that Nunavut was a territory or the Inuit that live there.

    - Kevin King
    Los Angeles, CA

  35. ywgflyer says:

    How about $3.00 for a can of pop? Seen it up north, too. Everything’s more expensive there.

    I fly for a small airline that services almost exclusively fly-in-only places such as these (although not as far north as Baffin Island) – - next time I’ve got some time to kill, I’ll try to get more pictures like this one (especially, as mentioned, milk, which really can go for over $12/gallon).

  36. mariospants says:

    I’m pretty sure that the salaries are adjusted to compensate (for those people who actually earn a living there). Just give it some time for global warming to kick in and they’ll be growing oranges in no time.

  37. Inglix_the_Mad says:

    @Victo: Simple pricing mistake. V8 isn’t worth more than 5$ anywhere in Canada. Unless you have gold floating inside the bottle. Than never happens either.

    I don’t know in Timmins, ON they might expect it to have gold :p

    @ywgflyer: How about $3.00 for a can of pop? Seen it up north, too. Everything’s more expensive there.

    Yeesh, where are you stopping? Timmins is in the middle of nowhere and it wasn’t that expensive. Sure gas was by the liter and not cheap, cigarettes were bad, but food / soda? Relatively cheap. (relative being that I’m comparing it to WI)

  38. lilacorchid says:

    @Inglix_the_Mad: Timmins, ON has a road. Therefore it’s not in the middle of nowhere. Not even close. ;)

  39. geckospots says:

    @ywgflyer: I have a picture from my summer so far [I'm in Greenland] of a Coke machine that charges 20 Danish kroner for a 500ml bottle of Coke. That’s a little over five bucks.

    We got a pound of fresh ginger in our last grocery order… it cost something over $30. Milk is something like $15/l for the fresh stuff, the UHT stuff is much cheaper. It’s about $12 for a pint of beer, too.

  40. geckospots says:

    @lilacorchid: Where I am right now, I had to take four planes, a ferry trip, and a helicopter. ^_^

    Stuff costs a *fortune* here.

    @mariospants: Many northern places do that. When I worked in the Yukon we got an Isolated Post Allowance to compensate for the difference in cost of living from down south to up north. It added about $3/hr to my paycheque, so it was definitely welcome.

  41. temporaryerror says:

    I wonder if they have more shoplifting problems at such stores…

  42. NumberFourtyThree says:

    Now imagine what it must cost if you lived on Ellesmere Island.

  43. MrEvil says:

    Doesn’t surprise me something like V8 costs so much in a remote place. They have to fly goods in during the winter when ships can’t get past the ice pack. Other remote areas in Canada have the benefit of winter roads at least.

  44. kable2 says:

    @lilacorchid:

    were you in churchill falls? if so hydro subsidizes the food costs at the supermarket and the prices are not bad.

    if its not churchill falls you were talking about…where is churchill?

  45. Benny Gesserit says:

    @JamieSueAustin: Somewhat and the government give a ‘northern allowance’ to offset costs as well. (It’s the fed’s way of saying “Thanks for living where most people would go a little kookie after 48hrs!”)

    @Parapraxis: Ride the Walrus!

  46. Eilonwynn says:

    @kable2: Churchill, Manitoba, not Churchill Falls, Labrador. See Here – [maps.google.com]

    As a part of an arctic life course, one of my Anth profs regularly gives us photos of grocery stores in Nunavut and other remote areas, showing prices. Pretty mindblowing for some of the first years who are just getting used to the idea that groceries don’t appear like magic.

  47. darundal says:

    Here is a link to the SA thread

    [forums.somethingawful.com]

    A post by the guy who started the thread a little further down explaining the price

    Nope. It means that government checks help lighten the load. The houses were for the most part built by the government so they don’t have rent/mortgage to worry about. Food is heavily subsidized by luxuries like soda and smokes. Both of the general stores sell vegetables and fruits way under price by inflating the costs of non-essentials so that unemployed Inuit can survive. Gasoline is going to be killer for them in a couple months when the boat arrives because they pay the same dollar amount per 5 gallon tank for the entire year and they are still on last year’s prices

  48. anaisnun says:

    In the early 90′s I stayed at a village in Alaska that was not accessible by road.
    No road was ever built that went to this village.
    Groceries were flown in.
    I don’t think the pricing is a mistake.
    Food was super expensive so I ate a lot of fish as did everyone else.
    I once paid $40 for a fifth of cheap whiskey up there because someone had to go on a plane to the liquor store in Kodiak, buy it for me for $12 and bring it back again on a plane.
    That’s just how it goes.

  49. RandomZero says:

    I work with someone who just got back from nunavut, and have lived in the extreme north of the provinces before. This is definitely not a mistake. Groceries in most of that region are flown in by small prop planes (typically four- to eight-passenger sea or skiplanes, when I was in Wallaston Lake.) This makes things prohibitively expensive, to the point that the average wage there is off the charts compared to down south, and it’s STILL necessary for the government to give huge tax cuts and subsidies. Alcohol in particular is worth about its weight in gold.