"Whole Chicken Breast" Actually Chicken Part Composite

Why not try a SmartServe Chicken, brought to you by Sysco:

Our fully cooked Classic Brand SmartServe glazed chicken breast fillets have the appearance, taste and texture of a whole chicken breast at a much lower cost, plus they offer better portion control, consistent quality and easy preparation. Boneless, skinless, 100% chicken breast pieces shaped into natural breast fillets. Glazed flavoring. Unique 3-D technology gives you the look and texture of a solid muscle chicken breast, at a fraction of the cost.

Mmm…particle chicken! According to tipster Phil, it’s a popular item among restaurants.

Comments

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  1. thenotwho says:

    Ack! Scary.

  2. BlondeGrlz says:

    Unique 3-D technology? Do you need special glasses to see this chicken?

  3. B says:

    If only they could fit it in a can.

  4. BoomerFive says:

    Well, at least it’s all chicken, unlike the “chicken” mcnuggets that were 70% fish.

  5. apotheosis says:

    * Contains no crabmeat

  6. Gopher bond says:

    I kind of actually like this kind of chicken. I know, it’s gross. It’s used a lot in convenient store, heat-em up and buy, pre-assembled sandwhiches and it’s a bit “fluffier” than real chicken.

  7. Jean-Baptiste Emanuel Zorg says:

    Unique 3-D technology gives you the look and texture of a solid muscle chicken breast, at a fraction of the cost.

    You mean I have to wear these things for the whole meal?!

  8. boss_lady says:

    So, they’re like McNuggets? Sounds deeeelish.

  9. Is “they offer better portion control” another way of saying “the flavor sucks”?

  10. Jabberkaty says:

    And all this time I’ve been eating two dimensional chicken. No wonder it tasted like ashes in my mouth.

  11. apotheosis says:

    All this time people have been worried about the Large Hadron Collider creating black-holes and destroying the fabric of reality, when what they SHOULD be worried about is the rise of the four-dimensional timechickens.

  12. Skipweasel says:

    Perhaps it’s time for Ikea to get into the Flat-Pack chicken market.

  13. TheLemon says:

    Parts is parts.

  14. OKJeff says:

    The dining hall when I went to college served chicken like this in its sandwiches. Every single chicken “breast” was identical shaped with identical fake grill lines. Theirs were actually all pre-cooked, so they just heated them. Over the course of 4 years I probably ate over a 100 identical chicken breasts.

  15. I’ll bet they also use advanced meat recovery techniques….. no joke

  16. The photo sort of looks like canned dog food

  17. TWinter says:

    Glazed flavoring??? What is that supposed to mean?

  18. apotheosis says:

    @TheLemon:
    Whoa, oldskool. Nicely done.

  19. mjburnsy says:

    Kind of common household item now. You know those big bags of frozen chicken breasts for around 10 bucks? Yeah, samething.

  20. mir777 says:

    Glazed flavoring makes me think of donuts. Donuts have more culinary integrity than this frankenboob chicken.

  21. FilthyHarry says:

    I guess a logical extension of the restaurant chicken breasts that come with dyed on grill marks.

  22. apotheosis says:

    Honestly, is this any more obscene than a McRib?

    No.

  23. muckpond says:

    my favorite flavor! glazed!

  24. meeroom says:

    mmmmmm…. McRib!

  25. akalish says:

    @testsicles: I never thought of “fluffy” as a desirable characteristic of meat. I’m going to ask the server the next time I eat out if their meat is fluffy that day.

  26. apotheosis says:

    @akalish: Just ask the nice waitress to fluff your meat, and let us know how that works out.

  27. spanktastic says:

    Nothing like relying on the good folks at whatever company to help me portion control my food because they’re so concerned with me over-eating. With all that sodium-sugar-chemical-ridden glaze, I’m really really concerned about the portion size.

  28. shufflemoomin says:

    @BlondeGrlz: That comment brightened up a crappy day for me. Thank you :)

  29. Mr_D says:

    I’ve had a turkey breast like this. Comes with stuffing and everything. Not bad for the price, but not quite the real thing.

    It was only a matter of time before the particle board concept came to meat.

  30. Antediluvian says:

    @TinyBug: Sweet! Excellent pic.

  31. Snarkysnake says:

    It’s tough,but when I see a Sysco truck parked behind a restaurant,I cross that place off my list of regular eateries. When I see that they use this kind of precooked synthesized crap,I know that I’m being fed some mystery food product in the name of convenience and profit. BTW, this eliminates a LOT of the chains like Applebees/Ruby Tuesday etc… I try to ask around and find out which restaurants use fresh ingredients and real “what you see is what you get” dishes.( How many articles has Consumerist ran that have actual versus advertised food ?)

  32. Grabraham says:

    @spanktastic: I do not think Sysco is trying to control the portion size to help with your over-eating. They are telling their customers (Restaurants and other commercial food preps) that since the frankenchickenboob’s are all the same size and weight it is easier for them to deliver a consistent portion.

  33. Bagels says:

    This is the chicken breast they serve at Subway as well

  34. Pop Socket says:

    Fredrick Pohl called this stuff ‘Chicken Little’ over half a century ago. That is your io9 Moment of Geek for the day.

  35. m.ravian says:

    this isn’t a new thing, is it? i remember as a kid being told never to eat chicken nuggets at McD’s because they were made of livers and beaks and shit like that.

    in other news, SO glad i’m a vegetarian now…

  36. gamin says:

    I can see the advertising. New Chicken breast now with real white meat

  37. TheLemon says:

    @apotheosis: Sadly, I remember that commercial as if it were just last year. And I love saying “pieces parts”.

  38. mariospants says:

    @lookatmissohio: Oh yeah? You haven’t seen what Sysco is doing to Broccoli…

  39. homerjay says:

    @apotheosis: I seldom REALLY LOL but that one made me laugh.

  40. LordieLordie says:

    Parts are parts!!

  41. homerjay says:

    At this rate Soylent Green will be a reality in our lifetime.

  42. TheLemon says:

    @homerjay: Fluffy Chicken with a Soy-Like Glaze.

  43. evilmregg says:

    I ordered a chicken dish at Red Robin a few months back and it was quite clearly a processed chicken “breast” like this one. I could barely stomach the thing; it was awful.

  44. youbastid says:

    @Bagels: No, this isn’t what they serve at Subway – this is an actual chicken breast made up of whole pieces of actual chicken breast. What Subway uses, and any of those places with the painted on grill marks, is a ground up, reconstituted form of chicken.

  45. snazzycarrot says:

    @Snarkysnake: Sysco delivers all kinds of food, not just overprocessed chicken breastoids. At the restaurant I work at we get produce, fresh eggs, cheese and a lot of other things through Sysco. Shopping exclusively at the local farmer’s market, Kroger or even Sam’s Club doesn’t work too well for a restaurant.

  46. gmoney says:

    ooooooohhhhh!

    3D technology, that’s a hoot.

    I’ll got to ChickFilA, thanks.

  47. bbagdan says:

    My girlfriend once ordered a caesar salad with a grilled chicken breast from the menu of a popular eatery. Not only was the ‘breast’ not grilled (it was breaded) but on close inspection the ‘chicken’ was a spongy, pre-formed mass that contained small chunks of chicken, kind of like a giant McNugget.

    gross.

  48. gmoney says:

    @apotheosis: No but I bet it costs more.

  49. man_in_plaid says:

    Sysco is killing the culinary field. Cooks and Chefs who want to create good FOOD, have to contend with restaurant owners who see this sysco pre-made, heat and serve garbage as a better alternative to paying a talented cook to create something truly wonderful out of raw ingredients. Please, try to support restaurants that have to charge a bit more for food that is real and made on site as much as possible.

  50. BigBadRAM says:

    I love this stuff!
    It goes great with my cheese product and some non potato Pringles.

  51. Harlan says:

    This is probably pieces of meat held together with transglutimase (Activa is a brand, “meat glue” is a slang term). Interestingly, high-end experimental chefs are using this stuff too, to make interesting shapes and textures (not to mention to improve yield).

    See, for example: [ideasinfood.typepad.com]

    I’m more concerned about the chicken being pre-cooked and covered with some disgusting sauce, than with the transglutimase!

  52. homerjay says:

    @TheLemon: Its the taste sensation that’s sweeping the nation!

  53. urban_ninjya says:

    You do realize most of the food you eat at sit down restaraunts is Sysco anyways. They just take that precooked chicken and iron on some grill marks.

    How else do you get a fully cooked chicken breast in less than 3 minutes of cooking time?

  54. grspec says:

    @Harlan: That is an amazing website, thanks for the link.

  55. mac-phisto says:

    @OKJeff: my dining hall had the same thing – only breaded & fried – “chicken cosmos”.

    i miss my chicken cosmos. i probably ate about 100 of those just during finals week.

  56. MadameX says:

    Costco sells something similar to these–the frozen Tyson Teriyaki or Mesquite Grilled Chicken Breasts.

    I admit, I keep them on hand for an occasional quick sandwich meal… but I’m fully aware of what I’m getting.

  57. reznicek111 says:

    People who knowingly eat particle chicken should not feel obliged to throw stones at the houses of SPAMâ„¢ eaters.

  58. SJActress says:

    Um…okay. So, Sysco is completely honest about what’s in their product, and you’re harping on them why?

    I wouldn’t want to eat ground up chicken breast either; I would read the honest label and PUT IT BACK.

    And, a popular item in restaurants? Well, guess who won’t get repeat business from me?

    I really don’t understand exactly what the issue is here. Please clarify.

  59. urban_ninjya says:

    @SJActress: You’re totally correct that we have choices and we choose not to eat what we don’t like.

    Of course on the flip side, Sysco doesn’t sell to consumers directly, they are the largest restaraunt distributor in the US and about 30% of all restarunt food is from Sysco.

    So you can be eating at a 5 star italian restaraunt eating a chicken parmigiana, and not notice you are indeed eating particle chicken. Which millions of rich americans do every day.

    But I say, if people can server you 5 star spam and you feel it’s gormet cuisine, then you’re better off not knowing.

  60. cheeley says:

    I remember eating a grilled chicken breast at Hard Rock Cafe, I can’t remember if it was Florida or Hawaii, but it was this prticle-board chicken. I suppose that they were being truthful when they said on the menu that it was boneless chicken. They should use it as a selling point – “pre-chewed chicken-style patties – We mash that sucker so you don’t have to!””

  61. phil28 says:

    SJActress:

    “I wouldn’t want to eat ground up chicken breast either; I would read the honest label and PUT IT BACK.”

    So how would you read the label when it’s served to you on a restaurant? That’s the problem. There’s no way you would know you’re getting this c**p based on what’s shown on the menu. Maybe restaurants need to say “ground up chicken breast sandwich” instead of “house special chicken breast sandwich”.

    The sad part is we’re eating all this stuff thinking it’s healthy when it’s really not.

    To Snazzycarrot who says
    “Shopping exclusively at the local farmer’s market, Kroger or even Sam’s Club doesn’t work too well for a restaurant.”

    I say why not? It can make all the difference in the world for the customer and the restaurant. And any restaurant has a choice of ordering from much better provers than Sysco.

  62. trustsatan says:

    Foul. I know this is not new; the ingredients of any food product that that can be purchased at a gas station that contains any meat whatsoever will have “mechanically separated chicken” as one of the ingredients (think Slim Jims & Hot Pockets.) Why any chicken would need mechanical separation at all is the question in my mind.

    A buddy of mine and I once took a road trip from New York to Virginia; my buddy had made the drive before and suggested (with visions of mechanical chicken separators dancing in our heads) stopping at one of the numerous chicken processing plants in the great state of Delaware to see if they offered tours.

    Not only were there no tours, but every chicken plant was surrounded by barbed wire fences and had a security checkpoint manned by an armed guard at the entrance. Our idealistic notions about the magical world of chicken separating and processing had been shattered.

  63. PennStJeff says:

    Sysco bashing gets old. Sysco is a food DISTRIBUTOR and they will distribute whatever quality level of food you wish to order from them. When I go through my Sysco order guide, I can choose to spend the money on fresh mushrooms, or I can choose to get the mushrooms in a can. I can choose to buy fresh chicken or chicken particles. It’s 100% up the buyer period. If you brand any food establishment simply based on the name of the truck you see in the back, you simply have no clue.

  64. wrench212 says:

    It’s would be much more impressive if they DIDN’T have 3-D technology. I would love to see two dimensional chicken. Groundbreaking!

  65. Teapotfox says:

    (sings:) Particle chicken, particle chicken, doing the things a particle can… is it solid breast? It’s not important, particle chicken…

    I reject particle chicken simply because it doesn’t fit my TMBG parody rhyme scheme!

  66. Teapotfox says:

    @Jabberkaty: @apotheosis:

    Thank you for commenting so hilariously on the dimensional nature of the chicken! I really want to know what is so amazing about their 3D technology… this chicken would intrigue me more if it were created by one of those newfangled 3D matter printers, for instance.

  67. Plasmafire says:

    So what sort of glue do they use to hold the thing together?